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Posts Tagged ‘lawless regions

More than 60 million destitute people in northern Nigeria, Somalia and Afghanistan, the lawless and most hard-to-reach places could go unvaccinated, Red Cross chief warns

Peter Maurer, Red Cross chief, December 8, 2020.

Nick Webster. Dec 8, 2020

More than 60 million people in conflict zones and lawless regions could remain unvaccinated against Covid-19, the head of the Red Cross warned.

A global operation to vaccinate billions of people is due to begin.

But millions of the most vulnerable people may never receive a vaccine.

These include about 26 million refugees and tens of millions of internally displaced people.

One of the vaccines must be stored at minus 70°C, creating unique challenges for isolated communities.

“Producers of vaccines must be aware of the special conditions in which hundreds of millions of people are living, who are not close to any cold-chain supply,” Peter Maurer, president of the International Committee of the Red Cross, told The National.

Our focus is to negotiate with state authorities so underprivileged groups and displaced people have access to vaccines

“Since the pandemic, we have focused on the very difficult to reach conflict areas, where we are active.

“Our estimate is there are probably more than 60 million people living in areas outside of recognised government control.

“We must continue to negotiate there to prepare the ground for vaccines to be delivered.”

Specific requirements of the Pfizer and BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine mean healthcare providers must store it either in dry-ice for shorter periods or in specialised freezers at minus 70°C.

The vaccine has proved to be more than 90% effective in trials and is the leading candidate for viral protection, with several others promising similar efficacy.

Daily distribution in the US requires a carefully choreographed project including 12 trucks, 20 daily flights and specifically designed “pizza box” packaging that will keep vaccines safely stored.

A pharmacy technician from Croydon Health Services takes delivery of Covid-19 vaccine shots, developed by Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE, at Croydon University Hospital in Croydon, U.K., on Saturday, Dec. 5, 2020. Having cleared the shot from Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE, the U.K. is set to become the first Western country to vaccinate its citizens, a turning point in the battle to halt a pathogen that has killed more than 1.5 million people. Photographer: Gareth Fuller/PA Wire/Bloomberg
A pharmacy technician from Croydon Health Services takes delivery of doses of a Covid-19 vaccine, developed by Pfizer and BioNTech, at Croydon University Hospital. Bloomberg

The vaccine developed in the US by Moderna remains stable at a regular freezer temperature of minus 20°C for up to six months. After thawing, it can last for 30 days and can be kept at room temperature for up to 12 hours.

Once approved, several distribution operations are planned for other vaccine manufacturers elsewhere in Europe, Russia and China that will have similar demands on cold-chain logistics.

Conflict zones most vulnerable to vaccine shortfall

Geographical challenges, poor infrastructure and active conflicts will make it particularly difficult for aid workers to reach populations of refugees, asylum seekers and stateless people.

In Nigeria, a decade-long conflict between militias and the government has forced more than two million people to flee their homes. According to the UN, 7 million in the country are reliant on humanitarian aid for survival.

Meanwhile in Somalia, warring factions have displaced close to 3 million and a further million have been displaced in Afghanistan.

The World Health Organisation is working with its partners Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and the UN children’s fund to ensure that the infrastructure and technical support is in place to safely deliver as many doses to conflict areas as possible.

TOPSHOT - People gather outside a tent in one of the IDP (Internally Displaced People) camps in Pulka on August 1, 2018. - As the presidential race heats up ahead of February polls, the Nigerian government and officials of Borno state, the epicentre of the Boko Haram Islamist insurgency, are encouraging and facilitating the "return" of tens of thousands of people. As he campaigns for a second term in office, the incumbent president is working to show that he has delivered on his pledge to defeat the Islamists. But the reality is that people are being sent back to camps across Borno state while Boko Haram is still launching devastating attacks against military and civilian targets. Pulka is a garrison town built on a model becoming increasingly common across Nigeria's remote northeast region: a devastated town turned into a military base so soldiers can protect satellite camps and humanitarian agencies can distribute aid. (Photo by Stefan HEUNIS / AFP)
People gather outside a tent in one of the IDP (Internally Displaced People) camps in Pulka on August 1, 2018. Stefan Heunis / AFP

“Our focus is to negotiate with state authorities so underprivileged groups and displaced people have access to vaccines,” said Mr Maurer.

“We cannot have distribution cold chains required for the vaccines in some areas, such as northern Nigeria for example.”

Inside conflict zones, poor healthcare centres or a total collapse of services often mean regular vaccination programmes are abandoned. Precarious infrastructure and disputed borders can also make delivery of vaccines extremely difficult and dangerous.

These areas often have limited access to electricity, making the consistent refrigeration required for safe deliver a major issue, particularly in rural areas and warmer climates.

“Some regions never make the headlines and by nature are doubly underprivileged as they never get attention,” said Mr Maurer.

“I am worried about the forgotten conflicts in Iraq, Myanmar and Central America, which is very often out of the picture and context. (And Syria, Lebanon and Yemen?)

“Yemen falls into the news and then oblivion. We want to equalise these visibility discrepancies.

“No conflict emerges as more serious than another.”

Which vaccines will be delivered?

Many different vaccines are likely to become available in 2021 and the ICRC said it would consider which are available to use on staff and vulnerable populations.

“We are exploring all the vaccines that may be available and will decide which staff who are most at risk before we administer,” said Mr Maurer.

“As a default position we will wait for WHO approval on which vaccines are safe. This is a duty of care that is of critical importance.

“We have not taken a decision yet on which one. We should also be talking about testing and medicine.

“There is no reason why we will not use the vaccine that is locally available and considered safe, if it is available in certain places.

“We will not look for a uniform decision for all our operations around the world.”

Mosul. The ICRC president, Peter Maurer, is listening to what families have experienced during the war and their suffering.
ICRC president, Peter Maurer, speaks to families affected by the war in Mosul, Iraq. Courtesy: ICRC

Funding gaps create uncertain 2021 for aid organisations

Serious funding shortfalls during the pandemic threaten to derail some of the supporting work planned by aid organisations next year.

The ICRC, which employs about 20,000 people in more than 80 countries has run up a $139 million deficit.

Cutbacks have been restricted to operations in largely peaceful countries and at the organisation’s Geneva headquarters, where 100 staff are expected to lose their jobs.

One of the most publicised service cuts was the closure of a specialist centre in Lebanon to treat people wounded in conflicts in Syria, Iraq and Yemen.

Further spending cuts are planned for 2021, with $94m slashed from food aid and operational budgets in 30 countries.

You cannot shield yourself and your economy by only investing in your own country

The ICRC has made an appeal for 2.3 billion Swiss Francs ($2.6bn) for 2021 to support its work for people affected by conflict.

Mr Maurer called for a more united international co-operation to help the most vulnerable communities.

“In this region, it is inevitable that burden sharing is discussed again in the wake of the pandemic,” he said.

“Work is needed by humanitarian organisations, but also by political actors.

“There is a powerful argument to develop that you cannot shield yourself and your economy by only investing in your own country.

“Your economy will be haunted if you do not manage the global pandemic and stabilise the most fragile areas. Pandemics will not stop.

“These are issues that must play out in the dynamics of countries who need to stabilise their own economies but also invest in the global public good, such as fighting the pandemic.

“We hope this will lead to more generous support for humanitarian organisations.”Updated: December 8, 2020 11:18 AM

Read More

Red Cross chief: operations in Iraq and Afghanistan are underfunded

Mental Health Day: war and Covid-19 strain leave many in Middle East suffering in silence

Special report: Beirut families of ‘the missing’ demand answers

“Blood for blood”, “Must get up at 5 am…”, “Must work 360 days per year…” legacies are enduring

The tradition of “Blood for blood” revenge is a very common heritage on all continents, inherited and practiced not long ago, but enduring, and not about to vanish with current civilization trends.

Mankind started and developed as “River specie“ in plains, virgin forests, and on river shores.  This specie lived on fish and fruit trees and whatever vegetable nature offered.

Due to increase in number of the clan members, and the need to split up for cohesion reason, and rivalry among clans for fertile environment, and climatic changes…“River specie“ had to transferred to colder, dryer, and eventually to mountain plateau regions…The new breed of mankind is known as “Mountain specie“.

The “River specie“ who were displaced to desert environment with scarce water resources were called the nomad specie

Mountain specie  fled to borderline lawless regions, separating settled and urban civilizations, and had to live herding goats and sheep.

Mountain specie grew harder bonesheavier legs and buttocks, and swimming was becoming a much harder exercise to undertake for fishing. Eating red meat poisoned the Mountain specie, physically and mentally, and they acquired violent mood swings and insanity was prevalent among them:  They killed their own kind more frequently, and occasionally ate their victims.

The life-span of Mountain specie was significantly (statistically) shorter than the river specie because of the more dangerous activities, more prevalence of aches and pains in the lower back, swelling knees and ankles, heart attacks… They preferred to attack neighboring clans who were more settled and were engaged in agriculture, and they abducted females to serve them in old age (around 30 year-old at best)…

River specie disseminated falsehoods that the mountain specie had great characteristics and physical strength…just to encourage more of vacating the crowded river region. The river specie knew full well that the clans perched on mountain tops were actually a bunch of cowards:  They preferred to have their ass freeze rather than come down and reclaim their right to “eat fish” and fresh food.

Nomad specie and mountain specie share the characteristic of blood for blood legacy, of looting customs and living the day-to-day culture…

In the 18th century, Scotch-Irish from the lowlands of Scotland, the northern counties of England and the Ulster in northern Ireland immigrated to America and converged to the Cumberland Plateau in Kentucky and the southern States with identical environments: High plateau, borderline not delimited “debatable lands”, contested territories without established government or the rule of law…

Before they immigrated to America, these people were scraping out a living on rocky and infertile lands and they herded goats and sheep and lived a lonely and individualistic life-style. The other side of the coin is that these people were clannish by nature and formed tight family bonds and paying loyalty to Blood above all else.

For 3 centuries in the southern States, the highlanders practiced the blood for blood revenge legacy. Two families in a small village, cut out from civilization, would start hating one another and the killing of dozens in the two families would backfire for centuries. Like this mother who gets upset as one of her boys enters the house, moaning and screaming in pain from a fatal wound shot and she snails: “Stop it now. Die like a man as your brother died before you...”. These kinds of crap…

Nomads scraping a living in deserts have acquired the same kind of blood for blood legacy.

Culture developed in plains and river shores depends on the cooperation of others in the community. The culture in the Far East that depend on growing rice is called “Rice paddy” culture legacy.

Growing rice is the hardest and most meticulous agricultural work, and people harvest around four times per year small paddies.  This legacy is: “No one who can rise before dawn 360 days a year fails to make his family rich…” (an idiom in South China around the Pearl River Delta of rice paddies)

Doing well in math or physics or solving problems is not so much of ability as of attitude:  The longer you persist in resolving a problem the better your attitude to understand complex and difficult problems and topics.

The longer you insist on attacking a problem from different angles and perspectives the higher the chance of reaching this critical phase of “Yah! I get it. Eureka…”

If you are the type of people who acquired the patience of not leaving a blank in a 100-question sheet, you are most probably a success story…

Cultures that pragmatically places the highest emphasis on effort and hard work are best in doing math, in spite of their lower IQ scores compared to the biased questions of the western culture. Pragmatic means to actually do and finish any task/job thrown at you since childhood, whether you dislike or like the task…

And the reward? To be recognized by the community as a hard-working member that the community can rely on…

Six decades ago, the two species (River and Mountain) have been merging. How?

1. Water sources are polluted and toxic: Fish, fruit, vegetable, cereal…are all poisoned from herbicides, pesticides, chemical fertilizers,  toxic waste…Mankind is poisoned in the womb…and growing violent by the years and certified insane…

2. Except in the rich and developed States with affordable indoor chlorinated swimming pool and accessible clean beaches to the common people…mankind is churning out mountain specie type at increased rate, and more violent, and heavier in the hips, and suffering from musculoskeletal chronic ailments...What of those people hoarding reserves for the coming calamity of end of time?

3. With the advent of computer and TV… our standing position skeletal is less and less performing…

I can conjecture that within less than another 6 decades, mankind with revert back to the “”four-legged posture:  The hands will not touch the floor directly because extension appliances to the arms will be adorned by “hand-shoes” for restricted short-distance ambulatory exercises around the restricted studios…

Note 1:  Part of the article was inspired from a chapter in “Blink” by Malcolm Gladwell

Note 2:  https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2011/05/01/how-the-dog-pack-homo-erectus-went-awry-keep-running-properly/


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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