Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘leadership

What Loyalty, Heart, and likelihood of success have to do with Leadership?

Few things are more devastating than being used and abused by those you support.

Disloyalty burns like no other burn. Disloyalty demoralizes.

Loyalty for loyalties sake is foolish: Calling for loyalty demands reciprocity.

By Dan Rockwell

Strength:

The strength of an organization is expressed by the loyalty of its people. Military organizations thrive because members disadvantage themselves for the advantage of others, for example.

Giving:

Sacrifice of life calls for loyalty to the fallen. “No man left behind,” is the flip side of, “Give your life for the cause.”

If you want loyalty, give it.

Have you ever heard the bull crap line, “I need you too much to promote you?” Never be loyal to those who are disloyal.

Expression:

Loyalty is seen when:

  1. Gossip is rejected. All gossip is disloyalty.
  2. Serving others rises above serving self.
  3. Disagreement is encouraged and honored. People who won’t engage in constructive disagreement believe they’ll be thrown under the bus when it’s convenient.
  4. People own decisions even if they disagreed.
  5. Everyone is held to consistent standards. Those higher in organizations never enjoy benefit at the expense of others.
  6. Leaders take blame and share credit.

Sacrifice:

Disadvantaging self for others isn’t sacrifice when values align, it’s an honor. Standing for something enables you to stand-with.

Mistakes:

Loyalty is best seen in the context of mistakes and short-comings. Few things stir the soul more than standing with someone who fell short.

Stand with those who acknowledge mistakes and make corrections. Reject those who hide mistakes and persist.

Standing “with” demonstrates and invites loyalty.

Few things bring out the best in others more than loyalty. Who are you standing with? Who stands with you?

How and when do you express loyalty?

Have you seen loyalty at work?

 

Never assume your question is dumb. The obvious question is the right one to ask…

The hardest question to ask is the obvious one to you. How could you assume that the other attendees know better than what you don’t know and let the opportunity to learn pass you by?

Why are you afraid to ask what feels obvious to you?

Frequently, speakers take for granted that what they spent years to learn are basic to the audience, and they forget that they had to ask the obvious question in their first step to “professionalism”

The best way to challenge the status quo is with questions. Dumb questions test basic assumptions.

Are you afraid of looking dumb? Is remaining ignorant a better substitute?.

“It is not the answer that enlightens, but the question,” Decouvertes.

When you think you know, assume you don’t.

Questions create confusion initially and  eventually end confusion.

Dan Rockwell wrote: “Courageous leaders ask these questions.

  1. What are we doing?
  2. Compared to what?
  3. Who said?
  4. Why not? Move from “either/or” to “and” by asking, “Why not?”
  5. What problem are we solving?
  6. What’s working? How? Why?
  7. Begin agenda items by asking, “What questions should we ask?”
  8. What are our values? When employees cut themselves, values should come out.
  9. Which of our values is driving this decision? How?
  10. Where are we going?
  11. Who are we?
  12. How does this take us where we want to go?
  13. Who is our customer?
  14. What value do we deliver?
  15. How are we communicating our value to customers? Unperceived value isn’t valuable.
  16. How am I doing?

How about

1: Ask questions that lead to action. Knowledge emerges when people take uncertain action.

2: Always follow questions with silence.

Interested in more: Read Facebook responses to: “Leaders should ask stupid questions like _______.”

What dumb question can you suggest?

Seth Godin posted: “Is this the best you can do?”

If the answer to this is “yes,” and you think you’re done, you might be settling too soon.

The right question is, “Is this the best your team can do?”

And if you need a better team, it’s never been easier to get one.

Especially if you’re a soloist, a freelancer or a small company–if your upside is limited by the people you’re working with, get new people.

Any time you do work yourself, you’ve chosen not to use the services of someone who’s probably better at it than you are.

There might be really good reasons for that choice, but inertia isn’t one of them.

Getting rid of all MBAs: Why? Is the problem How to rethink Management?

Dan RockwellI asked Professor Henry Mintzberg, author of 140 articles and 13 books:

“If you waved a magic wand over businesses, what would you change?”

Mintzberg said, “I’d get rid of all MBA’s. We’d lose some good people, but in the whole, it would be a positive move.” Never mistake quiet voices for weak people.

A few problems that trouble Mintzberg about MBA’s, including management gone completely off the rails, are:

  1. MBA graduate with distorted pictures of management. They believe management is about management principles, among other flawed beliefs.
  2. They believe they can manage anything regardless of the business type.
  3. They have knowledge without experience which leads to hubris.

And if management isn’t about management principles, what’s it about? Mintzberg says “Management is connecting.” 

Although Mintzberg didn’t use the terms human or humane, they seem to explain his passion. He despises placing emphasis on productivity, particularly built on the backs of over-worked, burned-out employees. Pushing people simply works in the short-term.

Bloodletting:

Mintzberg believes cutbacks and layoffs are equivalent to the failed practice of bloodletting. They produce short-term profits and long-term loses. Mintzberg loves saying, “If you want productivity, fire everyone and sell from inventory.”

Long-term success:

Mintzberg believes organizations should be built for long-term success rather than quick profits. Shifting to the long view may be the most radical change businesses can make because it requires connecting.

Henry Mintzberg thinks modern management is off the tracks. He said:

“The problem in America isn’t the economy: It’s management.” Like what problems?

  1. MBA’s with no experience.
  2. Shareholder value.
  3. Separating management from leadership.
  4. Making Top-down strategy.  Strategy should emerge from conversations within an organization.
  5. Excessive executive compensations: Narcissism with over-compensated CEO.
  6. Using terms like “human resources” and “human capital” is sickening.
  7. Pushing employees to work harder and longer.
  8. Current hiring practices.

Hiring a CEO:

Henry Mintzberg says: “Stop hiring people who can impress.” 

Stop looking for perfect candidates: “Flaws aren’t fatal. Listen to the people who know them best, the people who worked for them. There are only two ways to find out someone’s flaws, marry them or work for them.”

Searching for perfect – flawless – candidates prevent anyone from saying the “emperor has no cloths”. In a world filled with “perfect” leaders, fakery prevails.

Fakery exacerbates stress in an already stress-filled world.

Email:

Mintzberg isn’t a big fan of email, to add a ninth item to the list. It obviously has a place but, “It does have an off button. I check email every three weeks.”  Mintzberg can be contrarian but not contrary.

Rockwell is asking:

What do you think is wrong with modern management?

If you could wave a magic wand over businesses, how would they change?

How are you navigating short-term vs. long-term views of business, management, and leadership?

Recent article by Mintzberg and Todd: The Offline Executive

A new approach to leadership development: Coaching Ourselves


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

April 2020
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