Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Malaria

This article was posted in October 2014 by Ricken Patel. Just a reminder of our Covid-19 pandemics and how the world community is fighting it.

Ebola, Covid-19…: Pandemics vs People

Ebola could threaten us all, and the most urgent need to stop it is for volunteers.
If just 120 doctors among us volunteer, it will *double* the number of doctors in Sierra Leone. Other volunteers – in health, sanitation, logistics – can help too.
This is a call to serve humanity in the deepest possible way, to accept serious risk for our fellow human beings.

Three weeks ago, hundreds of thousands of us went offline to fight climate change. This week, we’re going offline to help stop Ebola.

The Ebola virus is spiraling out of control. Cases in West Africa are doubling every 2-3 weeks and the latest estimate says that up to 1.4 million people could be infected by mid-January.

Talking about exponential growth is frightening

At that scale, this monster threatens the entire world.

I just read that the UN has only $100,000 in its fund for the Ebola outbreak

Mind you that AIDS harvest over 1.5 million each year (as much as Malaria and Dysentery combined).

Though, malaria is the number one disease followed by dysentery that put heavy burden on the States in Africa and Equatorial countries.

Previous Ebola outbreaks have been repeatedly contained at small numbers. But the scale of this epidemic has swamped the region’s weak health systems.

Liberia has less than 1 doctor for every 100,000 people. Governments are providing funds, but there just aren’t enough medical staff to stem the epidemic.

That’s where we come in.

If just 120 doctors among us volunteer, it will *double* the number of doctors in Sierra Leone.

Other volunteers can help too — lab technicians, logisticians, water and sanitation workers, and transport workers. Volunteering means more than time. It means risk.

Health professionals have already died fighting Ebola.

But if there’s any group of people that would consider taking this risk for their fellow human beings, it’s our community.

Great things come from listening to the deepest voices within us.

If you’re a health professional, or have other skills that can help, I ask you to take a moment, listen to the part of you that you most trust, and follow it.

Raising your hand to volunteer is the first step.

You’ll need to get, and provide, a lot of information to ensure you’re well matched to an available position. You will likely need to discuss this decision with your loved ones, and you can withdraw from the process later if you choose to.

For this effort, Avaaz is working with Partners In Health, Save the Children, and International Medical Corps, three of the leading organisations fighting this deadly disease.

We are also consulting with the governments of Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, and the World Health Organization.

While there is substantial risk, there are also clear ways to contain that risk. 

Ebola is spread through bodily fluids, so with extreme care, the risk of contracting it can be minimized.

So far, 94 health care workers have died of Ebola in Liberia, but almost all of them have been national health workers, who are far less well equipped than international volunteers. 

With treatment, the chances of surviving the virus are better than 50%.

Many of us, from police to activists to soldiers, have jobs that involve risking our lives for our country.

It’s the most powerful statement we can make about what’s worth living for. Taking this risk to fight Ebola, makes a statement that our fellow human beings, wherever they are, are worth living for:

If Ebola spirals further out of control, it could soon threaten us all. The fact that a weak health care system in a small country can let this monster grow to a size that threatens the world is a powerful statement of just how interdependent we are. But this interdependence is far more than just interests.

We are connected, all of us, in a community of human beings.

All the lies that have divided us – about nation and religion and sexuality – are being torn down, and we are realizing that we really are one people, one tribe. 

That a young mother and her daughter in Liberia fear the same things and love the same things as a young mother and her daughter in Brazil, or the Netherlands.

And in this unfolding understanding, a new world is being born.

Out of the darkest places come our brightest lights.

Out of the depths of the Ebola nightmare, let’s bring the hope of a new world of one people, willing to give, and sacrifice, for each other.

With hope and determination,

Ricken, John, Alice, Danny, and the whole Avaaz team.

Note:  See the video

Fighting Ebola street by street

Good people are all around the globe! Disasters too –

Thanks Ben C. Solomon for this great video about ‪#‎ebola‬ –
Sean Casey makes me think of u and all the great work u and ur colleagues are doing!http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/africa/100000003161313/fighting-ebola-outbreak-street-by-street.html?playlistId=100000003105684&region=video-grid&version=video-grid-headline&contentCollection=Ebola+Outbreak&contentPlacement=0&module=featured-videos&action=click&pgType=Multimedia&eventName=video-grid-click

More information:

Up to 1.4m people could be infected with Ebola by January, CDC warns (The Guardian)
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/sep/23/ebola-cdc-millions-infected-quarantine-africa-epidemi…

Known Cases and Outbreaks of Ebola Virus Disease, in Chronological Order (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/history/chronology.html

Ebola ‘devouring everything in its path’ (Al Jazeera)
http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2014/09/ebola-devouring-everything-path-201499161646914388.html

Ebola death rates 70% – WHO study (BBC)
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-29327741

Unprecedented number of medical staff infected with Ebola (WHO)
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/ebola/25-august-2014/en/

Timeline of global deaths: January 1st to April Fool.

Covid-19 has overshadowed the reality of what kinds of deaths people are succumbing to.

This table does Not cover all the curable diseases because of lack of medical treatment and available health care valid system

More importantly:

Those dying out of famine, by the millions, particularly in Yemen, Sudan (North and South), the Congo and those States ravaged by continuous civil wars

Those dying from drinking foul water: dysentery, Typhoid fever, Yellow fever…

All those 30 million refugees on the road, dropping like flies in inhospitable lands.

Inline imagemalari

 

Is polio next to be eradicated? What disease was wipe-out anyway?

Melinda Gates spoke on TED (Technology, Education, and Design) and claimed that polio is 90% eradicated (kind of less than 2,000 cases last year).  She was apprehensive that the generous donors might be witnessing “polio fatigue”, and might be reluctant perusing donations after two decades of containing polio.

In India, a single case of polio generated the vaccination of 2 million kids in the region.  Ethiopia is witnessing a significant drop in infantile mortality rate because remote communities are training specialized nurses for vaccinating and delivering pregnant women.

Diseases like malaria, diarrhea, measles, tuberculosis, cholera, polio, and countless others banal diseases that have vaccines, or can be treated with antibiotics, are still rampant and killing everyday thousands of babies and adults in under-developed States, particularly, kids under 5 years of age.

For example, Cholera is back in force and threatening to spread in many neighboring States to Zimbabwe.  Mugabe of Zimbabwe refuses to step down as President and his State is suffering great famine, miseries, and the plague.  Thousands of people have contracted cholera and over 7,000 have already succumbed.   Cholera cannot be controlled; it could not be through the ages and current progress is not at a par with that plague.  Why?  Cholera has the capacity to mutate: an element of AND code new functions for the benefit of the bacteria, modifying its genome and increasing its adaptation to treatments or new antibiotics.

So far, medical research has not mapped out all the means of transmissions of Cholera.  It is possible that home pets, cats and dogs, carrying flea might be transmitters of the epidemic.  What is known is that older generations of antibiotics such as streptomycin, chloramohenicol, and tetracycline are increasingly inefficient against the bacteria of cholera.  The antibiotic based on fluoroquinolone might be of more effectiveness.

The best angle to analyze the topic of transmissible diseases to divide the diseases in three categories.  The first category represents the diseases that have effective and cheap vaccines and antibioticsThe second category represents disease that require costly vaccines, expensive treatments, and common surgeries but can effectively cure.  The third category is reserved for diseases that have no cures but can be contained for several years until progress is achieved like AIDS and a few other cancerous cases.

For the third category, funds are allocated to the under-developed States, simply because the rich States need guinea pigs to experiment with treatments that are traumatic in their own communities.

The first category is the most promising for decreasing drastically the casualties at an affordable cost.  Basically, the vaccines and the prior generations of antibiotics have already covered the expense of experimentation, and have been a cash cow for many decades.  The main expense would be to train local nurses in remote communities, and university students in medicine, to administer vaccines and inexpensive antibiotics that are still effective.

The second category is not as urgent for the under-developed States as the funding and the structural organizations for eradicating the diseases in the first category.  There has been a mobilization in 1994 for creating a world bank for medicament and vaccines and a few States invested funds in that bank but there was lack of active pursuit for the long term.  All the health related branches in the UN such as UNICEF, OMS, PAM, FUND, Red Cross, and Red Crescent have been working on the field for many decades, but diseases are gaining the upper hand.

The scarcity of resources allocated to fighting disease in the under-developed States need to be restructured.  Priority should be given to diseases in category #1, before attacking effectively diseases in category number two.  At least, trained nurses and medical students would be ready to tackle more complex treatments.

You may read my article https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2009/02/17/the-under-developed-countries-are-plagued-with-common-diseases-any-resolutions/

Note 1:  A short history on Cholera or plague.

Bubonic plague has a long history, through the ages, to devastating more than a third of a population as it hits.  Cholera lands suddenly, kills for a short period and then disappear for no known reasons.  The best remedy was to flee as quickly, as far away as is possible and not to return any time soon.

The Jews in Judea were decimated during David.  The troops of the Assyrian Monarch Sanhareeb, putting siege to Jerusalem in 701 BC, suffered the plague. Greece and Athens in 430 BC was devastated by cholera as Sparta was laying siege to Athens. Ancient Rome was plagued.  Cholera hit Byzantium during Justinian for one century and traveled around the Mediterranean basin; Pope Pelage II succumbed to cholera in 590.

In 1346, the Mogul troops, laying siege to Caffa in Crimea, were plagued and they catapulted infested bodies over the rampart of Caffa.  The Genoa defenders fled Caffa and transmitted the plague to all Europe; Spain, Marseille, Paris, England are contaminated and then Russia ten years later. France lost over a third of its population and Spain as many if not worse.

Cholera crashed London in 1665.   The English monarch and his family had to pay a long visit to the French Monarch.  The plague subsided when fire engulfed the better parts of the poorer quarters of London in 1666.

The last time, before Zimbabwe, that cholera expressed its virulence was in 1894 in south east China.

History accounts shows that cholera was carried by the Mogul troops arriving from Mongolia and Central Asia. As they sweep into relatively humid regions then plague settles in during summertime. India, Iran, Iraq, and Syria suffered plague during the Mogul successive invasions. I cannot but figure out a few hypotheses.

Note 2:  Alexandre Yersin, a French physician and bacteriologist, discovered in 1894 that Cholera is a bacteria but he failed to come up with a curative serum. Yersin still believed that rodents (rats) are the main culprit for transmitting this disease.  Only in 1898 did Paul-Louis Simond confirmed that cholera is transmitted by flea that quit dead rats to other greener pastures by sucking blood elsewhere.  Rats are infected with cholera but they are not affected or transmit it because they rarely bite humans.  Once a man is afflicted with cholera then the main transmitter of the epidemics are men.

Cholera infects people but does not bloom in dry arid regions.  Cholera is virulent in humid regions and during the hot seasons. Could it be because people sweat profusely? Especially because people failed to wash or take bathes in older days?  Or is it that since sweat excretes most of the salt in the body then cholera has an ideal medium of less salty body fluids to flourish and concentrate during the ripe seasons?

Move Inland, Son (May 7, 2009)

Sell your beach front residence; keep away from shallow islands, from tiny islands, from large rivers, from tropical regions, from vast pools of stagnant water, stay away from the Arctic regions, shun urban megalopolis, and cover your skin from head to toe.  Within ten years, almost every living person will be afflicted with one of the many viral epidemics sweeping regions considered safe, sanitized, and “civilized”.

The mosquitoes are coming and have climbed to 1,600 meters altitude, and are venturing to improbable locations and have craving for a taste of your blood.  Malaria, dengue, pork flu, aviary flu, and soon fish flue will mutate more cleverly than human mind has affected the environment.   Dengue has got hold of Latin America in Brazil, Bolivia, and Argentina; more than 113,000 cases last year and climbing. There are no remedies to these epidemics but conventional medicine of resting, fighting dehydration, and praying that this time around you might be of the lucky ones to care for your neighbor.  I think we should get familiar with the method of incinerating our dead and have an incinerator in every town and village in cases of frequent quarantines.

Climatic change of an earth growing hotter and hotter, more precipitation and for longer duration, the thawing of the Arctic, the ever more violent monsoon, hurricanes, and tidal waves are giving me water nightmares.

Yes, human production of CO2 and greedy deforestation have altered earth environment. The level of CO2 produced in Europe has remained stable because, as a State save on clean energy, it resells its quota to the less performing State within the European Union.  The USA of the last decade was in a state of comatose climatically and in environmental research.  China has more cars on its highways than the USA.  India is producing much cheaper cars and its internal market is ready to absorb million of these less expensive cars.

Industries will have to satisfy the demands of an additional 200 millions middle class families who can afford equal rights for consumer goods as the US, European, and Japanese consumers enjoyed for a century.

A solution can be reached on a global policy; an International Body with mandate to control and manage global problems.  How can this be feasible if the USA cannot “afford” a National Health Care, but can always find money to maintaining and expanding fleets of aircraft carriers in every sea and ocean?

The under-developed countries are plagued with common diseases: any Resolutions? (February 15, 2009)

Fundamentally, most governance in “non-developed” countries is performed on a caste-structure basis, regardless of religion, race, language, or colonial mandates. 

I have written many articles on caste structures but this is not the topic of this articles.

The facts are that many diseases that have been conquered and eliminated in the developed States, are still raging in the poorer States, and millions die uselessly, especially kids under 5 year-old.

 Why the funds and medical aides from the developed States and the UN are not making a dent in saving millions from common diseases that already had remedies for decades? 

Since 1941, penicillin has vanquished countless microbes and new antibiotics are being produced to counter the resilience of microbes that have developed resistance strategies, such as the Staphylococcus and other Streptococcus.

Diseases like malaria, diarrhea, measles, tuberculosis, cholera, polio, and countless others banal diseases that have vaccines, or can be treated with antibiotics, are still rampant and killing everyday thousands of babies and adult under-developed States.

The best angle to analyze the topic is to divide the diseases in three categories: 

The first category represents the diseases that have effective and cheap vaccines and antibiotics;

The second category represents disease that require costly vaccines, expensive treatments, and common surgeries, but can effectively cure;

And the third category is reserved for diseases that have no cures, but can be contained for several years until progress is achieved like AIDS and a few other cancerous cases.

For the third category, funds are allocated to the under-developed States, simply because the rich States need guinea pigs to experiment with treatments that are traumatic in their own communities.

The first category is the most promising for decreasing drastically the casualties at an affordable cost.  Basically, the vaccines and the prior generations of antibiotics have already covered the expense of experimentation, and have been a cash cow for many decades. 

The main expense would be to train local nurses in remote communities, and university students in medicine, to administer vaccines and inexpensive antibiotics that are still effective.

The second category is not as urgent for the under-developed States as the funding and the structural organizations for eradicating the diseases in the first category. 

There has been a mobilization in 1994 for creating a world bank for medicaments and vaccines, and a few States invested funds in that bank, but there was lack of active pursuit for the long-term. 

All the health related branches in the UN such as UNICEF, OMS, PAM, FUND, Red Cross, and Red Crescent have been working on the field for many decades, but diseases are gaining the upper hand.

The scarcity of resources allocated to fighting disease in the under-developed States need to be restructured.  Priority should be given to diseases in category #1, before attacking effectively diseases in category 2. 

At least, trained nurses and medical students would be ready to tackle more complex treatments.

Note: Constitutions in the under-developed States are shells. Constitutions were created to satisfy the basic requirements for adhering to the UN as a member State. Saudi Arabia failed to satisfy even a single clause of the UN Charters.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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