Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Millennial

Holocaust Is Fading From Memory, Survey Finds

Note: For seven decades, “never forget” has been a rallying cry of the Holocaust remembrance movement. Well, at least the Armenians and the Palestinians are Not about to forget, even the original Indians of the USA occasionally find it appropriate to remind the extremist Evangelical parties of their systematic genocide, the incremental type of genocide.

survey released Thursday, on Holocaust Remembrance Day, found that many adults lack basic knowledge of what happened — and this lack of knowledge is more pronounced among millennial, whom the survey defined as people ages 18 to 34.

31% of Americans, and 41 percent of millennial, believe that two million or fewer Jews were killed in the Holocaust. (The number extended by the Zionists and their allies want you to accept six million, no more, no less).

41% of Americans, and 66 percent of millennial, cannot say what Auschwitz was (or where this concentration camp was located. Actually it is in Poland).

And 52 percent of Americans wrongly think Hitler came to power through force. (Actually, strongly supported by the multinationals of the period, from around the world, and Stalin who gave the green light for the extermination of the German communists) 

“As we get farther away from the actual events, 70-plus years now, it becomes less forefront of what people are talking about or thinking about or discussing or learning,” said Matthew Bronfman, a board member of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, which commissioned the study.

“If we wait another generation before you start trying to take remedial action, I think we’re really going to be behind the eight ball.”

Image
Photographs of prisoners at the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum.CreditJames Hill for The New York Times

Despite the gaps in the respondents’ knowledge, the study found an overwhelming consensus — 93 percent — that all students should learn about the Holocaust at school.

And Holocaust denial remains very rare in the United States, with 96 percent of respondents saying they believe the genocide happened. (Sure it happened, and million more of many ethnic minorities in eastern Europe)

“The issue is not that people deny the Holocaust; the issue is just that it’s receding from memory,” said Greg Schneider, the executive vice president of the Claims Conference, which negotiates restitution for Holocaust victims and their heirs. “People may not know the details themselves, but they still think it’s important. That is very heartening.”

The survey, conducted by Schoen Consulting from Feb. 23-27, involved 1,350 American adults interviewed by phone or online, and has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus three percentage points. Millennials were 31 percent of the sample, and the results for that group have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus five percentage points.

The questions were developed by a committee that included officials from the Claims Conference, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem, as well as a Holocaust survivor and a polling expert from George Washington University.

(In a strange footnote, the head of Schoen Consulting, Doug Schoen, is in the news this week for arranging for President Trump to give a speech during a (2015?) event in Ukraine.)

Worldwide, the estimated number of living Holocaust survivors has fallen to 400,000, according to the Claims Conference, many of them in their 80s and 90s. And Holocaust remembrance advocates and educators, who agree that no book, film or traditional exhibition can compare to the voice of a survivor, dread the day when none are left to tell their stories.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington collects comment cards from many visitors before they leave, and they underscore that “no educational experience that anyone has coming through here has as much of an impact as hearing from a survivor directly,” said Kristine Donly, interim director of the Levine Institute for Holocaust Education at the museum, who sat on the board that developed the survey.

And so, across the country and around the world, museums and memorials are looking for ways to tell the witnesses’ stories once the witnesses are gone.

At the site of the Monument to Six Million Jewish Martyrs, the Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation has been developing an interactive memorial plaza, scheduled to open in October. Visitors will use a new app that will, among other things, feature survivors’ recorded testimonies.

In one part of the plaza, train tracks that carried prisoners to the Treblinka death camp will be embedded in the pavement. When visitors step onto the tracks, the app, using geocaching technology, will pull up videos of Philadelphia residents “who were on those very trains that led to Treblinka,” said Eszter Kutas, the remembrance foundation’s acting director.

And at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center, near Chicago, visitors can speak with one of seven holograms of survivors — a project also tested at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York. Drawing on recorded testimony, the holograms can answer questions in real time.

Visitors to the Illinois museum’s Take a Stand Center first watch a five-minute film in which a survivor introduces him- or herself. In one, Fritzie Fritzshall describes being taken to a ghetto at gunpoint during Passover, and from there to Auschwitz.

“I have so much more to tell you,” she says. “So please ask me questions.”

Then the hologram appears, “so real that our audience typically gasps when they see it,” said Susan L. Abrams, the museum’s chief executive.

“It really was as effective as hearing from a live survivor, and that surprised us,” Ms. Abrams said. “When you sit in this theater and the lights dim, everything else melts away. Our visitors truly believe that they are having this conversation with a survivor. I don’t think even we realized just how powerful it would be.”

Note 1: This Friday of May 10, Israeli snipers injured 800 Palestinians marching “To return Home”. Every Friday since the pronouncement of Trump that Jerusalem is Capital of Israel, Israel army and snipers kill and injure with live bullets Palestinian demonstrators. The latest count: 9,000 Palestinians injured and 50 killed. A million march is being prepared on Monday and Tuesday as USA is getting ready to “officially” and symbolically move its embassy from Tel Aviv.

Note 2: Two third of the over 1 million Palestinians in Gaza, the vast concentration camp, are transferred people from various parts of Palestine since 1948.

Rational Millennial? Fighting for 5 economic reforms…

 posted on January 6, 2014 (and selected as one of the top posts)

I remember when I first began to understand the issue of poverty.

We were not wealthy by any means, but we weren’t impoverished. The concept perplexed me.

One day I came up with a brilliant idea and suggested it to my dad:

“Dad, why don’t we just give money to everyone so then everyone has money?”

“We are supposed to give money, Matt. Jesus wants us to give to the needy.”

“No, I mean why doesn’t whoever MAKES the money… like wherever the money comes from… like the president… why doesn’t he just print out a bunch of money and GIVE everyone a million dollars? Then we are all millionaires and nobody will ever be poor again!”

That’s when he told me about things like taxation, and inflation, and how pricing works.

He explained that if EVERYONE suddenly has a million dollars then, in effect, nobody has a million dollars.

Having a million dollars would be like having 3 pennies. If you could end poverty by printing money and handing it out, then there wouldn’t be poverty anywhere.

And thus ended my brief flirtation with liberalism. I was six years old.

In other words, I became too mature for liberal economic theory, but I still ate Elmer’s glue during art class (a habit I’ve yet to break — the stuff is just delicious).

Not all kids develop at the same pace, though. Which is probably why someone in my generation — purporting to speak for my generation — recently penned a piece for the Rolling Stone called “Five Economic Reforms Millennial Should Be Fighting For.”

The author, Jesse Myerson, points out how us Millennials have been “especially hard hit” by the economic recession.

This, of course, is everyone’s fault but ours. Our personal debt? Well, that’s, like, because of society.

And the bankers! The bankers did this to us! You decided to take out a college loan you couldn’t afford? Maybe put a bunch of iPhones and laptops on credit? Bankers! Wall Street! The rich!

Because that’s how the young generation should approach life — powerless, whiney, looking for someone to blame. A recipe for prosperity, is it not?

This is the philosophy that Myerson espouses. And he does it while using phrases like “you know else blows?” and “as much as unemployment blows, so do jobs.”

I’ve got nothing against the guy personally. I don’t know him. I’m sure he’s a decent enough fellow.

But what he represents, and the dull, juvenile, inarticulate, “hip,” way in which he communicates it — that’s what I hate. I hate it because it’s the sort of thing that festers on the soul of my generation like a toxic mold, and it will kill us all if we don’t work to eradicate it.

His idea for “reforms” to help my generation are:

1. Give everyone a job!

It’s that easy, dude. Unemployment blows! Just sayin’. Lolz. How do you correct the problem of people not having jobs? Well, magically create a job (and a market for these new jobs) out of thin air! Easypeezy lemonsqueezy.

2. Give everyone money!

As the author notes, “jobs blow” also. So if people don’t want to work — just hand them cash!

3. Have the government seize private land and give it to people!

What could go wrong?

4. Let everyone own everything!

And by “everyone” we mean the government. See, we have to take wealth and property away from the wealthy elite, and then promptly hand control of it over to the government… which is run by wealthy elite.

Oops.

5. Public banks!

Well, the IRS already has unfettered access to your money, and now Obamacare owns the rest of you, so why not? The author makes the point that government run banks don’t make “seedy deals.”

Yes, governments totally never make seedy deals.

Government: honesty, transparency, and fairness. And unicorns.

Now, as a Millennial myself, I thought I’d offer a different perspective.

We young people can sit around begging Uncle Sam to give out jobs, money, and land for free, or we can develop a different strategy for long term economic success and security.

Here are my proposals for five economic “reforms” we, as individuals, and especially as young people, can immediately instate:

1. Don’t go to college unless you actually need to be there.

14 million people under the age of 30 have outstanding student loans. The average debt for the class of 2012 will be just under 30,000 dollars.

Meanwhile, the median income for that same age group is about 23,000 dollars. This is what happens when you take out massive loans despite having no financial assets, no job, and no coherent plan for the future. Here’s how we cure this problem:

Stop doing it.

Go to college if you NEED to go to college. Go to college if you have a PLAN for the future that makes college a NECESSITY.

Go to college if you won the megamillions jackpot at the age of 18 and can now afford to take a four year vacation. Because that’s what college is for many — not all, many — of the bright young folks who attend.

We’ve got kids bankrupting themselves for the sake of getting drunk and passing out on vomit-stained couches for the next 48 months. This is insanity.

College is a means to an end. It isn’t a destination unto itself.

Don’t go for the “experience.” You want an experience? Move out of the house and get a job. Pay your own rent. Get evicted from an apartment for failure to make a payment. Work 3 minimum wage jobs at the one time. Mop floors.

Go a winter without heat because you can’t afford to keep it on and eat at the same time. Run out into that cold, wild world and muscle your way to the top of it. THAT’S an experience.

You want to be an engineer? A doctor? An astronaut? An architect? By all means, go to college.

You want to build cars or become an electrician? Maybe a trade school is in your future.

You have absolutely no clue what you want out of life, what your talents are, or what career path best suits you? College isn’t for you.

In fact, college is an objectively BAD idea for anyone in this category. And this is a category that includes, for instance, most college students.

Don’t want debt? Then don’t borrow money. If you do borrow money, you better have a good reason. Hint: “Eh, I’ll figure it out” isn’t a good reason.

2. Don’t buy things unless you can afford them.

This is more of an addendum to point 1. But it’s a basic budgetary principle that escapes many of us.

Before you buy something, ask yourself: do I have the money to pay for this? Remember: if your debt exceeds your financial assets — you don’t have any money. And “your money” really only includes what you have leftover after your bills for the month have been paid.

It’s a good thing the news constantly reminds us about how poor we are, because there’s little evidence of any of this at America’s shopping malls and Best Buys.

It’s interesting: my generation is saddled with unemployment and college debt, yet how many of us own smart phones? Like, everyone? Those things aren’t cheap.

Something isn’t adding up here.

3. Work hard.

Will working hard guarantee you wealth and happiness? No, nothing guarantees you anything.

You might get screwed over by a vindictive boss. You might get into a horrible car accident and lose three limbs. You might die tomorrow on your way to the gym. Horrible things will happen to you. But if you’re my age and the first step in your plan for success isn’t “work my butt off,” then you have a problem.

You are a problem.

Fix it.

I suppose there might be some people out there who oversimplify and act as though hard work can achieve literally anything.

But far more common, and far more dangerous, are the naysayers who insist that you have NO control and NO say over your lot in life.

On the bright side, they offer a convenient excuse to people who’ve failed due to their own laziness, apathy, and complacency, but this also has the necessary effect of belittling and diminishing the people who’ve struggled against immeasurable odds to achieve their dreams.

So, you might feel rather charitable telling an inner city drug dealer that he is a victim of his environment and not responsible for his choices.

Now what about the guy who climbs out of the gutter to conquer and inspire the world? If the first guy isn’t responsible for his choices, neither is the second.

You just took that man’s achievements from him and turned his life story into a simple roll of Fate’s dice.

How dare you. You should be ashamed.

4. Develop a marketable skill.

Imagine a job interviewer asking you this question: “So, what are your skills?”

If you don’t have an answer, you better be charming as hell, because that’s your only chance at landing the gig.

Most of us, however, aren’t that likeable. If we want to work in a particular industry, we need to have something that we do.

Skills are honed and developed over time; this is a process that you should start before you even graduate high school. If you have a useful skill, you’ll always have a way to make money. It really is that simple.

5. Save money.

I used to think it was more fun to spend than save. Then I grew up, and began to understand the joy of making sacrifices in the short term, so that I might have some financial security in the long term.

Social Security ain’t gonna be there for us, my friends. Our parents generation will cash out and leave us in the lurch. It’s a bad hand, but it’s the one we’ve been dealt. Deal with it. Save your own money for your own future.

Well, it isn’t as sexy as free money for everyone, but this is my proposal.

The best part is that we don’t have to wait for any politician or president to make this happen. We can do this now. And we should.

And we need to.

We don’t have a choice.

Millennial, Boomer, and Gen X generations: What’s the differences?

I assume that what is meant by “Millennia generation” are those born about 2000, or most probably, the kids born about 1995 and experienced the turmoil of hearing of the drastic changes occurring to the world as we cross the second millennial  or possibly the parents who gave birth to kids at the crossing of the second millennial…

When I hear about research studies done on the Millennia generation I need to know whom the research is targeting exactly. Cheryl Swanson said in an interview with Debbie Millman that described the characteristics of Millennial generation:

First, this generation (parents) will not be caught without car seat or safety belt in the back of the car:  The parents are safety conscious…Why? Parents are giving birth later in life and have made several trips to fertility clinics:  They want their kids and are the product of cultural expectation...

Second, this generation wants pure sugar in their soda cans and not concentrate fructose corn syrup…For example, Pepsi has switched to brown sugar-water soda, and Coca-Cola has followed suit…

Third, Smoking and drinking behaviors have decreased with this “cohort” group

Fourth, their SAT scores have increased (this time Cheryl might be talking of the kids?)

Fifth, They are achievement-oriented

Sixth, They don’t want to let their parents down,

Seventh, they feel very powerful with a sense of “entitlement” confronting authority figures

Eight, they are institutionally driven and trust in authority

Ninth, they love heritage brands that has stood the test of time, such as Levi jeans, Gillette, Coke…

Millennial generation is now getting all the media attention, as the boomer and the Gen X (aged 35 to 50 by now) before them.

The Boomer generation feel that they have exclusive rights to brands, they had adopted and nurtured brands as a cult: There are no differences among the brown sugar-water soda, and yet consumers behave as a cult toward a particular brand.  Do you know that in Mexico, every person consumes Coca-Cola three times a day?

The Gen X, sandwiched between the Boomers and the millennial, exhibited skeptical tendencies toward brands.  The irony is that marketers are boomers, the advertising agencies are Gen X, and they are all trying to talk to millennial...Consequently, everything that Millennial use is branded.

Brand help focus the direction to go for millennials, to figure out their “identity“…

Cheryl said:

“There are three pillars to a brand: the functional, the sensorial experience, and mostly the emotional compelling story.  Stories about a place in culture that say: “Where we are, where we’ve been, and where we are going.  Stories that have transcended their transactional economic functions…(as long as corporation sticks to its core product and message…)

The artwork, the visual language communicates what is important to a particular consumer group.  A success brand becomes a cult, a totem, until it is accepted internationally and reverts to a sort of substitute religion…

It is very probable that with so many choices in brands, brands would devolve to wallpaper background status, instead of retaining and sustaining the brand story.

The research on Millennia generation was conducted before 2008.  It has to be reconducted and revised. Why?

First: The US millenials are Occupying Wall Street and other institutions.  The State police forces are dispersing the protesters in every major cities, using tactics learned in Israel.

Second, Obama adopted the “unlimited detention” doctrine on the prisoners of Guantanamo Bay without trials…

Third, the US has withdrawn from Iraq and is getting ready to “throw the sponge” in Afghanistan…

Fourth, the administration has a list of 2,000 “terrorists” to drone out with utmost prejudice, without any recourse to validating these targeted individuals…

Maybe the millennial were  institutionally driven and trusted in authority, but is that impression still valid? Time to creating a label for the newer “resisting” generation.

“Resisting is creating” and there is no optimism in a better future unless the spirit of resisting the conventional structure is alive and kicking…

We all want that the new generation retains its very powerful sense of “entitlement” confronting authority figures.  I suggest the term: “entitlement generation

Note 1:  Cheryl Swanson was involved in designing the Method brand, a household cleaning launched in 2001.  The Venus brand of female shaving cream positioning is revealing the “inner goddess beauty”…

Note 2: Debbie Millman published “Brand thinking and other Noble Pursuits” where she interviewed 22 famous brand designers


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

August 2020
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Blog Stats

  • 1,408,121 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 758 other followers

%d bloggers like this: