Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Nakba Day

Deal of the Century Adds “New” to the Four Thousand Year Old Name “Palestine”

The apartheid regime we know as “Israel” was built on the very ruins of Palestine and imposed a brutal regime on those who still live in their country. Millions of Palestinians still languish in refugee camps in and around Palestine, yet Israel and its allies around the world celebrate “Israeli independence.”

JERUSALEM, PALESTINE — Nakba Day — the day when Palestinians commemorate the destruction of their country and the mass killing and forced eviction of their people — is coming up, and with each passing day, another disturbing story unfolds.

Perhaps the most disturbing story so far is the plan to present Palestine with a new name, “New Palestine.” (How imaginative)

This, according to a rumored leak, is what Donald Trump and Jared Kushner are going to present to an anticipating world as part of the so-called “Deal of the Century.”

Also according to the leak, aside from a demand for Palestinians to accept a new name as part of the “Deal of the Century” — forgoing the name “Palestine,” which has been used to describe their land since the Bronze Age — the Palestinian people will have to accept that their heritage and their history will be erased and their land will be taken away for good.

In other words, what Palestinians are going to receive, according to the leak, is a new name but no country, and they will be expected to accept this or else they will be denied access to foreign aid, not only from the U.S. but other countries as well.

From elections to Gaza to Independence Day

Things move fast on the Israeli side of occupied Palestine.

Israel recently held elections, then — within a few weeks and before a new government was even formed — Israel lashed out with a deadly attack on Gaza.

Then, Israel recognized a few solemn days, the first one Holocaust Remembrance Day and the second, a day to commemorate Israeli soldiers who had fallen in battle. Then Israelis were off to celebrate “Israeli Independence.”

On the Palestinian side, no sooner does one tragedy end than a second one follows, no time for the fresh blood on the ground to dry before more is spilled.

The lovely face of 16-year-old Fatima Hijazi, shot by an Israeli sniper, is still fresh in people’s hearts when more, even younger casualties are reported. Palestinians go from mourning to mourning with no end in sight.

Over the past several years, a new phenomenon has risen, a joint memorial service where Israelis and Palestinians join together to commemorate their fallen loved ones.

While the idea of such an event may seem appealing to some, the moral equivalency it tries to create between the victims of the violence and those who lost their lives while perpetuating the violence is troubling.

However, in the political climate that now exists among Israelis, this is considered progressive. While this event was permitted to proceed, right-wing gangs came by to protest the initiative and lashed out with obscenities at the participants: “Sons of whores, may God take all of you stinking lefties! Death to Arabs!” and on and on.

Celebrating independence

A custom that can only be described as insensitive, if not outright cruel, and which has been in place since Palestine was destroyed, is the celebration of Israeli independence. Just as Israeli elections were held on the day that Palestinians commemorate the massacre at Deir Yassin, Israel callously celebrates a day of independence at the same time as Palestinians mourn the loss of their country.

The apartheid regime we know as “Israel” was built on the very ruins of Palestine and imposed a brutal regime on those who still live in their country. Millions of Palestinians still languish in refugee camps in and around Palestine, yet Israel and its allies around the world celebrate.

Israel Memorial Day

A young Israeli girl plays on a tank during an Israeli Memorial Day ceremony in Latrun, Israel, May 8, 2019. Oded Balilty | AP

Israelis are not the indigenous people of Palestine. What we know today as “Israelis” are people who came to colonize mostly during the time of the British Mandate in Palestine, and they did so largely with the assistance of the British government.

The British mandate over Palestine, which was, in reality, an occupation of the country, facilitated the creation of the Zionist apartheid regime in Palestine. The Jews who came to colonize and settle in Palestine were never oppressed or occupied; in fact, they were privileged. The Jewish settlements in Palestine had services like running water and electricity long before many of the Palestinian communities did, and they were assisted by the British in every possible way.

The biblical Zionist narrative

The name “New Palestine” becomes even more absurd in light of the fact that the name Palestine was, “first documented in the late Bronze Age, about 3,200 years ago.”

Furthermore, according to a new book by historian Nur Masalha, “the name Palestine is the conventional name used between 450 B.C. and 1948 A.D. to describe the geographical region between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River.” These quotes are from Masalha’s Palestine, A Four Thousand Year History, published by Zed Books in 2018.

Palestine: A Four Thousand Year HistoryMasalha — professor of history at the London University School of Oriental and African Studies, or SOAS — takes on the difficult task of seriously, scientifically, and one may add successfully, challenging the prevailing narrative regarding Palestine.

This is clearly no simple feat but it is one in which the historian Masalha succeeds in a manner that is both admirable and convincing. (Just peruse the old pictures of Palestinians and Palestine before and after British mandated power)

Unfortunately, odds are neither Jared Kushner or Benjamin Netanyahu — the two men who are most likely to be behind the “New Palestine” and the “Deal of the Century” — will ever read this important history book.

Revealing aspects of Palestinian history that Zionists would prefer remain in the dark, Masalha’s book is essential reading. Until the history of Palestine is told and the cruel reality in which Palestinians live today is exposed, Palestine will never be free.

Miko Peled is an author and human rights activist born in Jerusalem. He is the author of “The General’s Son. Journey of an Israeli in Palestine,” and “Injustice, the Story of the Holy Land Foundation Five.”

Note: I posted many articles on Palestine and Palestinians on my blog adonis49@wordpress.com

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Tidbits and notes posted on FB and Twitter. Part 226

Note: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. I pay attention to researched documentaries and serious links I receive. The page of backlog opinions and events is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains a month-old events that are worth refreshing your memory

AIPAC’s network of political action committees, nearly all have deceptive names. Who could possibly know that the Delaware Valley Good Government Association in Philadelphia, San Franciscans for Good Government in California, Cactus PAC in Arizona, Beaver PAC in Wisconsin, and even Icepac in New York are really pro-Israel PACs under deep cover?
Anyone can ask one of their representatives in Congress for a chart prepared by the Congressional Research Service, a branch of the Library of Congress, that shows Israel received $62.5 billion in direct foreign aid from fiscal year 1949 through fiscal year 1996. Not counting the grants and investment by Evangelical Fundamentalist Zionists
For every dollar the U.S. spent on an African, it spent $250.65 on an Israeli, and for every dollar it spent on someone from the Western Hemisphere outside the United States, it spent $214 on an Israeli.
The UN general Assembly declared by a crushing majority that Zionism is a form of racism in 1975. It abrogated it in 1991. Why? US congress has declared Jerusalem Capital of Israel in 1992
Congressional Research Service
On Nov. 22, 1974, the UN General Assembly recognized the right of Palestinians for a sovereign auto-determination
On Nov. 29, 2012, the UN General Assembly attributed to Palestine the status of “Non member State” that allowed it to cease  the penal International Court and to sign treaties.
Israeli “Arabs” (Palestinians) who are disloyal to the State of Israel should have their heads chopped off, Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman said at an elections conference at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya. “Those who are against us, there’s nothing to be done – we need to pick up an ax and cut off his head,” Lieberman said. “Otherwise we won’t survive here.”
Avigdor Lieberman: “Citizens of the State of Israel who raise a black flag on Nakba Day (displacement of the Palestinians as Israel got recognized as a State in 1948 by a single vote) – from my perspective, they can leave, and I’m very happily willing to donate them to Abu Mazen,” he said, referring to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas.

You woke up early on a Sunday and spent the day hiking. You returned home exhausted and went to bed, not even finding the energy to wash…How many tasks did you achieve this day?

Suppose you did take pictures for your blog, or did interviews or talked to a few people to describe your trip for your blog to share with readers…How many tasks did you achieve this day?

You are preparing for an exam or working on a homework and did nothing but focusing on these assignments…You ask your mom to prepare you something to eat while studying…How many tasks did you achieve today?

I did the count of the many kinds of task I perform during a day, and I figured out that I finish about 3 tasks per hour, on average, during my waking hours. A few tasks require an hour-long focus, and many are mainly maintenance tasks to survive and keep healthy and alert, and be of some benefit to the household…

Kamal Nader and Hicham Halaoui shared ‎نوبة تود‎’s post.

The grandest Palestinian kid: shot in the heart by Israel and still standing tall and looking straight at the murderers

Image may contain: 1 person, standing

 

 

 

Disloyal Israeli Arabs should be beheaded: Israel Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman

Meaning Palestinians who were granted an Israeli citizenship (identity card and passport) but not enjoying the same rights as the Jews.

Israeli Arabs who are disloyal to the State of Israel should have their heads chopped off, Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman said at an elections conference at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya this week.

Ahmad Abd shared this link

This is the Israeli foreign minister of:

– The icon of democracy in the Middle East…
– The example that Arab states must follow…
– The best ally in the region of the civilized world…

– LAST and not least: the father of ISIS and al-Nusra…

See More

MK Ahmad Tibi compares Yisrael Beiteinu head’s vision to a ‘Jewish ISIS’; foreign minister also reiterates support for transfer.
haaretz.com

“Whoever’s with us should get everything – up to half the kingdom,” Lieberman said Sunday, in a reference to King Ahaseurus’ pledge to Queen Esther as described in the Book of Esther, which tells the story of the Purim holiday celebrated last week.

But Israeli Arabs who are disloyal to the state deserve a different fate, the chairman of Yisrael Beiteinu said at the “Voting for Democracy – 2015 Elections” election conference, Channel 2 News reported.

“Those who are against us, there’s nothing to be done – we need to pick up an ax and cut off his head,” Lieberman said. “Otherwise we won’t survive here.”

Prominent Israeli Arab MK Ahmad Tibi, who is No. 4 on the Arab parties’ Joint List ticket, suggested a situation like that described by Lieberman would result in a Jewish version of the Islamic State group, also known as ISIS or ISIL.

Joint List “will remove racists’ and fascists’ heads only through democratic means – bringing as many [Knesset] seats as possible and active participation in the election,” The Jerusalem Post quoted Tibi as saying Monday.

“The stronger we are, the weaker the Jewish Islamic State will be.”

Lieberman also reiterated his position advocating the transfer of at least some of Israel’s Arab citizens. (to where? Gaza again?)

“There is no reason for the people in the town of Umm al-Fahm (Fa7m) to be part of the State of Israel,” Lieberman said about a northern Israeli town populated by Arab citizens of Israel, according to the Channel 2 report.

“Citizens of the State of Israel who raise a black flag on Nakba Day (displacement of the Palestinians as Israel got recognized as a State in 1948 by a single vote) – from my perspective, they can leave, and I’m very happily willing to donate them to Abu Mazen,” he said, referring to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas.

The road to Palestine: Diary of “May 15 Day” to the borders with Israel 

Who is Moe Ali Nayel? I read a post on one of the social platforms by Moe Ali Nayel , a Palestinian journalist and fixer based in Beirut, and decided to edit it and rearrange a few paragraphs: Important eye-witness diaries have to be republished, over and over again.

“I grew up in Lebanon during the civil war, particularly in south Lebanon.  Israeli occupation of south Lebanon lasted over 18 years before the Zionist State was forced to withdraw without negotiation by the Lebanese resistance.

During that time, a revolutionary song by Julia Butros, “Wayn al-Malayeen?” (where are the millions), was continually heard on the airwaves. But as a child, I never understood what she meant when she sang “Where are the millions? Where are the Arab people?”

In 2006, as the Israeli incursion in south Lebanon dragged on for 33 days, I heard the song again. I was 25: this time I understood what it meant and that line kept playing endlessly in my head throughout the war.Eventually, Israel vacated Lebanon and admitted defeat.

Last Sunday, on the way to the border at the town of Maroun al Rass, the bus driver played that song. In light of the Arab revolutions that are happening at the moment, millions of Arabs have taken to the streets to demand their freedom, to demand their right,s and to speak out for the first time (at least since I have been alive).

On 15 May, the same millions took to the streets, only this time to demand the liberation of Palestine: their freedom, their rights for a State and the implementation of UN resolution 194 for the Right of Return of the Palestinians to Palestine.

That day at 7:30 am, we gathered in front of Mar Elias Palestinian refugee camp in Beirut. There were five packed buses and on the street there were about a hundred others waiting for more buses. Finally, we learned there were no more buses and we would have to rent additional ones. I got into our rented bus full of enthusiasm and good vibes; the journey back to Palestine had started. The crowd on the bus was an interesting mix of people of different nationalities and as we sat down we were all Palestine, we were all Palestinians.

For weeks I had anxiously awaited 15 of May, what we are already calling the beginning of the Third Palestinian Intifada. Many people had started referring to May 15 as such on social networks.  I loved the sound of Third Palestinian Intifada and so this is how I would refer to it every time I speak of that memorable Day.

However, 15 May is the Nakba Day (catastrophe) commemoration: on this date in 1948, we remember that more than 750,000 Palestinians were forced out of their homes, their land, to transfer to  new countries and for Jews coming from everywhere to relocated in our land.

To me, Palestine was and still is the central cause in the Arab world, and I always believed that the liberation of Palestine would not happen before the liberation of the Arab people from the corrupt ruling dictatorships.

The western States like to call these dictators and absolute monarchs the “Arab moderates”, but in reality this means Arab puppets. Today the Arab world is changing and the Arab people are revolting, and while they are revolting they have not forgotten about Palestine, or the suffering and occupation their Palestinian brethren are going through.

In closely following the Arab uprisings since the protests in Tunisia started, I have always seen at least one Palestinian flag among the protesters in every Arab country. Palestine has always been present during the protests. Palestine has always been present in the hearts and conscience of the Arab people. The “malayeen” or millions are speaking now and their united voice is reaching the sky.

Yesterday, the Arab people spoke again: the people want to liberate Palestine; the people want to return to Palestine.

The road to Palestine

The trip from Beirut took longer than it should, along the coast to the south.  Hundreds of buses and cars displayed Palestinian flags, and on the sides of the roads big billboards read: “May 15th: the march to return.” I have never felt so delighted looking at a billboard before.

On the windy road from Nabatiyeh to Maroun al-Rass, the endless line of buses relentlessly moved forward, people on windows waving to each other and flashing the V for victory sign. We felt like we were really going back to Palestine. On the bus, three Palestinian friends and I jokingly, but sincerely, started making plans about where in Jerusalem we were going to have a coffee, or should we just go to Haifa and enjoy the beach there, we teased, believing it somehow.

As the bus wound through the lush green valleys of the south, blooming with flowers and life, I couldn’t help but notice many buses with Syrian license plates. “Had these people come all the way from Syria?” I wondered. But no, I was told there were not enough buses in Lebanon, so some had been rented from Syria.

Contrary to our original plans, the bus had to stop in Bint Jbeil, the largest town in the region, a few kilometers away from our destination — the border at Maroun al-Ras. The village had been turned into a big parking lot for buses converging to destination; buses carrying people from a dozen refugee camps all over Lebanon and the many Lebanese who wanted to join the march to the border.

We jumped out of the bus and without asking how we would get to the border, we found ourselves joining thousands of people walking through the green fields and climbing mountains as a short-cut to our shared destination.

It was approximately a five kilometer-walk , actually a hiking trip. It was beautiful to see endless lines of people marching from different directions in the green land. Next to me were Palestinian families who had brought the children along and dressed them up for the occasion.

There were old women and men who struggled to climb the steep hills, and there was a great spirit of solidarity among the people as everyone gave a hand, everyone offered to help, and everyone smiled.

My wife and I slowed our pace at one point to listen to an old Palestinian man leaning on a cane. He was walking with his grandson and telling him the story of the time he had had to leave Palestine and carry his nine-year-old sister while escaping to Lebanon over these very same mountains and paths. The old man spoke to his grandson of the beauty of Palestine and described how their home looked.

Finally, as we gradually drew closer to the border, he told the young boy, “Soon you will go and see Palestine, the most beautiful country I have ever seen; it’s where we come from. It’s our land.”

Shooting from the valley

We finally got to Maroun al-Ras, a public space on top of a mountain overlooking occupied Palestine. There were thousands of people scattered all over the mountain top and a big screen was broadcasting what was happening down in the valley. Before we could properly take in our surroundings I heard shooting, four or five shots from below us in the valley.

I told my wife the Israelis are shooting,. A minute later, a person on the microphone called for the ambulance to bring down stretchers to the fence. I asked what was happening and people told me four martyrs had fallen and more than twenty were injured.

A wave of people stretched from the park on the top of the hill all the way down to the border fence. I found myself sliding on that wave, stopping every once in a while to catch my breath and wondering whether I should stay where I was or keep going down to the fence. I could not contain the desire to join the thousands on the fence already throwing stones across the border. From a distance, the stones looked like white birds diving to the other side.

I finally made it to what they were calling the “second line”, approximately 500 meters away from the border fence. There were ambulances parked nearby, and the Lebanese army had formed a human chain to prevent more people from joining those at the border fence.

Many Palestinians, young men and women, kept insisting on breaking the chain the Lebanese army had formed, wanting to join their brothers and sisters on the front line. Watching the faces of the Lebanese soldiers, all I could see was confusion and panic, but they were not losing any chance to threaten and intimidate the protesters with their raised batons and sticks.

All their guns were directed to the sky

Standing in front of the army were a few Palestinian men pleading with the raging people not to take it out on the Lebanese army. “This is not what we were here for,” they shouted over the chants.  The knowledge that the land in between was littered with mines did not stop the people: people kept breaking through the chain and sprinting to join the front line.

One group of courageous young women broke the chain of men and ran towards the front line and everyone cheered them on. All this time, the Israelis were shooting, a burst of two or three shots rang out frequently, and every time they shot we saw the stretchers gathering new bodies.

At 4 pm, we decided to climb up the steep mountain and walk back to catch our bus. After a couple minutes of walking, I noticed the Lebanese army moving towards the front line, to the fence.  The soldiers were after the protesters who started loudly chanting “Palestine! Palestine!” As the army made their way to the very front it looked like they had decided that the protest was over.  Suddenly, with no warning, the Lebanese army on the front and the second line started firing thousands of rounds into the air.

All their guns where directed to the sky, but the amount of shooting terrorized everyone who was there. We all started sprinting up the steep mountain; a random man pulled my arm and dragged me up with him as I struggled to keep up on my feet.

The firing intensified and there were the same waves of people scrambling and running in panic. Next to me there were lost children, crying, wanting their parents; an old man ran out of breath, crouched down; I saw an old Palestinian woman up the mountain with tears running down her face.

Looking back down to where the second line was, I could only see a line of soldiers with their M16 rifles to the sky, shooting nonstop. It was like something out of  horror movies. But something even more terrorizing happened in the middle of the shooting:  As the Lebanese soldiers fired their guns, I heard deeper shots coming from the Israeli side and bullets whizzed by me; I took a dive to the ground.

The way the Lebanese army decided to end the event made me ask myself ” who is the enemy here?”

Nothing to lose but our chains

The “March of return to Palestine”  harvested at least ten persons dead in Lebanon, five in Ain Shams (Syria) and another dozen on the borders with the West Bank and Gaza; over 300 were seriously injured by Israeli snipers.  The Palestinians in Egypt were prevented from reaching the border.

People who normally don’t care about Palestine and enjoy a life of apathy, indifference, and consumerism asked me today: “what did you achieve? What did you change? Was it worth it the death of tens of people?”

My answer is “after yesterday, things will not be the same as before 15 May”. Just like after the suicide of Muhammad Bouazizi in Tunisia, things are not the same as before in the Arab world. The Arab people, us, the Arab youth, we are not going to let the status quo continue, we are not going to be humiliated by our own people anymore. We are not going to let Palestine and the Palestinian people be humiliated and tortured as they breathe.

We are freedom-loving people and we won’t live anymore on empty promises from our corrupt governments, governments using Palestine as a pretext to repress us while they enjoy robbing us from our dignity and labor.

We won’t let rotten governments continue to make sure Israel is safe and sound, enjoying the beautiful land of Palestine, while hundreds of thousands of Palestinian refugees live in inhumane conditions in the camps.

How do you expect a Palestinian refugee to see his land being enjoyed by the Israeli occupation and not react to that? We, the Arab people, the Arab youth, the millions, have decided that we have nothing to lose but our chains and that Palestine is our prize.

I saw yesterday how much the people want to free Palestine, how much they want to return to Palestine. The Arab people are here, the Arab rage is here, the determined malayeen are here.

Moe Ali Nayel is a journalist and fixer based in Beirut.

Fairer view on the Palestinian rights and cause: The Economist butts in

On May 17th, The Economist published the article “Here comes your non-violent resistance“. I will repost it with a few editing, and add a few comments.

“For many years, we’ve heard American commentators bemoan the violence of the Palestinian national movement.  They would say “If only Palestinians had learned the lessons of Gandhi and Martin Luther King, they’d have had their recognized State long ago”.

Or the American commentators would say: “Surely, no Israeli government would have violently suppressed a non-violent Palestinian national liberation movement, seeking only the universally recognised right of self-determination”.

Palestinian commentators and organizers, including Fadi Elsalameen and Moustafa Barghouthi, have spent the last couple of years pointing out that these complaints resolutely ignore the actual and growing Palestinian non-violent resistance movement.

The first intifada, which broke out in 1987, was initially as close to non-violent as could be reasonably expected. For the most part, it consisted of general strikes and protest marches. In addition, there was a fair amount of kids throwing rocks, and a few continuing threat of low-level terrorism, mainly from organisations based abroad. the Israelis conflated the autochthonous protest movement with “terrorism” and responded brutally.  The first intifada quickly lost its non-violent character.

It is not that different from what has happened over the past couple of months in Libya: It shows that it’s very hard to keep a non-violent movement going non-violent, as the government you’re demonstrating against, subjects you to gunfire for a sustained period of time.

In any case, if you’re among those who have made the argument that Israelis would give Palestinians a State if only the Palestinians would learn to employ Gandhi tactics of non-violent protest, it appears your moment of truth has arrived.  What happened on Nakba Day (the day Israel chased out the Palestinians from their villages and homes to seek refuge in the neighboring States) was Israel’s “nightmare scenario”:  Masses of Palestinians marching (from all the bordering States to Israel), unarmed, towards the borders of the Jewish State, demanding the redress of their decades-old national grievance.”

Peter Beinart writes that this represents “Israel’s Palestinian Arab Spring”: the tactics of mass non-violent protests that brought down the governments of Tunisia and Egypt.  The same mass uprising that are threatening to bring down the regimes in Libya, Yemen and Syria, are now being used in the Palestinian cause.

We have an opportunity to see how Americans will react. “We’ve asked the Palestinians to lay down their arms. We’ve told them their lack of a State is their own fault; if only they would embrace non-violence, a reasonable and unprejudiced world would see the merit of their claims”. Over the weekend, tens of thousands of them did just that, and it seems likely to continue.

If crowds of tens of thousands of non-violent Palestinian protestors continue to march, and if Israel continues to shoot at them, what will we do? Will we make good on our rhetoric, and press Israel to give the Palestinians their State? Or will it turn out that our paeans to non-violence were just cynical tactics in an amoral international power contest, staged by militaristic Israeli and American right-wing groups whose elective affinities lead them to shape a common narrative of the alien Arab/Muslim threat? Will we even bother to acknowledge that the Palestinians are protesting non-violently? Or will we soldier on with the same empty decades-old rhetoric, now drained of any truth or meaning, because it protects established relationships of power?

What will it take to make Americans recognise that the real Martin Luther King-style non-violent Palestinian protestors have arrived, and that Israeli soldiers are shooting them with real bullets?”

A few comments:  The first non-violent Intifada pressured Itzhak Rabin to signing an agreement with Arafat, who was residing in Tunisia at the time.  The second Intifada was crushed in blood by Ariel Sharon in 2002.  Actually, Sharon entered the camp of Jenine and the Israeli tanks run over live Palestinian civilians and children.  Sharon finished the job by poisoning Yasser Arafat and imposing a total curfew on Ramallah that lasted 6 months.

On May 15, 2011, Israeli snipers shot to kill in the head and chest Palestinian marchers on the borders.  Over 20 civilian Palestinians were killed, point-blank with real bullets and over 300 were seriously injured on the borders with Lebanon, Syria (the Golan Heights), West Bank, and Gaza.

Palestine was partitioned into a Jewish and a Palestinian/Arab States in 1947.  Is not partitioning a recognition of a State?  Why the Palestinians had to wait till 2011 for the UN to vote in September for a Palestinian State?  Israel occupied more Palestinian lands in 1948, before the UN recognized the State of Israel.  Should people use brute force to occupy lands and demand the UN to recognize new lands captured by force?  What Israel and the UN call the 1967 borders, lands occupied after the 1967 war, are actually forgetting that Israel had occupied lands in surplus of what Palestine had been partitioned initially.

The US, the UN, Israel may wish that the borders of 1967 will satisfy the Palestinians.  Tough luck:  The UN declaration #194 demands the right of Palestinians to return to their lands, all the lands, before 1947.  The Palestinians have the right to return to their original homes, towns, villages, and get remunerated for lost gains and suffering.


adonis49

adonis49

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