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13 of the funniest Egyptian proverbs and sayings

How common with your idioms?

Egyptian society has its own set of popular proverbs and sayings, passed down from earlier generations and protected like a prized cultural possession, but Egyptians manage to make proverbs a lot more fun.

Noha Medhat posted

While the sayings often express truths or offer valuable advice, sometimes they make no sense at all or are just so ridiculously funny that you forget the point they’re trying to make, however valid that point may be. These are some of the craziest.

1. “Emshi Fe Ganaza Wala Temshi Fe Gawaza”

Photo source: quickmeme.com

Photo source: quickmeme.com

The proverb “walk in a funeral but don’t walk into a marriage” could possibly mean that you shouldn’t get involved into someone else’s marriage, or that you shouldn’t arrange a marriage.

Either way, why are both of those worse than getting involved in a funeral? We’ll never know.

2.”Ya Wakhed El-Erd Ala Maloh Yeroh El-Mal We Yeod El-Erd Ala Haloh”

Photo source: memegenerator.net

Photo source: memegenerator.net

This proverb “If you take the monkey for money, the money will go away and the monkey will stay” basically means you shouldn’t marry for money, which is valid advice that just happens to be wrapped up in a ridiculous sentence.

3.”En kan Habibak Asal Matlhasoush Kolo”

Photo source: memegenerator.net

Photo source: memegenerator.net

“If your sweetheart is honey, don’t lick it all” is often used in situations when a loved one is being taken for granted, as you would take for granted of a jar of honey apparently.

4. “Temot El-Raa’sa We Westaha Beylaa’b”

Photo source: memegen.com

Photo source: memegen.com

“The belly dancer dies while her waist is still moving” is the funnier Egyptian version of “old habits die hard”.

5. “Ekfei El-Edra Ala Famaha Tetlaa El-Bent Le Omaha”

Photo source: imgflip.com

Photo source: imgflip.com

Turn over the jar and the girl becomes like her mother” is one of the most widely used Egyptian proverbs in situations when a girl acts like her mother. But what does the jar have to do with that?

6. “Labes El-Bosa Tebaa’ Arousa”

Photo source: memecrunch.com

Photo source: memecrunch.com

It says “dress up the stick and it becomes a bride”, which could mean that looks can be deceiving or perhaps it cautions against false advertising? Interpretations are open to suggestions.

7. “Alil El-Bakht Yelaa’i El-Adm Fel Kersha”

Photo source: quickmeme.com

Photo source: quickmeme.com

It says “the unlucky one finds even bones in tender meat”, which is a popular Middle Eastern dish. The proverb is used when something unfortunate happens.

So instead of comforting the “unlucky” person, this doomed saying tells them that they can’t get away from bad luck!

8. “Ya Dakhel Ben El Basala We Eshretha Ma Yenobak Ela Sanetha”

Photo source: memegenerator.net

Photo source: memegenerator.net

“If you get between an onion and its peel you won’t get anything except its foul smell” is also an Egyptian version of “Keep your nose out of my business”.

9. “El Yetgawez Omi Aoloh Ya Ami”

Photo source: memegenerator.net

Photo source: memegenerator.net

“The one who marries my mother, I call him my uncle” is used in situations when you are forced to deal with someone you don’t want to deal with, so if you can’t beat them, join them!

10. “El Arousa Lel Arees Wel Gary Lel Mataees”

Photo source: quickmeme.com

Photo source: quickmeme.com

The bride gets a groom and everyone else becomes miserable” is a proverb that basically means weddings are unhappy occasions for everyone except the newly weds. But why?

11. “Ya Meamen Lel Regal Ya Memaen Lel Mayah Fel Gherbal”

Photo source: diylol.com

Photo source: diylol.com

“If you trust men, you trust water in a sieve” tells you all men can’t be trusted, or no one at all can be trusted, it’s not entirely clear.

12. “En Sarat Esraa’ Gamal We En Asha’t Esha’ Amar”

Photo source: quickmeme.com

Photo source: quickmeme.com

“If you’re going to steal, steal a camel and if you’re going to love, love someone as beautiful as the moon”. So basically it means live life to the fullest, or just steal a camel.

13. “Seketnaloh Dakhal Be Homaroh”

Photo source: quickmeme.com

Photo source: quickmeme.com

We let him be so he came in with his donkey” is a popular proverb that means don’t let someone walk all over you or take advantage of you. The donkey’s role in this is not clear.

 

Arab cinema snatched the spotlight at the 2016 Berlin International Film Festival.

The Berlinale Festival recently concluded after running from Feb. 11 to 21.

More than 10 Arab films participated in the Berlinale’s Forum and Forum Expanded programs this year

Not only have a notably large number of Arab films screened to approving audiences throughout this year’s event, but many of them have also won significant awards at the prestigious event.

 
Tunisian, Saudi, Palestinian, Lebanese and Egyptian directors snatched the spotlight at Berlinale.
stepfeed.com

The Tunisian film “Inhebek Hedi,” the work of Tunisian filmmaker Mohamed Ben Attia, received two of the Berlinale’s top honors.

Attia’s debut feature film, a thoughtful love story about identity and independence in Tunisian society, won the Best First Feature Award.

Its leading man, Majd Mastoura, also received the prestigious Silver Bear for Best Actor for his role as Hedi.

Palestinian director Mahdi Fleifel’s portrayal of a young refugee struggling to make a life for himself in Lebanon’s Ain El-Helweh camp was also honored.

A Man Returned” won the Silver Bear Jury Prize for Short Film.

The filmmaker used to be a refugee himself and previously made an award-winning documentary about his own experience. The short film was also selected as the Berlin Short Film Nominee for the European Film Awards.

As for the prizes of the Ecumenical Jury, Saudi filmmaker Mahmoud Sabbagh‘s well-received romantic comedy “Barakah Yoqabil Barakah” (Barakah Meets Barakah) won the jury’s Forum Prize.

The film, a comedic love story serving as a social commentary on the lives of young people in Saudi Arabia, shared the prize with Danish production “Les Sauteurs” (Those Who Jump) – a film that also highlights the plight of Europe-bound refugees.

Additionally, Egyptian filmmaker Tamer El-Said’s feature film “Akher Ayam El-Madina” (In the Last Days of the City) won the Caligari Film Prize.

The film, which looks at a young filmmaker’s struggle to complete a film about Cairo, was the only Egyptian film to participate in the 2016 Berlinale Forum.

Lebanese filmmaker Maher Abi Samra’s documentary “Makhdoumin” (A Maid for Each), which looks at the legal system that controls the lives of Lebanon’s foreign domestic workers, won the Peace Film Prize.

More than 10 Arab films participated in the Berlinale’s Forum and Forum Expanded programs this year, in addition to the ones which participated in the official competitions, marking an especially remarkable year for Arab cinema’s presence in Berlin.


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