Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Palestinian State

 

Notes and tidbits posted on FB and Twitter. Part 136

Note: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. I pay attention to researched documentaries and serious links I receive. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains a month-old events that are worth refreshing your memory.

The battle-cry on Jerusalem crisis: Pressure US Congress to rescind its law of 1995 on Jerusalem, the Capital of Israel. Otherwise, UN will postpone indefinitely the creation of a Palestinian State with East Jerusalem as Capital

Our existential enemy is Zionist controlled US Congress. As Zionism already control US Federal Reserve Bank

Is it just an impression? BBC and Euronews are creating side news to avoid coverage of Jerusalem crisis?

As usual, the colonial powers prefer to rely on regimes’ positions instead of the people emotions and opinions

The latest declaration On Jerusalem turned out too monstrous and unilaterally smug for the people in the “Arab” and Islamic countries to swallow.

Lebanon is leading politically the resistance in the Jerusalem crisis: Massive active demonstration in front of US embassy.  Foreign minister Jobran Bassil strong practical recommendations in Arab Summit in Cairo, and Hezbollah monster demonstration this Monday with Nasr Allah delivering a second speech, and Parliament that met on Friday to denounce Trump reckless declaration

There are maps of Palestine of 1920, 1947, 1949, the Oslo II of 1995, the Wye Plantation of 1998, the Charm el-Cheikh of 1999, the Camp David map including Jerusalem, the Taba I and Taba II, the two Sharon’s plans of 2001, including Jerusalem. No wonder these are never displayed: these Swiss cheese subdivisions and the implantation of Jewish colonies would speak louder than any article.

Beir Zeit university (in Ramallah?) was closed for 4 years by Israel during the second Palestinian “Intifada” in 1996. Palestinians holding Israeli passport demonstrated against the social injustices. The Indian Zubin Mehta, Israel’s Philharmonic chief orchestra, attended this cultural and musical event among the Palestinians.

Sanchuniaton of Berytus (Beirut)  wrote “Phoenicia History” and is credited as the “Father of History“, centuries before Herodotus

Most probably, expecting that the next person you meet will be as open to possibility as you are might just make it happen.

Porphyrius of Tyre  wrote “Treatise on the soul” and the commentaries on “The Dialogue of Plato“.  He was for Plotinus, Aristotle and Homer what Plato was to Socrates.

Notes and tidbits posted on FB and Twitter. Part 130

Note 1: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains months-old events that are worth refreshing your memory.

There are two viable solutions for the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, short of exterminating one party or most probably both, that has been spreading death, disabilities, miseries, indignities and humiliation since 1920.

From a psychological necessity, a Palestinian State will make them feel that persistent resistance and countless “martyrs” for re-establishing their rights as legitimate and independent people have brought fruits, as any genuine national resistance ultimately should.

It would be inevitable that the Palestinian State be guaranteed a neutrality status (no preemptive wars within and outside its borders) by the world community and the regional powers (Like in Switzerland?).

Mago of Carthage wrote the masterful 28 volumes on agricultureTreatise on Agriculture” and considered by the Romans as the “Father of Agriculture”

Pythagoras’ mother was Phoenician and she sailed from the island of Samus to Lebanon Afka Temple in order for her son to receive the lustral consecration (baptized according to the rite that is still performed in Lebanon).

Il apparait que, tant que tu lis passionement, si la Mort est de passage, Il se penchera pour lire ton livre. Tant que tu lis, la Mort te protege

Pour briser les moules, il faut d’abord les connaitre. On apprend toujours les methodes conventionelles: c’est l’ecole.

L’effet tunnel: Voir le monde a travers une longue-vue, se trouver a l’exterieur des choses et la vie. Ca s’appelle l’ angoissse, le stress.

Around the world, a growing body of evidence is showing that people with lower levels of stress and higher levels of mental well-being are more creative, more productive and take less time off work.

White males coping with financially difficult times (the poorer classes) view firearms as “morally and emotionally restorative” to society’s problems.

My second impression of the USA is that the citizen projects an attitude of positive happiness to life; he smiles, he is friendly, and he is conscious of his value. (Einstein as he landed in the late 40’s)

The Europeans demonstrate critical minds and absence of generosity and compassion. The European asks a lot from his entertainments and readings. (Einstein as he landed in the late 40’s)

So far, Iranian mullahs have been consistent in safeguarding the territorial integrity in the Middle-East. Saudi Kingdom has been consistent in the last 90 years of executing the plans of the power of Evils (US expansionist policies, Israel apartheid regime and extremist religious sects)).

Do tell us Saad Hariri when you board your private jet, so we can locate you in time of difficulties

Yalla, yi teer bi doun ma yesta2zen majless al wouzarat wa President saaret min khabar kaan

Don’t trust their rhetoric: Blatant hypocrisy of these Senators and Congressmen

Those US Senators and Congressmen voted in 1995 to have Jerusalem Capital of Israel

Zionism infiltrated the Evangelical sects in the USA. Since 1915 the USA has been the instigator for establishing the State of Israel, by pressuring England in WWI to  recognize a land for the Jews in Palestine in 1917. Over 200,000 US soldiers died in that war and many fold from the “Spanish Flu” once they returned home

The battle-cry on Jerusalem crisis: Pressure US Congress to rescind its law of 1995 of Jerusalem Capital of Israel. Otherwise, UN will postpone indefinitely the creation of a Palestinian State with East Jerusalem as Capital. This will go counter to the world community desires to put to rest this century old situstion.

There are maps of Palestine of 1920, 1947, 1949, the Oslo II of 1995, the Wye Plantation of 1998, the Charm el-Cheikh of 1999, the Camp David map including Jerusalem, the Taba I and Taba II, the two Sharon’s plans of 2001, including Jerusalem. No wonder these are never displayed: these Swiss cheese subdivisions and the implantation of Jewish colonies would speak louder than any article.

 

Devil in the details: Israelis diverge on details of a Palestinian State

Would Israeli support for a Palestinian state (60%) be dramatically lower when they are presented with specific details rather than being asked to support the basic idea?
Rightwing think-tank jumped at the occasion with a biased poll to confirms the argument that Israelis who support theory of two-state solution recoil from concrete details.
in Jerusalem in The Guardian, Monday 20 October
 Jerusalem
The Jordan Valley
The Jordan Valley, which Israel considers to be its eastern border. Photograph: Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images

A poll has found that 75% of Israeli Jews oppose the creation of a Palestinian state within the pre-1967 borders if it means withdrawing Israeli troops from the Jordan Valley.

The survey, conducted by a rightwing thinktank headed by a political ally of the Israeli prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, makes for stark reading, contradicting previous polls showing up to 60% of Israelis in favour of a two-state solution.

The Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, is making a concerted diplomatic push for a UN security council resolution seeking an end to the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories by November 2016.

Of the 60% of those polled who described themselves as rightwing, opposition to a Palestinian state within the pre-1967 lines rose to almost 92%, while 72% of those who identified as leftwing would support it.

That opposition rises further still if the issue of dividing Jerusalem is included, with 40% of leftwingers opposing the division of Jerusalem.

The poll was commissioned by a think-tank run by a former policy advisor to Netanyahu and initially published in the free newspaper owned by the Las Vegas casino owner Sheldon Adelson, one of the Israeli prime minister’s biggest backers.

Leftwing commentators suggested the polling was likely to be an accurate reflection of Israeli public opinion.

“The poll published in Israel Hayom is obviously meant to serve Netanyahu’s agenda,” said Mairav Zonszein, writing for the +972 website.

“And while it is dangerous to rely solely on a single poll to back up any claim, this specific poll – no matter how flawed or skewed – happens to be an accurate reflection of the Israeli government’s policies, much of its rhetoric, and the reality on the ground.”

Although historical polling has suggested solid Israeli support for a two-state solution, Zonszein argues that the latest poll more truly reflects both how Israelis vote for political parties – and those parties’ agendas – and how they talk about the peace process.

Even though many polls over the years have shown and still show that a majority of Jewish Israelis support a two-state solution based more or less along the 1967 border with land swaps, such sentiment is reflected less and less in the way Israelis vote and talk. This new poll seems to provide a much more honest assessment of the reality on the ground and the reality in the halls of government,” she said.

The latest poll reflects what appears to be an ever-diminishing appetite for a two-state solution on both sides. (Yes, right. And study done by a US think-tank?)

Two sets of polls earlier this year – one of Palestinians for the right-leaning US thinktank Washington Institute for Near East Policy and a Pew Research poll in the spring – both identified growing pessimism that a peace deal could be done.

Note: But the details are known if you are interested, though we are under the belief that all the details are secrets because that’s what Israel wants you to believe.

Historic Vote on Palestine in the British Parliament: More of a symbolic vote?

Britain Parliament voted Yes for a Palestinian State. 12 dinosaurs said No. The 274 mankind said YES.

Israel is losing the battle for public opinion in Britain. Few are in a better position to chart the draining of support than the Israeli ambassador to Britain.

Daniel Taub was born and educated here and has only to compare the benign views about Israel of his youth with the cold, unvarnished judgments of today.

Gone is the rose-tinted vision of Israel as an island of democracy in a sea of irrational and violent Arabs.

Gone is the belief that Israel wants to negotiate, if only it could find a partner to talk to.

Gone, too, is the notion that there is symmetry in this conflict, that this is a battle between equal forces.

This is not the effect of a larger Muslim community. All Britons today are more likely to be aware of the 14,000 settlements Israel approved during its nine month peace talks with the Palestinians; to wonder where a Palestinian state is going to go , with more than 600,000 settlers in occupied East Jerusalem and the West Bank; to acknowledge the insouciant racism of Israeli discourse about non-Jews; to recoil at the cost in Palestinian civilian lives of Israel’s definition of its own security.

The more Israel insists that its supporters choose between their liberalism and their zionism, the weaker its case becomes that the two can co-exist. Britons are losing faith that a solution is just around the corner. The idea of Israel is changing in the minds of its allies. It is no longer a cause. It is becoming heavy baggage.

Monday’s vote in parliament to recognize Palestine as a state, does not therefore come out of the blue. Neither did the largest ever demonstration seen in Britain on this conflict during the recent Gaza war. Nor did the resignation of the Foreign Office minister Lady Warsi, the highest placed British politician yet to resign over the UK’s “morally indefensible” stance over Gaza.

Warsi was no George Galloway, a figure on the political fringe. She remains a mainstream politician who was courted by the two other political parties after her resignation.

Therefore her plea in the Observer on Sunday to recognise the state of Palestine carries political as well as moral force:

There is a lack of political will and our moral compass is missing,” the former Foreign Office minister told the Observer. “There are no negotiations, there is no show in town. Somehow we have to breathe new life into these negotiations, and one of the ways we can do that is by recognizing the state of Palestine.

The vote will be a symbolic one.

A Palestinian state is a virtual concept, and it has already been recognized by 134 states, most recently by Sweden.

But there is nothing symbolic or theoretical about the pressure applied by the Israel lobby on MPs of all parties to toe the line, but particularly a Labour Party led Ed Miliband. The vote in favor would amount to an historic act of defiance with an ally used to dictating the terms of the debate.

Israel and America’s argument that recognition and the reluctant, faltering moves by Mahmoud Abbas to join UN institutions like the International Criminal Court, would prejudice the outcome of meaningful talks is holed below the water line.

There are no meaningful talks. What greater prejudice to the outcome of a negotiated solution could there be than the monthly announcements of settlements, which unlike moves in the UN, take immediate concrete shape, and for which Israel pays no cost? Who does more to de-legitimize the state of the Israel, than the state of Israel itself?

As the former foreign secretary William Hague himself said, how long can this go on without the two state solution dying. It is by all appearances already dead. It will not take much before the coroner issues its death certificate.

Warsi revealed the support she got for her position from the “highest levels” of the Foreign Office after her resignation. She accurately described the vice like grip on policy by a small group of politicians “who are not allowing public opinion, ministerial views, parliamentary views and the views of the people who work in this system”

This is not a debate about outcomes, a one or a two state solution.

It is about the ability of Israel to fashion and limit the international debate;

to ensure that debate takes place only within narrowly defined parameters;

to ensure that it continues to enjoy impunity for its actions;

to nullify the international pressure on it to come to the table.

Occupation, as Abbas has himself said, is cost free to the occupiers.The strategy by all members of the international community has now got to be to start making the occupation more expensive. This debate and the vote will be an important start.

And Israel Likud party Charter Calls for? Destruction of Any Palestinian State?

The Likud Charter Calls for Destruction of Any Palestinian State

Jonathan Weiler posted this Aug. 4, 2014

Since virtually every comment on Hamas in American media includes the assertion that the group’s Charter rejects Israel’s right to exist, it’s worth noting the following from the Likud Platform of 1999:

a. “The Jordan River will be the permanent eastern border of the State of Israel.” (Israel occupies the land east of the Jordan River and has settlements there. It occupies all of Palestine, the Syrian Golan Heights and land in Lebanon)

b. “Jerusalem is the eternal, united capital of the State of Israel and only of Israel.
The government will flatly reject Palestinian proposals to divide Jerusalem” (Against the successive UN declarations to the contrary)

c. “The Government of Israel flatly rejects the establishment of a Palestinian Arab state west of the Jordan river.” (And has been flaunting all negotiations to that effect)

d. “The Jewish communities in Judea, Samaria and Gaza are the realization of Zionist values. Settlement of the land is a clear expression of the unassailable right of the Jewish people to the Land of Israel and constitutes an important asset in the defense of the vital interests of the State of Israel. The Likud will continue to strengthen and develop these communities and will prevent their uprooting. (There are no Jewish communities in Gaza)

There have been some updates to the platform more recently, reflecting Israel’s withdrawal of settlements from Gaza in 2005.

But the Likud Party has *never* in its statements of principles, accepted a Palestinian State. Its electoral partner, Yisrael Beitenu, has likewise categorically rejected the possibility of an independent Palestinian State, insisting that the idea is nothing more than a ploy to facilitate the destruction of Israel.

The Hamas charter rejects Israel as a sovereign political entity. (Mind you that the UN partitioned Palestine in 1947 and gave the minority Jews more than 57% of the land)

But on the central question of one side denying the other’s legitimacy — it’s hard to ignore the symmetry between Likud – the party of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu – and Hamas. (With the understanding that Hamas is not in the Palestinian government, like the Likud)

Some defenders of Israel become indignant at the mention of these realities as scurrilous and spurious because the Likud platform quoted above is just an “old” statement of principles not reflective of the Party’s actions in power.

But by that logic, the Hamas Charter, written over 25 years ago, cannot be said to be the sole controlling document of that organization, since much more recent statements and actions by its leadership have, at least some times, included an expressed willingness to pursue a long-term agreement with Israel.

Furthermore, Hamas also agreed to join the Palestinian Authority in a unity government that accepts all previous PA agreements with Israel.

Too much political discussion in the United States about Israel/Palestine proceeds from the premise that Palestinians have no other interest than to destroy Israel and drive the Jews into the sea.

Therefore, Israel claims that it has no viable negotiating partner for peace. The political reality on the ground does not conform to such a simple-minded tale of good vs. evil.

Israeli hardliners in power have repeatedly rejected any basis for a viable Palestinian state.

Indeed, Prime Minister Netanyahu’s qualified statement in support of a two-state solution in 2009 – which his American apologists repeatedly invoke to demonstrate his “moderate” bona fides – was characterized by a member of his own cabinet as “the spin of our lives.”

In fact. Likud leaders have said unequivocally that no two-state deal is possible. And just three weeks ago, speaking at a press conference, Netanyahu said:

“I think the Israeli people understand now what I always say: that there cannot be a situation, under any agreement, in which we relinquish security control of the territory west of the River Jordan.”

As David Horovitz wrote in The Times of Israel:

“He wasn’t saying that he doesn’t support a two-state solution. He was saying that it’s impossible. This was not a new, dramatic change of stance by the prime minister. It was a new, dramatic exposition of his long-held stance.”

In other words, no independent Palestinian state. Period. Ever.

Arab leaders are accused *all the time* of making one set of (conciliatory) statements in front of some audiences in English, while revealing their (true) rejectionist feelings in front of others, in Arabic.

To the extent that this is true, one could certainly say the same about Netanyahu – relatively conciliatory and reasonable-sounding statements for international audiences.

And altogether different rhetoric for internal consumption. Bibi is, after all, a master – like many politicians – at speaking out of both sides of his mouth.

Since Palestine does not exist as a recognized independent state, there is no need for Israel’s rejectionists to call for Palestine’s “destruction.” (Though programs of annihilating the Palestinians and their identity has been practiced since 1948)

But the consistent avowals of Israeli leaders – and the plain language of the party platforms that express their parties’ core beliefs – to prevent such a state from coming into being is not substantively different from the expressed desire of the Hamas Charter to reject Israel’s existence.

The beginnings of a more fair and balanced appreciation of the conflict would start with that acknowledgment.

Jonathan Weiler

“Do you think you are making progress by eradicating the Moslem Brotherhood”? Interview with Abdel Fattah al-Sisi

CAIRO May 15, 2014 

Egyptian presidential frontrunner Abdel Fattah al-Sisi gave Reuters a wide-ranging interview. The following is the full text.

Text of Sisi interview with Reuters

Egypt's presidential candidate and former army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, looks on during an interview with Reuters in Cairo May 14, 2014. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

Egypt’s presidential candidate and former army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, looks on during an interview with Reuters in Cairo May 14, 2014.

CREDIT: REUTERS/AMR ABDALLAH DALSH

Q: How long do you think it will take to make real difference. What is your expectation as to the timetable before people start seeing real change?

A: The idea of 100 days. The Egyptians expected a lot of things. During two revolutions they were aspiring for bread, freedom, social justice. The Egyptians wanted to love this. I need to give them security and stability and complete development.

The truth is one hundred days is not enough. The challenges present in Egypt are so many. Programmes available in Western countries, the situations are much more stable in all fields compared to the reality in Egypt.

I believe that within two years of serious, continuous work we can achieve the type of improvement Egyptians are looking for.

Q: Is there a leader in past Egypt or anywhere around the world who you are trying to model yourself after? Do you see a Nasser, do you see a Sadat do you see somebody you have in your mind that would be a good model for what you want to be?

A: Every era and every stage has a leader to lead and succeed. The current time we are in the situation is very different than other eras. We need to work with seriousness to serve Egyptians.

Q: I guess the first challenge next week around the 26th is to see if a lot of people are going to vote. How important is voter turnout to your sense of being successful in the election?

A: We succeeded in the first step of the road map and the constitution and this was a very great constitution. It achieved a lot of what Egyptians had hoped for in their lives and their futures.

The number of Egyptians who voted was very considerable, in the millions. But we need in the coming elections a greater number than those who voted in the constitution.  So they can choose with their full will who will lead them in the coming stage.

Q: Is there a particular level of turnout you would consider successful?

A: I hope that all Egyptians vote. We have more than 50 million voters. I hope they all vote. This is an opportunity to express their will.

Q: So you are looking for 100 percent?

A: I hope so.

Q: The U.S. has been a strategic partner of Egypt for a long time.  What is your current assessment of the state of the relations with the United States? What areas would you like to improve?

A: Our relationship with the United States of America is a strategic, stable and steady relationship. It does not mean that during certain times, a state of confusion, that we cannot continue that. Of course not.

These ties are stable and the world now is interrelated. There is no room for one state to form relationships at the expense of the other. In Egypt we need to cooperate with all states as the amount of challenges in Egypt are very huge that need support and the participation of all.

Q: There has been a partial freeze on military aid do you anticipate that lifting once you become president?

A: Let’s be clear, I understand the European, Western and America standards concerning the freezing and suspension of equipment. Although this had a very negative reaction from the Egyptian people. The more time that passes the more the vision gets clearer to everyone.

People and the world realize what happened in Egypt was the will of all of the Egyptian people. The army could not have abandoned its people or there would have been a civil war and we don’t know where that would have taken us. We understand the American position. We hope that they understand ours.

Q: Is there anything in particular you would like to say to President Obama about the direction of Egypt that might be helpful in shifting the views there?

A: We are fighting a war against terrorism. The Egyptian army is undertaking major operations in the Sinai so that it is not transformed into a base for terrorism that will threaten its neighbours and make Egypt unstable. If Egypt is unstable then the region is unstable. I don’t think this is in the interest of security and peace in the entire world.

We need American support to fight terrorism, we need American equipment to combat terrorism. Not just in Sinai.

Today we are present and working to secure our borders which are long and stretch from the start of the Mediterranean Sea until 1,200 kilometres on the Libyan border, and similarly with Sudan. Aside from sea borders that stretch more than 3,000 kilometres. That needs real security. You see how unstable the region is.

Q: On Libya, there is a tremendous amount of instability in Libya. Do you see Libya as a threat?

A: The situation is not just Libya. We have to be wary of the spread of the terrorist map in the region. I imagine there is a role from the West on that. They have not continued their mission in Libya. There should have been a collection of weapons that are present everywhere until the country stabilises and has a government. Because there wasn’t sufficient soldiers or police so that this country would stabilize and enter a process of real democracy.

We have another situation that will take a long time if it is left like that. The international community, headed by the West, has to take part in this operation. I see that it has to resume its mission to achieve stability in Libya. Collect the weapons and enhance security before they abandon it.

Q: You have talked about a peaceful solution in Syria. Do you think Syria would be better off with President Assad remaining in office?

A: The peaceful solution is the appropriate solution. The unity of Syria is in the interest of the security of the region. Syria should not turn into an attractive spot for extremist terrorist elements. That will threaten the entire region. When I sit with my European friends, I tell them there are European citizens fighting in Syria. Their numbers are more than 1,000 to 2,000. 

I imagine after the situation ends in Syria, regardless of how it will end, they will return to Europe. What will they do? What will the situation in Syria turn into? Will they attack us, will they attack Saudi Arabia, Jordan or Israel? We have to be aware of this radical ideology and activity and its effect on security and stability in the Middle East region.

Q: Do you think of a solution that will resolve the problem that would not involve Assad?

A: This matter requires a dialogue and extensive talks because it is more dangerous than just expressing an opinion on it. We have to see the full picture and have in front of us the issue of the unity of Syrian lands.

A peaceful solution so that region does not get more complicated. The issue of dealing with extremist elements what will we do? Otherwise we will see another Afghanistan. I don’t think you want to create another Afghanistan in the region.

Q: How are relations between Egypt and Israel now? How do you see that progressing under your presidency?

A: Let me tell you that our relationship with Israel and the peace treaty has been stable for more than 30 years and had faced a lot of challenges yet it remained stable. We respected it and we will respect it. The Israeli people know this.

We see there a real opportunity for peace that will prepare the region for an era of peace and cooperation between states. This is what I see.

The question of whether we would be committed to the peace treaty is over. The issue is stable among all leaders and the public opinion in Egypt. What we need is to build on it.

We need to see a Palestinian state. We need to move on peace, which has been frozen for many years. There will be a real chance for peace in the region. We are ready to play any role that will achieve peace and security in the region.

Q: Do you have a plan in mind to build the Egyptian economy?

A: We have to admit that the economic situation in Egypt is difficult, and not just over the last three years. Egyptians were aspiring to a more stable life than the reality we are living in.  More than 50% of the Egyptian people suffer from poverty. There is a lot of unemployment. Our entrance according to our programme would be to create job opportunities for Egyptians and fixing the minimum and maximum wage.

The minimum wage in Egypt is considered very small to achieve an appropriate social standard. The subsidies provided by the Egyptian state need to be distributed fairly. The rich get more from the subsidies than the poor. The programme aims to spread the population beyond the 6% of the land it lives on now. We need to provide more work opportunities. And to give opportunities for Egyptian, Arab and foreign investment.

I am addressing this to the West and all friends. Egypt needs your help in this phase so that it gets out of the circle of poverty it is suffering from.

Q: Do you see a continued role for the army in making sure that money from the Gulf is used in the economy?

A: We need all state institutions to take part in the development of the community. All state institutions are involved in this as the challenge is huge and we have to overcome it.

Q: So for the time being is the army the best institution to do that?

A: The army is very busy combating terrorism in the Sinai and on the western border and the southern border. But if there is an opportunity for it to help with engineering work and roads there will be a benefit from its capabilities. There is talk that the army owns 40% of the economy. This is not true. It does not exceed 2% of the economy.

Q: Do you see a way of reducing subsidies?

A: We are in a fearful situation now in regard to these subsidies and the way they are distributed. But we won’t be able to pressure the poor people more than that. But we can revise the subsidies to make more of them go to the poor and not the rich.

Let me give you an example. On the subsidies that the rich get. If a man owns a car above 2000cc the amount of fuel subsidies he gets in Egypt, which is in a difficult economic situation, 3,000 or 4,000 pounds a month. The same goes for electricity. The only citizen that does not benefit is the poor who has no car. We need to move and revise these subsidies to go to the poor.

Q: What type of change are we talking about?

A: Look at the embassies. They go buy fuel that is subsidized. The government pays three quarters of its cost. All citizens, anyone who goes to a gas station, gets these subsidies. There are many people and sectors who don’t need this and we will try to correct it.

Q: Do you have any plans to reduce the influence of businessmen who dominated under President Mubarak?

A: We are a country that always works in the framework of law and the constitution. We want to work within this framework now and in the future. We never want measures that would scare anyone. We also need to have measures that would provide equal opportunities for everyone.

Q: What would draw international investment into Egypt in the next few years?

A: Normally Egypt is a big country with a special status. There is a large labour force. A young country. The number of Egyptian youths is huge and they are capable of work. It is a big market. Investment can be very successful. It is a gateway to Africa. There is a real promising opportunity for investment in Egypt. We will respect our commitments, provide a convenient environment and laws to secure investment.

Q: Do you think the Egyptian pound should float free? Is it an impediment to the economy?

A: The more the economic situation improves the more the currency will improve and vice versa. We need measures to stimulate the economy and pump a lot of money through its veins so that real improvement happens that would be felt by the citizen and Egypt enters a better phase.

Q: For how many more years do you expect aid from Gulf countries?

A: Let’s be honest with each other. We don’t see this as a good thing frankly and hope it ends as soon as possible. It is not just me. All Egyptians think this way.

Q: Would you say ideally two years or five years or ten years?

A: This will depend on results.

Q: You have spoken about eradicating the Brotherhood. Do you think you are making progress?

A: We feel very sorry about how these people express or introduced or presented our Islam. Very ugly face. Look at the global map of extremism and terrorism in the world. You will find that this issue has become rejected and unacceptable for most countries of the world.

This form, the idea of killing, destruction that is present in many countries, I believe you understand that humanity and civilization does not accept this. And logic does not accept this.

Q: Is the best approach a military one or does there need to be education. What approach works best?

A: This issue requires a multi-dimensional plan. The security angle is not the decisive aspect. Education. Economy. Culture. Awareness. We need to move on all of that in Egypt. That confrontation requires everyone to participate. You had a role in supporting democracy.

You want to create democracy in many countries. This is a good thing. But it won’t succeed in the way it is needed, except through good economic support and proper support for education. I was present in the United States and before it in Britain … And I wrote an article on the future of democracy in the Middle East …

Are you ready to open your countries for us for more education that won’t be expensive. To send the intelligent ones among our children to be educated in your countries, to see and learn. This is a form of developing and supporting democracy. Democracy is not only to educate the youth but to create an appropriate atmosphere to make this democracy works, are you ready for this?

Are you ready to provide opportunities in a country like Egypt for people to work so that poverty can ease? And that would be a programme to support democracy in Egypt.

Are you ready to see and participate in the problem of the slums in Egypt so that there would be a real environment for real democracy? Or like what I told to Cathy Ashton that you are paying very small amounts and wash your hands from the issue of democracy. The environment in this country has to be fit for democracy to develop and live.

Q: Can we just pick up on one piece of that? Are you saying that Western countries have become too restrictive in permitting Egyptians and other people from the Middle East to go to universities in the west? In other words post 9-11 restrictions?

A: Yes of course. This is part of the issue as the amount of delegations that get offered … Let’s talk about 27 European countries if every country gave Egypt 30 students each year. We are talking about 2,100 students to be present in European universities.

And if 10 or 20% of America universities gave a similar number we will find that the numbers become huge. We will send the intelligent ones of our children, our best youths to go and see and learn and return to us with science and culture. If you want to help us, there are many things to talk about any real aid to develop democracy in the Middle East and Egypt. But there will be a cost.

We want the student who can’t pay to get an excellent education and they become the society’s elite afterwards to lead it. Take care, you have to have a real contribution in the democratic progress of Egypt.

Q: So if education goes hand-in-hand with security, is it a sensible approach to ban the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, or does not that risk driving these people underground, perhaps making them more radical and more of a problem?

A: The problem is that they lost their connection with the Egyptians, lost sympathy from the majority of Egyptians, and that is an issue we too have to be aware of. Unjustified violence towards Egyptians made them not only lose any sympathy among Egyptians but also meant they have no real chance of reconciliation with society. And this is the reality we are talking about.

The problem is not mine frankly. I assure you. The problem is with the Egyptian people and we have a great opportunity and I ask you to go talk to the simple ordinary Egyptian citizen and ask him. You will find that he is very angry and rejects any form of reconciliation. And frankly during this stage and the coming one, no president can act against the will of the people.

Q: You are known to be a very religious person and you have talked a little about this, can you talk a little bit more about how you see religion interacting with government in Egypt and the role it plays in civic life but also the role in government? What is the appropriate role of religion in government in Egypt?

A: Ask my colleagues in the War College and ask my colleagues in Staff College in Britain, how I interacted with them. I did not deal with them on the basis of religion or race or sect. On the contrary and not only me and my family and I don’t see there is a problem that we all live together like that and that is not a humanitarian address although that is acceptable and needed but this is a religious talk.

Religion cannot clash with humanity as we see now. The entire world has become a very small village and we would not be able to live together with this sort of radicalism and extremism and the inability to comprehend and disagree.

Q: Can I just ask you about the trial of the Muslim Brotherhood members. There has been a large number of executions ordered in courts. Do you feel that the judicial process was a fair one, do you support these decisions?

A: I know the Western culture and I know the humanitarian logic you have and I understand it.

First of all I am an Egyptian citizen now and I am not an Egyptian official and I hope that you accept this as I say it and trust me.

Secondly, I am not going to talk about this case in particular but I want to say that we are founding a state based on the rule of law.

We respect the judiciary and its independence and we do not interfere in it. This is very important … and that is something I appreciate and understand, but also I hoped that we were concerned about the number of victims from the other side.

Q: It is kind of unpleasant topic but you did mention two assassination attempts against you. I haven’t heard any of the circumstances behind them or the background. Can you elaborate a little bit on any of them?

A: It is a radical way of thinking and it doesn’t accept mutual understanding or cooperation with the other. It is not ready for mutual understanding, it considers itself as the only true way and anyone else is not. That’s the problem. Without going into details into the assassination attempts, the assassination attempts will not end.

Because, please look at the world around you, the West has to pay attention to what’s going on in the world and the map of extremism and its expansion. This map will reach you inevitably.

Q: How do you go about dealing with that extremism in the Sinai and the borders around Egypt? What practical steps will you take should you become president?

A: I want to say it will only be more measures. We were keen that Sinai does not turn into a base to launch for attacks which threaten Egypt’s neighbours. This is against Egypt’s sovereignty on its soil and against the peace treaties that we’ve signed. We understood the reaction from their side when some limited operations took place against Israeli soil.

But we on the other side inside Sinai undertook and undertake very wide-ranging operations to fix the security situation and to deal with the terrorist elements present there. Either by detaining them or by dealing with them. But there are two points we are keen on, it’s very important you know them:

The first point, we never want to resort to unjustified acts of violence. And we don’t want violations of human rights. We don’t want killing of innocents so that won’t become an excuse for the expansion of these operations. That’s what makes it go on and also, as we’re speaking of this. There is equipment that we need the United States to give to us. And I believe that this matter must be reviewed now and be accomplished as soon as possible.

I am talking about Sinai now. I am not talking about a border longer than 1,000 kilometres. The other side in Libya don’t have to the opportunity to secure the border appropriately. And we have commitments to Egyptian national security, to the security and stability of this poor citizen so that his life and the life of his children will not be targeted, that won’t work.

This is a point that we need not just America to understand, but the West and the entire world. This is why we extend our hand to every country of the world to help us, we must combat terrorism practically and succeed in this confrontation.

Q: You talk a lot about the frustration of the Egyptian people and impatience. How much time do you think the Egyptian people will give you to show that you’re making a real difference?

A: Egyptians are a very patient people and a great people. And remember it’s a 7,000-year-old civilization. On the condition that there is hope that is realized and achieved on the ground, they will be ready to be patient. I call on the West to look in an appreciative way towards the development and growing and the support of the Egyptian economy to complete the road map for the future of democracy in Egypt. I hope this message reaches you.

(Created by Michael Georgy)

Note: Jonathan Wright, former head of Reuters’ Cairo bureau, had the following great observation on:

“You have spoken about eradicating the Brotherhood. Do you think you are making progress?”

It is the exact same question that was asked to Hitler by a British newspaper to Hitler (1938) –

“You have spoken about eradicating the Jews. Do you think you are making progress?”

Israeli soldiers “gas” themselves in village of Bilin

Last week, Israeli soldiers and police dispersed by force and tear gas hundreds of Palestinians who were trying to rebuild a village that Israel completely erased in the Jordan Valley in 1967. The village of Bilin is another story of confronting the occupier.

Mind you that the Jordan Valley is withing the West Bank territory, but Israel built hundreds of “war settlements” in that region to exploit its water resources and prevent the Palestinians free access to the State of Jordan.

Every week, Israel encourage its radical right-wing Jews to invade and “desecrate” the Islamic Temple in Jerusalem, or the Aqsa Dome Mosque.

Israel is progressing in its plan for erecting more settlement in East Jerusalem, proposed to be the Capital of the Palestinian State in the current negotiation with Kerry.

Cynical Idealism posted these funny pictures on Feb. 7, 2014

Israeli soldiers in Bil’in gas themselves, Palestinian kids chase them away, get gassed
https://m.facebook.com/Bilin.village


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

July 2020
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