Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘questions

So many Questions for the curious type

Note: I re-edited this article of 2011 “Questions, questions…Quit it! What do I know?” Actually, I am re-editing older articles that viewers are reminding me of them. Adding, correcting and updating.

At what moment eyes see?

“My new-born girl, my new-born grandchild taught me how seeing come to be.  The first few days, the new-born had vague vision.  The looking eyes focused on me, gradually acquiring primitive thinking.  Suddenly, I recognize an elaborate thinking in the eyes:  The new-born is seeing me! The vision has a meaning now” (Medical professor Yves Pouliquen).

(You can’t shed this feeling Not to be true, whatever sciences confirm)

What is the power of beauty?

“Beauty has immense power of illumination:  It is a counter-poison to reality.  Beauty permits you to appreciate reality and to love living.  Beauty resides in the domain of the dreams, an invention of the mind, a mental construct to survive.  The two dreams of beauty and love are real since we are capable of dedicating our life to them.  Beauty necessarily contains a large portion of what we consider as truth”.  (Academician Jean-Marie Rouart)

(Falling in love is transferred to failing to sleep, but Love is a notion that is consequent to consistent caring and compassion)

Are we born a man?

“We are born female.  We are inducted into manhood by rituals and customs.  It is a harsh process of indoctrination” (Eric Zemmour)

(I tend to rally to that conjecture since we are taken care of by mostly women in our upbringing. Obviously high testosterone level  might change the done in adulthood by succumbing peer-pressure and emulating the male antics)

Is writing a smile or a lament?

“Writing is our way of nodding agreement to what has taken place.  Writing is an approving prayer, a positive confirmation” (Author and politician Marc Lambron)

( I say: Voyons! Un bon livre vaut une vie: ce serait une vie pour les future generations)

Is life a real product, a scenario, or a stage production?

“Life is remodeled and sculpted every day.  Life is revisited constantly:  the dialogue, the sequence…in the stage production and are altered at each new location.  You change the location of the scene and the entire script acquires a different meaning, an alternative perspective on life” (Movie director Elie Chouraqui)

Does the past reserves surprises?

“It is mostly past recollections that extend surprises for the transformation of our stories.  Feelings are constantly metamorphosed:  What seemed like glorious best moments can become the worst events in our memory.” (Author Jean-Paul Einthoven)

Still pictures or videos?

Once we click on the camera the picture is already from the past.

If we could learn how to analyse still pictures and the emotions that transpire, our diaries and auto-biographies are enhanced in frankness and openness. Why pictures in auto-biographies are of the happy moments among family and friends?

Are we trying to hide our real feelings from the intelligent readers?

Note 2:  Those quotes are extracted from the book “Two or three things I know about them…” by Sabine de Boustros and Loris Moutran

 

Huge emotional differences: Glossing or framing questions, demands, options

You live in small town and there are about 600 suffering from an epidemic. The team of epidemic-control strategists is surveying the town for the best option they prefer for the actions. Four options are presented:

1. Choice A: Save 200 cases

2. Choice B: 33% chance all 600 will survive and 66% chance that no one will survive

3. Choice C: 400 dies

4. Choice D: 33% no one will die and 66% all will die.

What is your choice?

Probably you picked choice D.

Suppose you were given only option A and B. You probably selected choice A. No brainer: 200 in the hand is better than 600 on the tree.

Suppose you were presented with choices C and D? You probably selected choice D. Why?

Rationally, all 4 choices are identical in outcome, if probabilities are pretty correct, but your did selected certain choices. Why?

1. The difference in the framing of options was by changing the term life with death.

Negative connotations strike more powerful chords in our emotional worldview. We feel we had experienced far more sad, frustrating, painful moments and event in our survival process than we experienced happy and satisfying moments (and quickly forgotten to boot it)

Bad happenings are immeasurably higher in frequency and worse in consequences. This realization cannot improve our state of mind that tomorrow is going to be a “good day”

We are the descendants  of the cautious people, the luckier kinds, those who survived most of the bad happenings before they gave birth to a fresh bunch of descendants.

2. The intuitive, automatic and direct decision has a soft spot for the plausible stories.

3. We have this loss aversion bias in our genes.

Another example:

You are selecting for less fattening food. One jar says: 99% Fat Free and the other one is labeled only 1% fat. Which jar do you tend to select?

And yet, the two jars are identical in fat content.

Even if jar A says 91% fat free compared to Jar B of 2% fat, most probably you’ll pick jar A.

The term Glossing is the popular word for the technical term of Framing a questions, demands, options…

Your mother tells you:

1. The trash can is filled.

2. Could you please empty the can?

Which demand is more readily acceptable and sounds more musical to your ears?

Questions, questions…Quit it! What do I know?!

At what moment eyes see?

“My new-born girl, my new-born grandchild taught me how seeing come to be.  The first few days, the new-born had vague vision.  The looking eyes focused on me, gradually acquire primitive thinking.  Suddenly, I recognize an elaborate thinking in the eyes:  The new-born is seeing me! The vision has a meaning now” (Medical professor Yves Pouliquen)

What is the power of beauty?

“Beauty has immense power of illumination:  It is a counter-poison to reality.  Beauty permits you to appreciate reality and to love living.  Beauty resides in the domain of the dreams, an invention of the mind, a mental construct to survive.  The two dreams of beauty and love are real since we are capable of dedicating our life to them.  Beauty necessarily contains a large portion of what we consider as truth”.  (Academician Jean-Marie Rouart)

Are we born a man?

“We are born female.  We are inducted into manhood by rituals and customs.  It is a harsh process of indoctrination” (Eric Zemmour)

Is writing a smile or a lament?

“Writing is our way of nodding agreement to what has taken place.  Writing is an approving prayer, a positive confirmation” (Author and politician Marc Lambron)

Is life a real product, a scenario, or a stage production?

“Life is remodeled and sculpted every day.  Life is revisited constantly:  the dialogue, the sequence…in the stage production are altered at each new location.  You change the location of the scene and the entire script acquires a different meaning, an alternative perspective on life” (Movie director Elie Chouraqui)

Does the past reserves surprises?

“It is mostly past recollections that extend surprises for the transformation of our stories.  Feelings are constantly metamorphosed:  What seemed like glorious best moments can become the worst events in our memory.” (Author Jean-Paul Einthoven)

Once we click on the camera the picture is already from the past.  If we could learn how to analyse still pictures and the emotions that transpire, our diaries and auto-biographies are enhanced in frankness and openness.

Why pictures in auto-biographies are of the happy moments among family and friends?

Are we trying to hide our real feelings from the intelligent readers?

Note:  Those quotes are extracted from the book “Two or three things I know about them…” by Sabine de Boustros and Loris Moutran

Idiosyncrasy in “conjectures”; (Dec. 21, 2009)

Idiosyncrasy or cultural bias relates to “common sense” behavior (for example, preferential priorities in choices of values, belief systems, and daily habits…) is not restricted among different societies: it can be found within one society, even within what can be defined as “homogeneous restricted communities” ethnically, religiously, common language, gender groups, or professional disciplines.

Most disciplines have mushroomed into cults.

A cult is any organization that creates its own nomenclature and definition of terms to be distinguished from the other cults in order to acquiring recognition as a “professional entity” or independent disciplines that should benefit from laws of special minorities (when mainly it is a matter of generating profit or doing business as usual).

These cults want to owe the non-initiated into believing that they have serious well-developed methods or excellent comprehension of a restricted area in sciences. The initiated on multidisciplinary knowledge recognize that the methods of any cult are old and even far less precise or developed; that the terms are not new and there are already analogous terms in other disciplines that are more accurate and far better defined.

Countless experiments have demonstrated various kinds of idiosyncrasies.  This article is oriented toward “cult” kinds of orders, organization, and professional discipline.  My first post is targeting the order of mathematicians; the next article will focus on experiments.

Mathematics, meaning “sure study” (wisekunde), has no reliable historical documentation. Most of mathematical concepts were written many decades or centuries after they were “floating around” among mathematicians.

Mathematics is confusing with its array of nomenclature. What are the differences among axiom, proposition, lemma, postulate, or conjecture?  What are the differences among the terms, theorem, questions, problems, hypothesis, corollary, and again conjecture?  For example, personally, I feel that axiom is mostly recurrent in geometry, lemma in probability, hypothesis in analytical procedures, and conjecture in algebraic deductive reasoning.

Hypothesis is in desuetude in mathematics. For example, Newton said “I am not making a hypothesis”.

Socrates made fun of this term by explaining how it was understood “I designate hypothesis what people doing geometry use to treating a question.  For example, when asked for their “expert opinion” they reply: “I still cannot confirm but I think that if I have a viable hypothesis for this problem and if it is the following hypothesis… then I think that we may draw a conclusion. If we have another hypothesis then another conclusion is more valid.”

Plato said: “As long as mathematics start from hypothesis instead of facts then we do not think that they have true comprehension, since they are not going back to fundamentals”

Hypothesis is still the main term used in experimental research. Theoretically, an experiment is not meant to accept a hypothesis as true or valid, but simply “Not to reject it” if the relationships among the manipulated variables are “statistically significant” to a pre-determined level, usually 5% in random errors.

Many pragmatic scientific researchers don’t care about the fine details in theoretical mathematical concepts and tend to adopt a hypothesis that was not rejected as law.  This is one case of idiosyncrasy when the researcher wants badly the “non-rejected” hypothesis to represent his view. Generally, an honest experimenter has to repeat the experiment or encourage someone else to generalize the results by studying more variables.

Conjecture means (throwing in together) and can be translated as conclusion or deduction; basically, it is an opinion or supposition based on insufficient proofs.

In the last century, conjectures were exposed in writing as promptly as possible instead of keeping them floating ideas, concepts, or probable theorems. This new behavior of writing conjectures was given the rationale that “plausible reasoning” is a set of suppositions thrown around as questions mathematicians guess they have answers to them, but are unable to demonstrate temporarily.

The term conjecture has been used so freely in the last decades that Andre Weil warned that “current mathematicians use the term conjecture when they fail after a few attempts to verify a concept, even if the problem is of no importance.”  David Kazhdan ironically warned that this practice of enunciating conjectures might turn out like a 5-year Soviet plan.

At first, a set of conjectures was meant to be the basic structure for a theorem or precise assertions that were temporarily used in the trading of logical discussions. Thus, conjectures permit the construction of rigorous deductions that are accessible to direct testing of their validity. A conjecture was a “research program” that move ahead in order to foresee the explored domain.

Consequently, conjecture is kind of extending a name and an address to a set of suppositions and analogies for a concept, long before tools and methods are created to approach directly the problem.

A “Problem” designates a mental task submitted to the audience or targeted for research or project; usually, the set of problems lead to demonstrating a general theorem. Many problems are in fact conjectures such as the problem of twin primary numbers that consists of proving the existence of an infinity of coupled numbers such that p-q = 2.

One of the explanations for using freely the term conjecture is the modern facility of mathematicians of discriminating aspects of uncertainty at the theoretical level. It is an acquired habit, an idiosyncrasy. Thus, for a mathematician to state a conjecture he must have solved many particular cases and recognize that a research program is needed to developing special tools for demonstrating the conjecture.  This is a tough restriction in this age where time is of essence among millions of mathematicians competing for prizes.

The kid that kept asking questions (March 24, 2009)

 

            The French Colonel Jean-Paul Setau was contributing money to the sick in under-developed States.  He specifically adopted (medically) a girl suffering of leprosy from India.  He visited this girl at the special hospital in France and the nun asked him to deliver spiritual (religious) education for the children.  Jean-Paul prayed and got the answer “go and find out the questions that kids might want answers for”.  Jean-Paul received a list of written questions from kids; a sample follows:

1)      Where do we go after death?

2)      Why are we afraid of strangers?

3)      Do extraterrestrials exist?

4)      Why accidents occur to even people who believe in God?

5)      What God means?

6)      Why we are born if we have to die?

7)      How many stars in the sky?

8)      Does the Lord listen to those who believe in other Gods?

9)      Why there are poor and sick people?

10)  Why God created mosquitoes and flies?

11)  Why the guardian angle is not close by when we feel sad?

12)  Why we love a few people and hate other?

13)  Who named colors?

14)  If God is in heaven with my dead mother, how come God can still be alive?

 

I have a couple of questions. First, if we are honest and sincere, then which one of the questions can you provide an answer to?  Second, if you indeed can answer a question, then how are you going to translate your comprehension to kids?  As for the first question I have no response; but I do have one for my second concern.  I suggest that you speak in stories and parables as Jesus did, but with a twist, that your stories are extracted from our current time and civilization such as video games, school life, urban situation, a few trip in nature, computer, internet navigation, biking, movies, pop songs, and what else do kids do to fill up the void and vacuum nowadays.  If you can come up with such kids’ stories that answer a few of the above questions then you can get rich, filthy rich.

 

            Okakura Kakuzo commented in his book “The Tea Ritual in Japan”:  When I judge someone I am conscious that the tribunal was set up for me: I am judging myself.  We do not see meanness in others: we can only notice our meanness. We can never forgive those who prejudiced us: We believe that we will never be forgiven.  We tell the harsh truth to our brother: We want to hide it in ourselves.  We show our force and power: We do not want others to witness our frailty.

            The ceremony of tea drinking is the adoration of what is beautiful and simple. The effort is focused on the imperfect gestures of everyday with the aim of attempting the perfect task.  The beauty is in the complete respect of what is being done. A day offers dozens of opportunities for perfecting awkward tasks.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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