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Posts Tagged ‘Quran

 

 

 

Jesus: the Muslim prophet?

Christians like to claim ownership of Christ. But the veneration of Jesus by Muslims began during the lifetime of the Prophet of Islam (and before, since there existed Christian sects in Mecca)

Perhaps most telling is the story in the classical biographies of Muhammad, who, entering the city of Mecca in triumph in 630AD, proceeded at once to the Kaaba to cleanse the holy shrine of its idols. As he walked around, ordering the destruction of the pictures and statues of the 360 or so pagan deities, he came across a fresco on the wall depicting the Virgin and Child.

He is said to have covered it reverently with his cloak and decreed that all other paintings be washed away except that one.

Mehdi Hasan Published December 10, 2009

Christianity is rooted in the belief that Jesus is the Son of God, so is Islam’s version of Christ a source of tension, or a way of building bridges between the world’s two largest faiths?

Jesus, or Isa (3issa), as he is known in Arabic, is deemed by Islam to be a Muslim prophet rather than the Son of God, or God incarnate. He is referred to by name in as many as 25 different verses of the Quran and six times with the title of “Messiah” (or “Christ”, depending on which Quranic translation is being used).

Jesus is also referred to as the “Messenger” and the “Prophet” but, perhaps above all else, as the “Word” and the “Spirit” of God.

No other prophet in the Quran, not even Muhammad, is given this particular honour. In fact, among the 124,000 prophets said to be recognised by Islam – a figure that includes all of the Jewish prophets of the Old Testament – Jesus is considered second only to Muhammad, and is believed to be the precursor to the Prophet of Islam. (A messenger for each language and each people)

In his fascinating book The Muslim Jesus, the former Cambridge professor of Arabic and Islamic studies Tarif Khalidi brings together, from a vast range of sources, 303 stories, sayings and traditions of Jesus that can be found in Muslim literature, from the earliest centuries of Islamic history.

These paint a picture of Christ not dissimilar to the Christ of the Gospels. The Muslim Jesus is the patron saint of asceticism, the lord of nature, a miracle worker, a healer, a moral, spiritual and social role model. (Many Christian sects were banned by Byzantium as Heretics based on how Jesus’s nature is believed)

“Jesus used to eat the leaves of the trees,” reads one saying, “dress in hairshirts, and sleep wherever night found him. He had no child who might die, no house which might fall into ruin; nor did he save his lunch for his dinner or his dinner for his lunch. He used to say, ‘Each day brings with it its own sustenance.‘”

According to Islamic theology, Christ did not bring a new revealed law, or reform an earlier law, but introduced a new path or way (tariqah) based on the love of God; it is perhaps for this reason that he has been adopted by the mystics, or Sufis, of Islam.

The Sufi philosopher al-Ghazali described Jesus as “the prophet of the soul” and the Sufi master Ibn Arabi called him “the seal of saints”. The Jesus of Islamic Sufism, as Khalidi notes, is a figure “not easily distinguished” from the Jesus of the Gospels.

What prompted Khalidi to write such a pro­vocative book? “We need to be reminded of a history that told a very different story: how one religion, Islam, co-opted Jesus into its own spirituality yet still maintained him as an independent hero of the struggle between the spirit and the letter of the law,” he told me. “It is in many ways a remarkable story of religious encounter, of one religion fortifying its own piety by adopting and cherishing the master spiritual narrative of another religion.”

Islam reveres both Jesus and his mother, Mary (Joseph appears nowhere in the Islamic narrative of Christ’s birth). “Unlike the canonical Gospels, the Quran tilts backward to his miraculous birth rather than forward to his Passion,” writes Khalidi. “This is why he is often referred to as ‘the son of Mary’ and why he and his mother frequently appear together.” (The Jews in Jerusalem called Jesus the son of Mary too)

In fact, the Virgin Mary, or Maryam, as she is known in the Quran, is considered by Muslims to hold the most exalted spiritual position among women. She is the only woman mentioned by name in Islam’s holy book and a chapter of the Quran is named after her. In one oft-cited tradition, the Prophet Muhammad described her as one of the four perfect women in human history.

But the real significance of Mary is that Islam considers her a virgin and endorses the Christian concept of the Virgin Birth. “She was the chosen woman, chosen to give birth to Jesus, without a husband,” says Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, an imam in Leicester and assistant secretary general of the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB). This is the orthodox Islamic position and, paradoxically, as Seyyed Hossein Nasr notes in The Heart of Islam, “respect for such teachings is so strong among Muslims that today, in interreligious dialogues with Christians . . . Muslims are often left defending traditional . . . Christian doctrines such as the miraculous birth of Christ before modernist interpreters would reduce them to metaphors.

With Christianity and Islam so intricately linked, it might make sense for Muslim communities across Europe, harassed, haran­gued and often under siege, to do more to stress this common religious heritage, and especially the shared love for Jesus and Mary.

There is a renowned historical precedent for this from the life of the Prophet.

In 616AD, six years into his mission in Mecca, Muhammad decided to find a safer refuge for those of his followers who had been exposed to the worst persecution from his opponents in the pagan tribes of the Quraysh. He asked the Negus, the Christian king of Abyssinia (modern-day Ethiopia), to take them in. He agreed and more than 80 Muslims left Mecca with their families.

The friendly reception that greeted them upon arrival in Abyssinia so alarmed the Quraysh that, worried about the prospects of Muhammad’s Muslims winning more allies abroad, they sent two delegates to the court of the Negus to persuade him to extradite them back to Mecca. The Muslim refugees, claimed the Quraysh, were blasphemers and fugitives.

The Negus invited Jafar, cousin of Muhammad and leader of the Muslim group, to answer the charges. Jafar explained that Muhammad was a prophet of the same God who had confirmed his revelation to Jesus, and recited aloud the Quranic account of the virginal conception of Christ in the womb of Mary:

And make mention of Mary in the Scripture, when she had withdrawn from her people to a chamber looking East,
And had chosen seclusion from them. Then We sent unto her Our Spirit and it assumed for her the likeness of a perfect man.
She said: Lo! I seek refuge in the Beneficent One from thee, if thou art God-fearing.
He said: I am only a messenger of thy Lord, that I may bestow on thee a faultless son.
She said: How can I have a son when no mortal hath touched me, neither have I been unchaste?
He said: So (it will be). Thy Lord saith: It is easy for Me. And (it will be) that We may make of him a revelation for mankind and a mercy from Us, and it is a thing ordained.
Quran, 19:16-21

Karen Armstrong writes, in her biography of Muhammad, that “when Jafar finished, the beauty of the Quran had done its work. The Negus was weeping so hard that his beard was wet, and the tears poured down the cheeks of his bishops and advisers so copiously that their scrolls were soaked.” The Muslims remained in Abyssinia, under the protection of the Negus, and were able to practise their religion freely.

However, for Muslims, the Virgin Birth is not evidence of Jesus’s divinity, only of his unique importance as a prophet and a messiah. The Trinity is rejected by Islam, as is Jesus’s Crucifixion and Resurrection.

The common theological ground seems to narrow at this point – as Jonathan Bartley, co-director of the Christian think tank Ekklesia, argues, the belief in the Resurrection is the “deal-breaker”. He adds: “There is a fundamental tension at the heart of interfaith dialogue that neither side wants to face up to, and that is that the orthodox Christian view of Jesus is blasphemous to Muslims and the orthodox Muslim view of Jesus is blasphemous to Christians.” He has a point.

The Quran singles out Christianity for formulating the concept of the Trinity:

Do not say, “Three” – Cease! That is better for you. God is one God. Glory be to Him, [high exalted is He] above having a son.
Quran 4:171

It castigates Christianity for the widespread practice among its sects of worshipping Jesus and Mary, and casts the criticism in the form of an interrogation of Jesus by God:

And when God will say: “O Jesus, son of Mary, did you say to the people, ‘Take me and my mother as gods besides God’?” he will
say, “Glory be to You, it was not for me to say what I had no right [to say]! If I had said it, You would have known it.
Quran 5:116

Jesus, as Khalidi points out, “is a controversial prophet. He is the only prophet in the Quran who is deliberately made to distance himself from the doctrines that his community is said to hold of him.” For example, Muslims believe that Jesus was not crucified but was raised bodily to heaven by God.

Yet many Muslim scholars have maintained that the Islamic conception of Jesus – shorn of divinity; outside the Trinity; a prophet – is in line with the beliefs and teachings of some of the earliest Jewish-Christian sects, such as the Ebionites and the Nazarenes, who believed Jesus to be the Messiah, but not divine.

Muslims claim the Muslim Jesus is the historical Jesus, stripped of a later, man-made “Christology”: “Jesus as he might have been without St Paul or St Augustine or the Council of Nicaea”, to quote the Cambridge academic John Casey.

Or, as A N Wilson wrote in the Daily Express a decade ago: “Islam is a moral and intellectual acknowledgement of the lordship of God without the encumbrance of Christian mythological baggage . . . That is why Christianity will decline in the next millennium, and the religious hunger of the human heart will be answered by the Crescent, not the Cross.” Despite the major doctrinal differences, there remain areas of significant overlap, such as on the second coming of Christ.

Both Muslims and Christians subscribe to the belief that before the world ends Jesus will return to defeat the Antichrist, whom Muslims refer to as Dajjal.

The idea of a Muslim Jesus, in whatever doctrinal form, may help fortify the resolve of those scholars who talk of the need to reformulate the exclusivist concept of a Judaeo-Christian civilisation and refer instead to a “Judaeo-Christian-Muslim civilisation”.

This might be anathema to evangelical Christians – especially in the US, where populist preachers such as Franklin Graham see Islam as a “very evil and wicked religion” – but, as Khalidi points out, “While the Jewish tradition by and large rejects Jesus, the Islamic tradition, especially Sufi or mystical Islam, constructs a place for him at the very centre of its devotions.”

Nonetheless, Jesus remains an esoteric part of Islamic faith and practice. Where, for example, is the Islamic equivalent of Christmas? Why do Muslims celebrate the birth of the Prophet Muhammad but not that of the Prophet Jesus? “We, too, in our own way should celebrate the birth of Jesus . . . [because] he is so special to us,” says Mogra. “But I think each religious community has distinct celebrations, so Muslims will celebrate their own and Christians their own.”

In recent years, the right-wing press in Britain has railed against alleged attempts by “politically correct” local authorities to downplay or even suppress Christmas. Birmingham’s attempt to name its seasonal celebrations “Winterval” and Luton’s Harry Potter-themed lights, or “Luminos”, are notorious examples.

There is often a sense that such decisions are driven by the fear that outward displays of Christian faith might offend British Muslim sensibilities, but, given the importance of Jesus in Islam, such fears seem misplaced. Mogra, who leads the MCB’s interfaith relations committee, concurs: “It’s a ridiculous suggestion to change the name of Christmas.” He adds: “Britain is great when it comes to celebrating diverse religious festivals of our various faith communities. They should remain named as they are, and we should celebrate them all.”

Mogra is brave to urge Muslims to engage in an outward and public celebration of Jesus, in particular his birth, in order to match the private reverence that Muslims say they have for him. Is there a danger, however, that Muslim attempts to re-establish the importance of Jesus within Islam and as an integral part of their faith and tradition might be misinterpreted?

Might they be misconstrued as part of a campaign by a supposedly resurgent and politicised Islam to try to take “ownership” of Jesus, in a western world in which organised Christianity is in seeming decline? Might it be counterproductive for interfaith relations? Church leaders, thankfully, seem to disagree.

“I have always enjoyed spending time with Muslim friends, with whom we as Christians have so much in common, along with Jewish people, as we all trace our faith back to Abraham,” the Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, tells me. “When I visit a mosque, having been welcomed in the name of ‘Allah and His Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon Him’, I respond with greetings ‘in the name of Jesus Christ, whom you Muslims revere as a prophet, and whom I know as the Saviour of the World, the Prince of Peace’.”

Amid tensions between the Christian west and the Islamic east, a common focus on Jesus – and what Khalidi calls a “salutary” reminder of when Christianity and Islam were more open to each other and willing to rely on each other’s witness – could help close the growing divide between the world’s two largest faiths. Mogra agrees: “We don’t have to fight over Jesus. He is special for Christians and Muslims. He is bigger than life. We can share him.”

Reverend David Marshall, one of the Church of England’s specialists on Islam, cites the concluding comments from the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, at a recent seminar for Christian and Muslim scholars. He said he had been encouraged by “the quality of our disagreement”. “Christians and Muslims disagree on many points and will continue to do so – but how we disagree is not predetermined,” says Marshall.

“Muslims are called by the Quran to ‘argue only in the best way with the People of the Book’ [Quran 29:46], and Christians are encouraged to give reasons for the hope that is within them, ‘with gentleness and reverence’ [1 Peter 3:15]. If we can do this, we have no reason to be afraid.”

“The Muslim Jesus” by Tarif Khalidi is published by Harvard University Press (£14.95)

Mehdi Hasan is the NS’s senior editor (politics)

Note 1: If based on the Quran, The two religions may reach a consensus. The whole problems in Islam is that they give more importance to the Hadith or stories told about the life and behaviour of Muhammad. The Moslems may memorize the Quran, but they like much better the side stories that have no relationship to the Quran fundamentals.

Note 2: Marie was called The Virgin because she served as a virgin girl in the Great Temple of Carmel with other girls from the elite families in the district of Tyr (Lebanon)

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Assyrian myths transformed into Religious Stories in the Bibles and the Quran

The stories and myths in Assyrian and Sumerian mythologies were transformed into Jewish and Islamic sanctified stories. These legends emerged in current Iraq (Assyria, Babylonia and Ur) before 3500 BC or around 4000 years before the era of Islam.

The stories spread and moved into Jewish religious books, and deployed from Iraq to Palestine and then to Mekka,  Medinah, Yemen and the Mashreq countries.

There was presence of many foreign immigrants in the Arabic Peninsula. For example, the young Iraqi from Mosul who served water and grapes to the Prophet Muhammad at Taif as its inhabitants were stoning  Muhammad, and the Persian Salman, Suhaib and Bilal the Abyssinian…

These are some of the myths of ancient Iraq and corresponding in Islam.

1. The legend of the flood: in an Assyrian mythology the gods determined to annihilate mankind and they warned Uttonbshtm and his wife and sons. He was to build a great ship and put a couple of each kind of animal. In the Koran the same story and details with the one difference is that the hero is Nou7 (Noah).

Archaeological excavations uncovered that the flood covered 300 miles in the old city of Ur.

Details of the flood are identical between Iraqi and Jewish mythology, and in the  Islamic text the flood was intended to  punish humans who have rotted in the ground except a good man, his family and a number of animal-build ship and resort group are excluded from it.

Send birds to explore the Earth after the flood recedes.
The Prophet Abraham came from Ur old Iraqi city in the South and brought with him the story of the flood.

2. Trip to heavengods Adaba corresponding story of ISRA ‘ and mi’raj.

-Journey to the sky: gods Etana, the bird Eagle offset in the Quran the Prophet Muhammad’s journey to the bright sky in Ascension.
-The journey of Gilgamesh to paradise.
3. Paradise in the legends of Iraq in the Pharaonic monuments mentioned paradise and their descriptions. In both cases where the rivers and trees and eternal life, a garden of Eden.

Eden is a word derived from the word Eden Sumerian and means easy and flat ground and the location of the garden of Eden in the South of Mesopotamia.

The idea of paradise appeared and was invented by the Sumerians in Iraq and then moved to the Canaanites and then the Pharaohs then moved to Jews and Muslims.
4. The underworld of floors:  in Islam the 7 earths.
-Demons and goblins appeared in legends of the old Iraq as set out in the Qur’an and Hadith.
5. The story of the beginning of the creation of the universe when Iraqi veterans (the sea was the first in the creation of the universe):  in the Qur’an (the throne over the water).
The journey to the underworld = Islam shake them down low.
Seven days seven nights – using the number seven is repeated seven earths skies in Islam, seven 7 days.
6. Expulsion from paradise and eternity: God’s wrath on the ethics for refusing his food and the expulsion of immortality and paradise to land in Islam expelled Adam from paradise for he ate of the tree was the same story in Jewish books (Torah) before Islam the same meaning of the Qur’an.

7. Hell-the seven gates of the underworld.
Big doormen in the underworld: equivalent in Islam there is paradise Ranger Rizwan guard fire.
Eternity of God is only matched in the Qur’an God live and not die.
Gilgamesh is grappling with the divine bull that represents seven years lean-lean in the Qur’an in seven years.
Repetition in speech when the Assyrians – Kan Muhammad repeats certain phrases a lot.
Cleansing, washing the God Oruro = offset ablution in Islam.
The God Enki restored life to the goddess Inanna after death = ISA Hayat returned the dead.
The God Enki eat eight plants and fuck that befell it because of that = offset in Islam and Judaism the Adam ate from the tree and was cursed and the anger and the expulsion from paradise.
The God Enki became ill in his rib and Lady of the gods were invited to his recovery = corresponding create women’s rib.
-The God Enlil sending plagues to kill humans in the story of Moses, = and in the Qur’an God take revenge from the people of Egypt sent a plague on them.
8. Eternity is obedience to God = Islam to obey human beings to God their intervention paradise eternity.
-Was thought in ancient Iraq that the kindness of God and satisfaction of human disease and saves lengthens age = and the same belief in Islam.
-Babylonian goddess Ishtar Arabic versions were called LAT and ‘ Uzza and Manat (warrior goddesses in the Arabic Peninsula).
-The rise of the goddess Inanna of death = in Islam Jesus resurrects the dead and God limit people and then animates them.
9. The separation of the soul from the body = Islam out of the spirit of death.
-Pad in legends of Assyria and Babylon = palette and fatalism in Islam.
-The legend of ancient Iraqi culture similar to the story of Adam and Eve and take out them from paradise.
-A person must die when the Assyrian gods that = in Islam God decides when a human dies.

Note 1: What the author mentions as Assyrian mythology is a direct hand me down transcript from one Empire to another in Iraq and Greater Syria that I call The Land (countries west of the Euphrates River and including south west Turkey, Lebanon, Palestine and Jordan). The Assyrian Empire is one of the latest that conquered other empires in the Land. These mythologies go as far back as 4,000 years before Christian calendar, and span the Empires of Akkad, Sumer, Babylon, Canaan…

Note 2: What the western countries label as the three monolithic religions are in fact a single one in 3 main versions. The Old Testament or Bible was written in Alexandria two centuries before the coming of Christ. The New testament was written in several languages: Byzantium Empire selected 4 Books that happened to be written in popular Greek (not the elite formal Greek). All the many dozens of Books were labelled Heretics, burned, discarded, and lost for lack of heretic Christian sects to transcribe and disseminate. The Quran was written in many Arabic slang languages (which are derived from the Aramaic, the language of the people in the Land. The third caliph Ibn Affan decided to rewrite the Quran in the Mecca slang of the tribe of Quraich.

Note 3: Actually, besides the mythical or typical stories of the Land, the Old Testament is a description of the customs and traditions of The Land, and everything else is pure historical falsification, kind of extending a history to roaming tribes. For over a century now, Israel and the Zionist movement couldn’t locate a single archaeological finding that prove the existence of the Kingdoms of David or Solomon or any Jewish artefact: The Jews remained mostly bedwin tribes in the land of Canaan (current Palestine and southern parts of Syria and Lebanon) and never reached the seashore at any moment in their existence in Palestine

https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2009/09/19/complete-story-of-jesus-visit-to-jerusalem/

Note 4: References: book flight to paradise and hell in the legends of the old Iraq – a Ministry of culture and information, 1998-book mythology in Mesopotamia-Baghdad 1984 book of Ishtar and Tammuz and tragedy book epic of Gilgamesh – Beirut and many Arabic and translated books on religion and mythology in ancient Iraq Sumer, Assyria and Babylon Sami dj_jigga civilized dialogue-number: 2354-7/26/2008

Note 5: The Arabic text posted on FB by Zahrat Al Mandella

أساطير أشورية صارت مقدسات إسلاميةالأساطير والقصص ظهرت في العراق القديم في أشور وبابل قبل 3500 عام قبل الميلاد أي حوالي 4000 عام قبل عصر ظهور الإسلام.
وانتشرت وانتقلت إلى اليهود وادخلوها ضمن كتبهم الدينية والذين انتشروا وانتقلوا من العراق إلى فلسطين ومنها إلى المدينة المنورة وبلدان المشرق.

وكان هناك وجود للعراقيين في مكة وما جاورها فالشاب الذي قدم الماء والعنب للنبي محمد في الطائف عندما زارها للدعوة لدينه وقابله أهلها بالرجم بالحجارة كان شابا عراقيا مسيحيا من الموصل وكان في مكة والمدينة أشخاص من بلدان عديدة مثل صهيب الرومي وسلمان الفارسي وبلال الحبشي مما يعنى وجود مهاجرين وانتقال ثقافات وتلاقى وانتقال أفكار.
وهذه بعض الأساطير العراقية القديمة وما يقابلها في الإسلام:
– أسطورة الطوفان : في أساطير أشورية أن الآلهة عزمت على محق البشر وأنها أنذرت أوتونبشتم وزوجته بذلك فبنو سفينة عظيمة ووضعوا ا فيها زوجين من كل نوع من الحيوانات ونجو من الطوفان وفى القران نفس القصة والتفاصيل مع فارق واحد هو أن بطلها نوح بدل أوتو نبشتم وجود دلائل على وقوع طوفان نهرى حقيقي في مناطق من العراق في الألف الثالث قبل الميلاد.
من خلال الحفريات الأثرية وغطى الطوفان 300 ميل ووجدت في الحفريات آثار الطمي في مدينة أور من أثار الطوفان.
تفاصيل الطوفان متطابقة بين الأساطير العراقية واليهودية والنص الإسلامي الهدف من الطوفان عقاب البشر الذين افسدوا في الأرض باستثناء رجل صالح وعائلته وعدد من الحيوانات – بناء السفينة ولجوء المجموعة المستثناة من العقاب إليها.
إرسال طيور لاستطلاع الأرض بعد انحسار الطوفان.
– إبراهيم النبي جاء من أور المدينة العراقية القديمة في الجنوب وجلب معه قصة الطوفان.

– رحلة الإلهة إيتانا إلى السماء على طائر النسر يقابلها في القران رحلة النبي محمد على البراق إلى السماء في الإسراء والمعراج.
– رحلة جلجامش إلى الفردوس الأرضي.
– الجنة وردت في أساطير العراق ووردت في الآثار الفرعونية ذكر الجنة وأوصافها وفى كلتا الحالتين ذكر أن فيها انهار وأشجار وحياة أبدية كلمة جنة عدن – عدن كلمة عدن مشتقة من كلمة إيدن السومرية وتعنى سهل وارض منبسطة وموقع جنة عدن في جنوب وادي الرافدين وفكرة الفردوس والجنة ظهرت واخترعها السومريون في العراق ثم انتقلت إلى الكنعانيين ثم الفراعنة ثم انتقلت إلى اليهود والمسلمين.
– العالم السفلى مكون من طوابق = في الإسلام الأرضون السبع.
– الشياطين والعفاريت وردت في أساطير العراق القديم كما وردت في القرآن والحديث.
– في قصة بداية إنشاء الكون عند العراقيين القدماء (كان البحر الأول في خلق الكون) = في القرآن (كان عرشه على الماء).
الرحلة إلى العالم السفلى = في الإسلام يخسف بهم أسفل سافلين.
سبعة أيام سبعة ليال – استخدام الرقم سبعة يتكرر في الإسلام سموات سبع أرضون سبع سبعة أيام.
الطرد من الجنة والخلود: غضب الإله على آدابا لأنه رفض الطعام المقدم له وطرد من الخلود والجنة إلى ارض وفى الإسلام طرد ادم من الجنة لأنه أكل من الشجرة ووردت نفس القصة في كتب اليهود ( التوراة) قبل الإسلام بنفس المعنى الوارد في القرآن.
الجحيم – البوابات السبع للعالم السفلي.
الرحلة إلى العالم السفلى = في الإسلام يخسف بهم أسفل سافلين.
سبعة أيام سبعة ليال – استخدام الرقم سبعة يتكرر في الإسلام سموات سبع أرضون سبع سبعة أيام.
الطرد من الجنة والخلود: غضب الإله على آدابا لأنه رفض الطعام المقدم له وطرد من الخلود والجنة إلى ارض وفى الإسلام طرد ادم من الجنة لأنه أكل من الشجرة ووردت نفس القصة في كتب اليهود ( التوراة) قبل الإسلام بنفس المعنى الوارد في القرآن.
الجحيم – البوابات السبع للعالم السفلي.
كبير البوابين في العالم السفلى يقابله في الإسلام رضوان حارس الجنة وهناك حارس النار.
الخلود من نصيب الآلهة فقط يقابله في القران الله حي لا يموت.
جلجامش يصارع الثور الإلهي الذي يمثل سبع سنوات عجاف – في القرآن سبع سنوات عجاف.
التكرار في الكلام عند الأشوريين – كان النبي محمد يكرر بعض العبارات كثيرا.
التطهير بغسل اليدين الإلهة أورورو = يقابله الوضوء في الإسلام.
الإله أنكي أعاد الحياة إلى الإلهة أنانا بعد موتها = عيسى أعاد الحياة للأموات.
الإله أنكي أكل من النباتات الثمانية واللعنة التي حلت عليه بسبب ذلك = يقابل ذلك في الإسلام واليهودية قصة ادم الذي أكل من الشجرة وحلت عليه اللعنة والغضب وطرد من الجنة.
الإله أنكي أصيب بمرض في ضلعه ودعيت سيدة من الآلهة لشفائه = يقابل ذلك خلق المرأة من الضلع.
– الإله إنليل يرسل الأوبئة لقتل البشر= وفي قصة موسى في القران الله ينتقم من أهل مصر بإرسال الوباء عليهم.
– الخلود مرتبط بطاعة البشر للآلهة = وفى الإسلام طاعة البشر لله تدخلهم الجنة دار الخلود.
– ساد الاعتقاد في العراق القديم أن عطف الآلهة ورضاها ينقذ البشر من الأمراض ويطيل أعمارهم = ونفس الاعتقاد في الإسلام.
– الإلهة البابلية عشتار كانت لها نسخ عربية تسمى اللات والعزى ومناة.
– نهوض الإلهة أنانا من الموت = في الإسلام عيسى أحيا الموتى والله يميت الناس ثم يحييهم.
– انفصال الروح عن الجسد = في الإسلام خروج الروح من الجسد علامة الموت.
– لوح القدر في أساطير أشور وبابل = لوح القدر والقضاء والقدر في الإسلام.
– أسطورة أدابا العراقية القديمة تشابه قصة ادم وحواء وخرجهما من الجنة.
– لا بد للإنسان أن يموت عندما تقرر الآلهة الأشورية ذلك = في الإسلام الله يقرر متى يموت الإنسان.

المراجع:

كتاب الرحلة إلى الفردوس والجحيم في أساطير العراق القديم – إصدار وزارة الثقافة والإعلام العراقية 1998 –
وكتاب الأساطير في بلاد مابين النهرين – بغداد 1984
وكتاب عشتار ومأساة تموز وكتاب ملحمة جلجامش – بيروت وكثير من الكتب العربية والمترجمة عن الدين والأساطير في العراق القديم سومر وأشور وبابل

سامي كوكابي الحوار المتمدن – العدد: 2354 – 2008 / 7 / 26

 


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adonis49

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