Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘racism

Notes and tidbits on FB and Twitter. Part 76

C’est ce “presque” qui fait peur. On n’acquiet jamais assez de confience pour s’acheminer avec désinvolture.

C’est malin ceux qui savent d’avance comment serviront leurs efforts investis á étudier

Je n’ai jamais essayé d’avoir une idée détaillée de la cartographie du prestige

C’est vaillant de ta part d’essayer de t’intégrer dans une société nouvelle. Comment tu géres ta condition de fou hilare et de l’accepter?

Becoming a specialist in the numeric propaganda with the Islamic State must have been a close initiation and cooperation with foreign secret services to foment the atrocious upheavals in the Middle East.

You feel that most of our fumbling in life is the Fear of missing the shortest road to happiness.

Perception of what is considered Passion or passionate is the main difference between gender and how girlfriends start to despise the other

Soldier mindset?” Some information, some ideas, feel like our allies. We want them to win. We want to defend them. And other information or ideas are the enemy, and we want to shoot them down.

Un pays provincial ou’ personne ne se retrousse les manches pour reorganiser epour que quelque chose marche. Si les  mouvements civil des citadins de Beirut ne s’ etendent pas ailleurs, wa taghyeer ra7 nshouf

L’ Amerique Blanche est un syndicat, deploye’ pour proteger son pouvoir exclusif de domination et de control sur les corps Noirs et Latine. Sinon, les Blancs cesseraient d’ exister.

La haine, tu ne peux pas lui faire baisser les yeux

Tu ne peux pas enchainer la peur qui harcele les gardiens

“You are becoming civilized in Lebanon” said the British lady as she heard of an assassination robbery in 1960. They were very rare at the period.

England had banned slavery before the American Independence war. The colonies didn’t want to have anything with that law. The Black slaves flocked to join the British army. France engagement changed the course of history

Sache que l’ esprit et l’ ame sont le corps et le cerveau, qui sont destructible, donc precieuse.

Le corps des Noirs en Amerique avant la guerre de secession valait $4 milliars, bien plus que toutes l’ industry Americaines et les chemin de fer.

The secession war was primarily meant to rob the southern states from cheap slave workforce once they start industrialization, a huge impediment to competition with northern states.

When you read the American Declaration of Independence, keep in mind they meant the White Men rights only.

L’ esclavage represente l’ interet materiel le plus important du monde (Declaration de l’ etat du Mississippi en quittant l’ Union)

The emancipation law of the Blacks at the end of the civil war was meant to give an illusory moral excuse to the purely materialistic purposes of the thousands killed and maimed. It was Not meant to give the Blacks equal rights as the whites

Le courage se forge d’ une habitude repetee’, comme detourner les yeux devant l’ horreur des systemes carcerals racists et odieuses

Le racism est une politique obsede par l’ idee d’absolution individuel.

On lutte, pas pour une victoire acquise, mais pour garantir une vie honorable et saine dans la justice pour tous.

Pour les minoritaires, l’ erreur coute toujours bien plus cher.

 

 

Ghost, supernatural belief… and racism. And Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Adam Serwer posted this May 4, 2014:

Basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar said Sunday that white Americans so disregard the ongoing existence of racism that they’re more likely to believe in ghosts.

More whites believe in ghosts than believe in racism,” Abdul-Jabbar, a former center for the Los Angeles Lakers, told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos on Sunday.

”That’s why we have shows like Ghostbusters and don’t have shows like Racistbuster. You know, it’s something that’s still part of our culture and people hold on to some of these ideas and practices just out of habit and saying that, well, that’s the way it always was. But things have to change.”

Retired basketball star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar speaks at a news conference after National Basketball Association Commissioner Adam Silver made an announcement regarding Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, in Los Angeles, Calif., April 29, 2014.
Retired basketball star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar speaks at a news conference after National Basketball Association Commissioner Adam Silver made an announcement regarding Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, in Los Angeles, Calif., April 29, 2014. David McNew/Reuters

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: More whites believe in ghosts than racism

The panel was discussing Donald Sterling, the white billionaire owner of the LA Clippers who was banned for life from the National Basketball Association after a recording of him making racist remarks about blacks was leaked to the media.

The Ghostbusters franchise probably isn’t reflective of Americans’ belief in ghosts any more than comic book movies are reflective of Americans’ belief in superpowers – and “To Catch A Racist” would be a much better name for the kind of show Abdul-Jabar is envisioning than “Racistbuster.” The real question, however, is if Abdul-Jabbar was correct.

It’s hard to know what measures he was using, but a large number of Americans do believe in ghosts – 42%, according to a Harris Poll from late last year.

A Pew survey from 2009 found that 29% of whites believe that they’ve been in touch with a dead person, and 17% believe they’ve actually interacted with a ghost.

Another Pew survey from 2010 showed that whites are far less likely than blacks to believe that there is ongoing discrimination against black Americans, with 88% of blacks saying there was some or a lot of discrimination, and only 57% of whites saying so.

Only 16% of whites said there is “a lot” of discrimination against blacks today, compared to 46% of blacks.

Based on those numbers, more white Americans believe in racism than ghosts. But there is still a significant gap between whites and blacks regarding the influence of racism in American life.

While Abdul-Jabbar’s numbers seem to be off, the general point that whites are more likely to discount racism while blacks see it as an ongoing problem is undoubtedly true.

 

POLITICSNATION WITH AL SHARPTON, 5/1/14, 6:47 PM ET

As if Racism awakened with the influx of Syrian refugees

In the last 3 years, Syrians have been fleeing to Lebanon and currently constitute over 25% of the population.
The slowness of aids arriving from international community and this unstable political system in Lebanon aggravated the conditions of both the Syrian refugees and the Lebanese citizens, where they live close to the regions of  refugees concentrations such as the town of Ersal, Akkar district, city of Tripoli, the Bekaa Valley and the Arkoub in the south.
The Campaign in Support of Syrians facing Racism (Arabic: الحملة الداعمة للسوريين بوجه العنصريّة) was launched on March 21, 2014.
This campaign coincides with the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, “in rejection of all violence towards Syrians [in Lebanon], racist political rhetoric and the associated media hype.”

Lebanese Launch Campaign in Support of Syrians Facing Racism

 This campaign aims to tackle what is perceived as growing discrimination against Syrian refugees living in Lebanon.

Lebanese politicians are being accused by activists of using rising tensions between Syrians refugees and Lebanese inhabitants of some areas of Lebanon for politically-motivated purposes.

After the “I am not a Martyr” campaign in honor of Mohammad Chaar and the “I am not naked” campaign first in support of Olympic skier Jackie Chamoun and then against Domestic Violence, the anti-racism campaign is using the same (and now-familiar) method of online protest featuring average citizens posting selfies and carrying a message.

Speaking to leading French language Lebanese newspaper “L’Orient-le Jour”, one of the activists participating in the campaign said:

Politicians can’t even resolve basic problems such supplying gas and electricity, facilitating affordable public transportation, stopping violence in Tripoli and Hermel, passing laws related to domestic violence, lowering the expensive telecommunication… These problems existed before the arrival of Syrian refugees and our politicians did not solve them. They never want to solve anything, they never did.

Here are a few examples of those participating:

“If you accept us, you are welcomed in Lebanon”

"And our house is your house if you're willing to accept us parents to parents, brothers to brothers

Once, a Syrian made us proud

I once met a Syrian who made us both proud

Above: The Humanist. Below: The Racist

He didn't escape death [in his country] to die of humiliation [in your country]

He fled from sure death, and Not to die from indignity

Not every Syrian is a criminal and not every Lebanese is innocent

The Syrian refugee is like us: he can't live. Direct your anger towards the corrupt ruling class.

Re-direct your anger at the ruling class, this bloated and corrupt class

I'm a human before being a Syrian.

I am a person before being a Syrian. (A reminder of the saying of the French essayist Montaigne)

Say no to racism. Lebanon is a small country, but with a big heart.

90% of our houses are built by Syrians. Stay a racist and leave your house.

90% of our homes were built by Syrian workers. Be consistent with your racist attitude and leave your house.

Some even went further to criticize colonial legacy.

Whoever divided these grounds for 'immigrants' to cross borders to another country... I won't say 'welcome' because this is not just my country.

And they even hanged a sign over a highway:

Dear Syrian, welcome! welcome to Lebanon

How ABC’s “Alice in Arabia” Is Racist?

Have you seen a US film that talk nice of “Arabs” or “Moslems”?

Have you seen a US movie or TV program that talk bad of Jews , Zionism or the State of Israel?

Do you think the narratives on Jews or about Jews are done by non Jews or anyone not supporting the State of Israel?

Do you know of a narrative on “Arabs” or Moslems in the US done by an “Arab” or a Moslem?

Do you know that the “Arab World” is constituted of two dozen independent States and this Arab World has at least four major differences, such as the North African countries, the Nile region States, the Arabic peninsula and the Gulf Emirates and the Syrian Nation (Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan and Palestine?)

The pilot, which riffs on the Alice in Wonderland tale, reinforces old racist tropes:   an American girl (presumably a white girl) is threatened by scary “other” people of color.

American Muslims have lost control of their narratives both online and in the media.

While violent Islamic extremists have grown increasingly adept at using social media to craft their messages – as have anti-Muslim activists – more normative voices from Muslims have been drowned out.

Rabia Chaudry posted this March 19, 2014

The lack of control over self-articulated narratives was exemplified yesterday with the announcement of ABC Family’s new pilot programs, which include a show that got the attention of Arab and Muslim Americans across social media.

One such pilot, “Alice in Arabia” — a title cringe-worthy in itself — has been described as follows:

“Alice in Arabia” is a high-stakes drama series about a rebellious American teenage girl who, after tragedy befalls her parents, is unknowingly kidnapped by her extended family, who are Saudi Arabian.

Alice finds herself a stranger in a new world but is intrigued by its offerings and people, whom she finds surprisingly diverse in their views on the world and her situation.

Now a virtual prisoner in her grandfather’s royal compound, Alice must count on her independent spirit and wit to find a way to return home while surviving life behind the veil.”

(Frequent regurgitated plot: no imagination when applied to the “Arab World” situation)

108224805
Dieter Spears—Getty Images/Vetta

The Twittersphere exploded with the hashtag #AliceinArabia, as people tweeted their offense to ABC Family. The criticisms are plentiful and varied.

1. The show reinforces old racist tropes in which an American girl (presumably a white girl) is threatened by scary “other” people of color.

Considering the sordid history of Americans vilifying Native American men and then black men as dangerous to white women, it is a completely understandable objection.

2. The entire framework of the show is through the kidnap plotline, confirming the kinds of fears about Arabs, Iranians and Muslims that the movie “Not Without My Daughter” established decades ago.

3. The show certainly pits Americans against “Arabs” (tweeters pointed out “Arabia” is not actually a place), and we can assume the “independent spirit and wit” of Alice the American will prevail as triumphant over the lesser evolved Arabians. Thus the plot both bolsters the highly troublesome binary of us vs. them (Muslims being them), a factor linked to the growth of anti-Muslim bigotry and hate crimes in the US since 9/11, and confirms American superiority.

4. Not only will “Alice in Arabia” exacerbate the marginalization of Muslim and Arab men, it perfectly reflects Western attitudes towards Muslim women. Hear that sound?

It’s millions of Muslim women snorting as Alice attempts to survive “life behind the veil.”

The very idea that the veil is something to be survived strips Muslim women of their intellect and agency and makes them the subjects of this practice rather than sentient protagonists 5. of it.

5. The pilot uses the real-life difficulties faced by women in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as a platform for ratings, and diminishes the work of activists in and outside the country to effect meaningful reform.

An imported heroine, who is both the victim and the great white hope, not only smacks of Orientalism but frames serious issues through her narrative alone. In doing so, it reaffirms the fact that overwhelmingly the stories in the West of Muslims and Arabs are not actually being told by Muslims and Arabs.

The challenges of Muslims in the West are many, but there is no question that having control over our narratives and the messages about our faith are paramount.

These narratives shape public opinion, impact civil liberties, and even influence our foreign policy.

In failing to self-define ourselves, our culture and our faith we lose authority both to religious extremists and anti-Muslim bigots.

It can only be hoped that ABC Family and other media outlets are paying attention.

The American Muslim community is ripe with talent and voices who can actually tell these stories in relevant, meaningful, and authentic ways.

Portraying Muslims and Arabs as nuanced Americans instead of foreign caricatures would be a good first step for television.

Instead of reaching across the globe for “Alice in Arabia,” perhaps we should start here at home with “Ahmed in Austin”.

Lebanese kidnapped in Syria: What kinds of retaliations?

Many Syrian workers are virtually trapped in Lebanon because their Syrian home cities are war zones. Syrian workers are the backbone of Lebanon Real Estates development: When they have to flee back to Syria or go on vacation for the Eid of Adha or Ramadan or…, construction simply stops, and the Lebanese engaged in civil works also take the opportunity to take a vacation…

For example, Egyptian workers mane the gas stations and the health care in hospital and private homes for the elderly

On May 22, news broke of the kidnapping of 11 Lebanese men in Aleppo , of the Moslem Shia sect returning from pilgrimage in Iraq, by a Syrian opposition group. Scores of angry Lebanese men took to the streets, intent on revenge, and they were looking for handy simple Syrian workers in the vicinity.

Fortunately, Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah intervened with a speech saying, “The Syrian nationals in Lebanon are our people and attacking them is an offense.” Nasrallah’s words hold much sway among followers and fans, and he saved many from being beaten, or worse.

Moe Ali Nayel published on July 29, 2012 under “Syrian Workers in Lebanon: No Time is Safe...”

 

One of the Syrian workers (Photo: Haitham Moussawi)

That incident of mutual kidnapping activities and retaliations is not unique in Lebanon’s history with its Syrian labor force. Whenever Syria-related political unrest threatens Lebanon, the Syrian workers are the first to suffer. As if they were official representatives of the Syrian regime, the workers are an easy first target.

“It’s becoming dangerous for Syrians working in Lebanon,” Jihad, a 29 year-old Syrian worker from Daraa told me.

“My friends were stopped in Ouzai [Beirut suburbs] by thugs who erected a checkpoint in the middle of the street.” Jihad expressed relief at Nasrallah’s appeal: “I was relieved when Nasrallah came out and asked the masses to leave us alone. His call saved us.”

Jihad, who has worked in Beirut for many years, does menial jobs that many Lebanese consider beneath them. This attitude holds true for the vast number of foreign workers in Lebanon — many of them Syrians, Egyptians, Ethiopians,… — who come to work as cleaners, domestic help, construction and agricultural workers.

Lebanon’s labor laws provide a further incentive for Syrians to emigrate here. The interpretation of these laws make it easy for businesses to import foreign labor, thereby avoiding minimum wage regulations and calls by local workers to improve working conditions.

Itani says he would rather have ten Syrian workers than five Lebanese. 

Jihad the foreign workers like him have a continuing sense of instability. For example:

Following the 2005 assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri — in which Syria was accused of involvement — there were violent attacks on Syrians throughout Lebanon and many were forced to flee. Today, Jihad explains, “It’s ironic, I’ve been working here in Ras Beirut for 20 years. When Hariri was killed we were attacked by the residents… We had to flee back to Syria. We returned after the hate against us lessened and the Lebanese realized that they need us to get things done.”

Many Syrian workers are virtually trapped in Lebanon because their Syrian home cities are war zones. There has been much focus on the safety of Syrian activists taking refuge in Lebanon, while the safety of Syrian workers has been overlooked. Activists have made their stories heard while a multitude of workers’ stories have gone unnoticed.

Ali Atiyeh a 34-year-old Syrian who has worked in Lebanon for 15 years as an electrician, has experienced daily racism. “Any interaction with the Lebanese people always brings the possibility of a racist encounter. It’s all good until they ask me where I’m from, and when I say I’m from Syria their faces change.”

Atiyeh who speaks the Lebanese dialect adds that he feels slightly different from most Syrian workers. “I have been integrated into the Lebanese way of life. I spend money, go out, and always buy new clothes”. But even with his integration he never feels totally safe. “For example if I’m coming back home from work late at night and there is a police checkpoint and I get stopped, I’m automatically a suspect because I’m Syrian.”

“The latest trend is men driving around at night stopping Syrian workers. The men claim that they are security forces. They mug the worker and drive away,” Atiyeh says.

Racism doesn’t stop there either. According to Atiyeh, “Now that the Syrian revolution is fashionable it has become cool for some Lebanese girls to go out with Syrian activists, while two years ago this was out of the question. I once loved a Lebanese girl and we went out in secret. I knew her family and they treated me as one of them. I decided to propose and asked her father if he agreed to us getting married. After that I was outcast from the family — the mother told me that she would never let her daughter marry a Syrian.”

Many Syrian workers live in extreme poverty; several may share small apartments while others live in tents, shacks, or outdoors on the construction sites where they work. They are therefore visible and an easy target for attacks by Lebanese.

Raed, 17, a Syrian shoe shiner and freelance worker in Beirut — his many other jobs include washing stairs in apartment buildings and delivering food and gas — is scared of being attacked. “Now, since the news about the kidnapped Lebanese, people have warned me not leave this neighborhood because they fear for my safety.”

He speaks about an incident in a stronghold of the Amal Movement. “The other day I was in Hay al-Lija and felt that I was not welcome…A man marched up to me and asked me where I’m from in Syria. I told him Aleppo. I did not dare say I’m from Daraa. Then men gathered and showered me with insults about my sister and mother. I was getting scared and a slap to my face came from nowhere. I pushed them and ran away.”

Raed’s story is not unusual, he says: “Workers can never feel secure in Lebanon. Here, where I live now, our burden is a bit easier than before the Syrian revolution. Now people in this area are seeing us as the sons of one sect. They see us now as Sunnis more than Syrians.” The area that Raed is talking about is traditionally a Sunni neighborhood.

Attacks against Syrians have always crossed sectarian lines. All Lebanese sects have at times been hostile towards Syrians. However, the recent uprising has made old enemies into new comrades.

Supporters of Saad Hariri, the son of Rafik, support the Syrian opposition. “Now,” Jihad says, “these same Lebanese greet us, smile and seem to be fond of us. It makes one wonder what this sudden love for the Syrians is — from the same Lebanese who just a few years ago insulted and looked down on us, as if we were not human.”

Migrant workers, foreign domestic workers, racism, Arab Spring…

I published several posts on that subject, and an article a couple of months ago (read link in note), and here Robert Fisk offers several cases and eye-witness accounts on racist behaviors in the Arab World. Robert Fisk wrote:

“How many tracts, books, documentaries, speeches and doctoral theses have been written and produced about Islamophobia? How many denunciations have been made against the French Sarkozy, Le Pens, and the Wilders for their anti-immigration (read largely anti-Muslim) policies or down the far darker paths against the plague of this Norway Breivik-style racism?

The problem with all this is that Muslim societies, whittle down to Middle Eastern societies, are allowed to appear squeaky-clean in the face of such trash, and innocent of any racism themselves.

A health warning to all Arab readers of this column: you may not like this week’s rant from yours truly. Because I fear very much that the video of Alem Dechasa‘s, (Ethiopian mother working as house helper in Lebanon), recent torment in Beirut is all too typical of the treatment meted out to foreign domestic workers across the Arab World (there are 200,000 in Lebanon alone).

Many thousands have now seen the footage of 33-year-old Ms Dechasa being abused and humiliated and pushed into a taxi by Ali Mahfouz, the Lebanese agent who brought her to Lebanon as a domestic worker. Ms Dechasa was transported to hospital where she was placed in the psychiatric wing and where, on 14 March, she hanged herself. She was a mother of two and could not stand the thought of being deported back to her native Ethiopia. That may not have been the only reason for her mental agony.

Lebanese women protested in the centre of Beirut, the UN protested, everyone protested. Ali Mahfouz has been formally accused of contributing to her death. But that’s it.

The Syrian revolt, the Bahraini revolution, the Arab Awakening, have simply washed Alem Dechasa’s tragedy out of the news. For example, how many readers know that not long before Ms Dechasa’s death, a Bengali domestic worker was raped by a policeman guarding her at a courthouse in the south Lebanese town of Nabatieh, after she had been caught fleeing an allegedly abusive employer?

As the Lebanese journalist Anne-Marie El-Hage has eloquently written, Ms Dechasa belonged to “those who submit in silence to the injustice of a Lebanese system that ignores their human rights, a system which literally closes its eyes to conditions of hiring and work often close to slavery“. All too true.

How well I recall the Sri Lanka girl who turned up in Commodore Street at the height of the Israeli siege and shelling of West Beirut in 1982, pleading for help and protection. Like tens of thousands of other domestic workers from the sub-continent, her passport had been taken from her the moment she began her work as a domestic “slave” in the city; and her employers had fled abroad to safety – taking the girl’s passport with them so she could not leave herself. She was rescued by a hotel proprietor when he discovered that local taxi drivers were offering her a “bed” in their vehicles in return for sex.

Everyone who lives in Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt or Syria, or particularly the Gulf States, is well aware of this outrage, albeit cloaked in a pious silence by the politicians and prelates and businessmen of these societies.

In Cairo, at a dinner I remarked to the Egyptian hosts on the awful scars on the face of the young woman serving food to us. I was ostracised for the rest of the meal and never invited again.

Arab societies are dependent on servants. About 25% of Lebanese families have a live-in migrant worker, according to Professor Ray Jureidini of the Lebanese American University in Beirut. They are essential not only for the social lives of their employers (housework and caring for children) but for the broader Lebanese economy.

In the Arab Gulf, the treatment of migrant labour, male and female, has long been a scandal. Men from the subcontinent (India, Bangladesh, Philippine, and mainly Pakistan) often live eight to a room in slums – even in the billionaires’ paradise of Kuwait – and are consistently harassed, treated as third-class citizens, and arrested on the meanest of charges.

Saudi Arabia has the habit of chopping off the heads of migrant workers who were accused of assault or murder or drug-running, after trials that bore no relation to international justice.

For example, in 1993, a Christian Filipino woman accused of killing her employer and his family was dragged into a public square in Dammam and forced to kneel on the ground where her executioner pulled her scarf from her head before decapitating her with a sword.

How about this case in United Arab Emirates?

Sithi Farouq, a 19-year old Sri Lanka housemaid, was accused of killing her employer’s four-year-old daughter in 1994. She claimed her employer’s aunt had accidentally killed the girl. On 13 April, 1995, she was led from her prison cell in the United Arab Emirates to stand in a courtyard in a white abaya gown, crying uncontrollably, before a 9-man firing squad. It was her 20th birthday. God’s mercy, enshrined in the first words of the Koran, could not be extended to her, it seems, in her hour of need.

Note: https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2012/03/18/racist-behaviors-or-cultured-my-ass-environment-in-lebanon/

“Wait sounds Never to my ears”; (Mar. 2, 2010)

            Responding to a letter from White preachers in Alabama considering Martin Luther King activities “unconsidered and tempestuous” he wrote from his prison in Birmingham in 1963 this letter:

            “Any non-violent campaign has to satisfy four stages: first, gather facts of injustices; second, start negotiation; third, endeavor auto-purification; and fourth, set up a program for direct action.  Birmingham is a city where segregation is the most rigorous among the other cities: Courts reserve notorious public injustices toward Blacks; many attacks on private properties and Black churches go unpunished; and the White political figures refuse to negotiate in good faith.

            We have got to set up a direct action plan to pressure for a just negotiation.  We discovered that we never obtained a single civil right if not after resolute pressures, legal, and non-violent. Privilege classes never cede their prerogatives without constant constraints since groups lack individual morale values.

            For years, we have been hearing “Wait”; this “Wait” means “Never” to my ears.  When 20 million Blacks suffocate in fetid poverty within opulent society; when you walk quietly the street and not knowing when injustice will hit you next; when you fight the devastating feeling of being considered as nobody, then you comprehend that it is no longer appropriate to wait.  I am convinced that if the non-violence dimension was not prevalent in Black churches then blood would be flowing on the streets in the south.  The ultimate weakness of violence is a descending spiral that generates the destruction of what it seeked to destroy.  Instead of weakening evil it multiplies it.  Violence may kill the liar but it neither kills the lie nor re-establishing truth” (Letters from the prison of Birmingham, 1963)

            A mass non-violent demonstration flooded the streets of Birmingham in 1963; it was squashed violently.  More than 3,000 Black demonstrators were put in jail; King was among them.  Martin Luther King was jailed 20 times for various durations; the prison term in Birmingham lasted 140 days.

            Dr. Martin Luther King (1929-68) was born in the State of Georgia, a grandson and son of a preacher; he didn’t suffer or experience the miseries of the southern Blacks; he wrote his PhD thesis at the seminary of Crozer in Pennsylvania “Comparison of the concept of God between Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

            It happened that in 1955 another Black woman, Rosa Parks, defied the transport regulation of segregating passengers in Montgomery (Alabama); Parks refused to cede her place to a White passenger.  This time around, Blacks were ready to react.  King and another preacher demanded the boycott of the bus company. King said: “We are tired of maltreatments. We have been too patient so far. One of the glories of democracy is that people have the right to protest.  Our protest will be conducted non-violently.  Love of the neighbor is our rule.”

            The boycott lasted 382 days and the bus company changed its rules to avoid bankruptcy. The Supreme Court ruled that segregation in transport is not constitutional.  For 11 years, King traveled more than 10 million km, crisscrossed the USA and traveled to many countries and delivered over 2,500 public speeches. King fame spread overseas and inland; he delivered 208 public speeches in 1957 alone and was invited by Kwame Nkrumah to Accra to celebrate the newly acquired independence of Ghana.  President Eisenhower received King in private audience in 1957.  Pope Paul 6 received him in the Vatican in 1964, shortly before King was awarded Nobel Peace Prize.

            Dr. Martin Luther King was not conversant with the Black northern States problems: the segregation there was class segregation (ghetto life) of the worst kind.  Black leaders in the north and people in Harlem lambasted King’s approachs to their different problems.  Malcolm X understood King’s non-violence program but correctly comprehended that White authorities tactically viewed King’s movement as a lesser evil and favored it to the more radical movements demanding separate State for Blacks.  Malcolm X had this prophecy “Sure, my methods are radically opposed to King’s non-violence that has the merit of exposing the brutality of White racial system but in the current climate I am wondering which one of us will be assassinated first.”  Malcolm X was assassinated 4 years before King.  Like all activists, they didn’t reach the age of 40.  The White authorities decided that it was King’s turn to be assassinated when his non-violence movement lagged behind the radical movements.  

            Stokely Carmichael who instituted the Comity of non-violent students (SNCC) broke out with the “evangelical sweetness” of King and launched the order for “Black Power” against “institutional and structural racism”.  Fannie Lou Hamer pronounced during a congress for racial equality “While King is dreaming I am having nightmares”.  By 1965, King and Ralph Abernathy decided to relocate to the poor quarters in Chicago.  King’s non-violent movement was losing momentum to the radical Black movements. Abernathy could not sustain for long the rough life in the ghetto and moved out to breath easier.

            After the mass rally in Washington DC where 250,000 gathered to hear King saying: “I had a dream that, one day, the State of Mississippi, aflame in injustices and oppressions, is transformed into an oasis of liberty and justice.  I had a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of ancient slaves and the sons of ancient owners of slaves will sit down together at the table of fraternity” the non-violence movement lost momentum because nothing major moved in civil rights demands as during the Kennedy Administration.

            The moment King was assassinated in 1968, 150 cities throughout the USA were set ablaze.  The Federal government and all the States guards ordered tens of thousands of soldiers to tame the mass revolts. The revolts registered 46 killed, 3,000 injured, 2,000 buildings burned, and 23,000 arrests.

            Dr. Martin Luther King published “Combats for liberty, 1958”, “Non-violent revolutions”, “The power of love, 1963”, “where from here? 1967” and “Why we can’t wait? 1964”

“Next time, fire it is”; (Feb 28, 2010)

 “It is impossible that past humiliation of Blacks comes back to crush us all.  Blacks will refuse to go to war abroad: How many blacks could the White government locks up in jails for disobedience? The US will be incapable of building a better world, here or elsewhere, if White/Black relation is not improved. The West is still unable to differentiate between the human and the politics in discrimination: The West refuses to accept the slaves brought in chains as valid citizens.
 

We have got to do what is necessary at the price of expulsion, emprisonment, torture, and death. We have got to do what is necessary so that the next generation of blacks pay the least of the bill for human dignity and political civil rights. The impossible is the least we should demand.
 We are beautiful’ when I was a kid I wondered “when vengence is consumated then what would become of all that beauty?” There is a law that says “What goes up must come down”: Whites have reached the top of the curve in ignorance and intransigence. The few of the conscious Blacks have to stand up and fire in order to end this racial nightmare; they have to press for real united nation”

 James Arthur Baldwin (1924-87) settled in France and died in France.  He published “The Conversion, 1953” and “The room of Giovanni” where he proclaimed his homosexual inclinations.  Baldwin participated in the first Black Congress in Paris (1956) and met black intellectuals and artists from around the world. He travelled in Europe and Africa and used to return to the US to participate in critical demonstrations and mass ralies.
 Baldwin demanded of Senator Robert Kennedy to convince his brother President John to carry a balck kid to the south and register him in white school since the US High  Court has recognized this right in 1954.  When Kennedy refused then Baldwin replied: “Nest time, fire it is”  Indeed, the 60’s was plagued by a succession of political assassinations starting by John Kennedy, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy and many other black leaders.

Should Palestinian Hamas Recognize Israel?  (March 12, 2009)

 

            Hamas and the Palestinian Resistance forces could recognize a secular, democratic, and liberal Israel. The major roadblock is that the UN Charters prohibit the Palestinians to recognize apartheid, racist, and theocratic State.  Either the UN changes it charters to appreciating apartheid, racist, and theocratic systems or it has to pressure the USA and Europe to consistently “encourage” Israel to change. When Israel is willing to pass a resolution by its Parliament that the Zionist State relinquishes its ideology of apartheid, racism, and theocratic Jewish States based on the Judaic religious laws then Israel has to courageously behave and act accordingly. The Palestinians want proof that Israel is behaving as a civil society in concordance with World expectation for modern States.

            The World Community wants Israel to tear down the “Wall of Shame”, to remove the hundreds of “roadblocks of humiliations”, to stop the implantations of colonies in illegal Palestinian lands, to abolish the colonial British laws of detention without legal proceedings, and to seriously crack down on the hooliganism of the colonists.

Obviously, the Palestinians would also relinquish a system based on theocratic Moslem State based on religious laws.  In this case, the Palestinian State would be joining Syria, Yemen, Algeria, and Tunisia as non theocratic States in the Arab World.  Iraq was non theocratic until Bush Junior decided otherwise without the UN consent.  Lebanon is by its Constitution a non theocratic State but is governed and structured as a multiple theocratic State with 19 recognized religious sects regulating the private lives of the Lebanese from birth to death.

            The Palestinians and their resistances have not been fighting for 70 years and sacrificing hundreds of thousands of martyrs, and suffering ignominy and unlimited forms of humiliations and hardship to just safeguard their rights of return to their usurped lands; the Palestinians have been steadfast to establish a State that would not be constantly threatened by an apartheid, racist, expansionist, and theocratic neighboring Jewish State.

            Arafat and his Fateh faction have offered Israel a fundamental freebee. They recognized a Sate that never relinquished its system of apartheid, racism, and theocratic fundamentals.  Fair negotiation is based on similar principles.  The Palestinians are not to be pressured to accept ideologies and practices that are contrary to their survival as a State while Israel can enjoy the vetoes and blessings of the USA and Europe for whatever it does of crimes against humanity.

 

The Palestinians and the free men around the world have already recognized Israel as the land of apartheid, racism, genocide, humiliation, and crimes committed against humanity.  If the USA and Europe want a different kind of recognition toward Israel then it is up to them to pressure this Zionist State to prove to the world and to itself that it had learned the lesson and would like the UN to recognize a new state according to its charters.

Bi-Weekly Report (#13) on the Middle East and Lebanon (March 1, 2009)

The US Administration has usurped President Obama authority and squandered his promises to fight racism and apartheid systems for a just and peaceful world. 

First, this US Administration has declined to join the world conference to fight racism and apartheid on the ground that Israel would be very displeased since the conference would discuss the Zionist State genocide activities in the Palestinian Gaza and the West Bank territories.  What the US Administration wants the world to comprehend is that any criticism of the Zionist State is invariably anti-Semitic.

Second, the policies of this administration are no different of the Bush Junior administration concerning the Middle East; this administration wants the world to understand that the mistakes of the previous administration were in matter of negotiation procedures and technicality. So far, this administration has refrained of any dialogue with Hamas and the Palestinian resistance factions who won in a democratically election.

Third, this administration is still resuming air strikes against civilians in Afghanistan and Pakistan, confirming the Bush Junior orders for accepting “collateral damage” strategy.

Fourth, the heavy funding of under performing private multinational institutions is resuming the same Bush Junior trend.

            Israel is trying to accommodate new realities.  When the US President Eisenhower checked Israel expansionist policies in the sixties the Zionist State adopted a containment strategy of the Arab States: it allied with Turkey, Iran, and Ethiopia.  Now that its former allies are no longer in the mood of alienating the Arab States for the sake of blue eyed Jewish Ashkenazi then Israel has attempted to divide the Arab States between the “Moderate” (Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Jordan, and Tunisia) and the Radical parties such as Syria, Hezbollah, and Palestinian Hamas.  Since when was the dark Wahhabi regime in Saudi Arabia been moderate? How can dictatorial regimes in Egypt, Jordan and Tunisia be considered moderate?

            Lebanon has always been the political barometer of the feud and animosities among the Arab States.  Each major Arab State funds a Lebanese party with the purpose of sending political messages by destabilizing our security and peaceful coexistence.  After the Dawha agreement Lebanon enjoyed a period of “entente” among the political leaders and then it is degrading again as Saudi Arabia and Egypt are trying to force the hands of Syria for taming Hezbollah and Hamas.  

            The allies to the Hariri clan want the Lebanese to believe that the opposition is scare shit of the scarecrow of the International Tribunal that might take 6 years of deliberation if funding is secured and that our bankrupt government is to bare 49% of the expenses, which means never. The majority of the Lebanese have known for many years that the mastermind behind the assassination of Rafic Hariri are the US, France, Saudi Arabia, and Israel.  In fact, these States are among the 10 states that refused to cooperate with the investigation in providing information and intelligence data!

            For the time being, the Lebanese have no public electricity, no ministry for planning and reforms, no productive economy, and no plans to absorb the thousands of expatriate Lebanese who lost their jobs and businesses abroad in this world recession.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

October 2020
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Blog Stats

  • 1,428,737 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 777 other followers

%d bloggers like this: