Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Reporters Without Borders

And what Morsi of Egypt SUPPORTERS do? They DELIBERATELY FIRE ON JOURNALISTS COVERING CLASHES

Note: Late Egypt president Mohamed Morsi died last week at 67 while in court. He supposedly was elected and lasted a single year before a military coup led by Sisi “deposed” him. Morsi had no official burying: just attended by his close family members. The State had declared a national curfew and emergency level. Morsi was mourned by the Muslim Brotherhood leaders such as Erdogan of Turkey, Qatar, Hamas Mich3al… Morsi’s wife died also the next day of heart failure: she was his close cousin too.

Reporters Without Borders strongly condemns the actions of President Mohamed Morsi’s supporters who deliberately fired on journalists and attacked them as they were covering last night’s clashes outside the presidential palace in Cairo.

Al-Hosseiny Abu Deif, an experienced newspaper reporter, was rushed to hospital after being hit in the head by a rubber bullet fired at close range at around 1 a.m. today and is said to be in a critical condition.

A witness told Reporters Without Borders that Morsi supporters deliberately targeted Deif, who works for the newspaper Al-Fagr.

Five minutes before Abu Deif was shot from a distance of just two metres, he showed colleagues photos of the president’s supporters with sophisticated weapons.

Abu Deif camera was stolen after he was shot, as colleagues went to his aid.

“Witnesses say the president’s supporters deliberately targeted and attacked journalists. We call on President Morsi to order an investigation into the circumstances of these attacks and to punish those responsible.

As president, he must ensure the safety of all of his fellow citizens, including journalists.

“We also call on the president to rescind the 22 November decree granting himself extraordinary powers, and not hold a referendum on the draft constitution in its current form.

The Constituent Commission must amend the draft in order to provide more protection for freedom of expression and information.”

Other journalists were injured during the night as they covered the clashes.They included :

Mohamed Azouz of the government newspaper Al-Gomhuria,

Osama Al-Shazly of the daily Al-Badil,

Islam Abdel Tawab of Al-Alam Al-Yawm,

Sahar Talaat, a correspondent for Radio France Internationale’s Spanish service and

Ahmed Khair Eldeen, a ON-TV journalist.

Two journalists with Turkey’s TRT television, reporter Mehmet Akif Ersoy and cameraman Adil Ahmet, were attacked earlier yesterday in Tahrir Square and their equipment was damaged.

Read the letter about the Egyptian constitution that was sent to President Morsi yesterday.

Note: Morsi was a strong supporter of Israel, as USA wanted him to be in order to be elected, a farcical election since actually he didn’t get the majority of the votes against his challenger of the former political system. Morsi was supported by Turkey and Qatar and he sided with the exclusion of Syria from the Arab Summits. Morsi was a bad omen for many countries.

Inspirational Women from Middle-East

1. Zaina Erhaim is a Syrian journalist who was living in London before she returned to Aleppo to risk her life under barrel bombs to cover the Syrian conflict. This year she won the Reporters Without Borders freedom prize.

The Paris-based media rights group singled out Erhaim for her “determination and courage” in covering the conflict in Syria, deemed to be the most dangerous country in the world for journalists.

“After living in horror for all these years, it is normal to feel abandoned and forget there is someone listening or reading our stories who actually cares,” Erhaim told RSF in August.

“Such initiatives make me feel that my Syrian colleagues and I do matter, and that our hard work is appreciated. It gives me power to go on in my daily surviving battle,” she added.

2. After Israeli settlers and the army stormed the al-Aqsa site in October a group of Palestinian women took it upon themselves to defend al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem.

The group of women, commonly referred to as Murabitat [“steadfast fighters”] were banned by Israel from Islam’s third holiest site.

“Many Muslims abandoned it, so the women decided to defend it,” Halawani, one of the women, told al-Araby al-Jadeed.

“Women became the primary defence line at al-Aqsa, which disturbed and intimidated the Israeli police,” she added.

“We are subjected to violence on a daily basis, be it verbal or physical. But suffering is nothing new to Palestinian women. We have always been wives, daughters, sisters or mothers of prisoners or martyrs. We suffer all the time.”

3. Mahienour al-Massry is an Egyptian human rights activist and lawyer and one of 51,000 political detainees imprisoned in Egypt.

“Not a single struggle was off limits to Mahienour: human rights, student rights, women’s rights, labour strikes, legal aid, anti-police brutality, housing for the poor, corruption, anti-military trials, heritage preservation, right to public space, state-led land reclamation from the poor, climate change, street children’s rights, Syrian refugees; the list goes on,” wrote Egyptian academic Amro Ali.

“Mahienour would rush to defend victim’s rights—regardless of their affiliation—and she attended the funerals of people she had never met. Her presence sent a message that an issue really mattered and raised protestors’ morale.”

Other prominent female activists released from Egyptian prisons this year include Sanaa Seif, Esraa al-Taweel and Yara Salam.

4. Nudem Durak is Kurdish folk singer and teacher who was imprisoned for ten years in Turkey for singing in her native language.
She was charged with promoting Kurdish propaganda.

“Singing in our mother tongue and passing the music down through the generations honours us,” she said in an interview to al-Jazeera plus, shortly before she was detained.

“I am in trouble for following my dreams,” she said.

Durak is from the town of Cizre near the Syria border where clashes between Kurds and Turkish security forces have escalated this year.

(A terrible year for the Kurds in this town, suffering consecutive security shut down and blockades. Erdogan ofr Turkey claimed that he killed 1,300 Kurds this year)

“You either go to the mountains and join the guerillas, or you go to prison,” she said. “I don’t think I will do either of them.”

5. Radhiya al-Mutwakkol

Radiya is a Yemeni human rights activist documenting atrocities on both sides of the Yemeni conflict that has claimed thousands of lives.

Her father, a politician and academic, was assassinated by unknown gunmen last year.  However, that has not deterred her from continuing to advocate for human rights in Yemen.

She is married to another human rights activist and founded Muwatana Organization for Human Rights.

Amidst the conflict, she also emphasizes the particular oppression that women have faced from the warring parties.

6. Zeina Daccache

Daccache is a Lebanese woman who sought to give a voice to those who have been excluded, marginalised and silenced in a divided society through drama therapy.

Working alongside female prisoners, they produced the play Scheherazade’s diary, and Daccache created a second documentary depicting daily life in prison and women’s place in Lebanese society.

This followed her successful documentary “12 Angry Lebanese“, concentrating on male prisoners.

“Nobody understood what I wanted to do… I think they thought I’d give up trying to get permission, and in the end, they were the ones who gave in,” Dannache said, commenting on the difficulties of gaining access to the prison.

She focused on issues such as rape, forced marriage, drugs, adultery, and murder. Her documentary looked at those things never spoken about by those who have experienced them.

Daccache later continued her initiative in Iraq.

7. Meherzia Labidi
Labidi is an Ennahdha MP and the first woman to hold the position of deputy speaker of parliament in Tunisia.  She has become known for running parliamentary sessions with a firm hand.

Before the revolution, Labidi lived in France and worked as a translator.

“I’m indebted to the revolution, the youth and the martyrs who scarified their lives for me to be able to return to Tunisia, after living in exile for many years,” Labidi said.

Since her return and involvement in political life, Labidi has taken time to speak to the people. Her conclusion is that they have found “a degree of freedom to voice their concerns, as the former regime had denied them the right to express themselves”.

“You cannot imagine the injustices they try to convey to me,” she said.

Last year she helped introduce a clause to protect women’s rights into the new Tunisian constitution and in 2015 lead the government’s committee for women, children and the elderly.

Labadi was one of many Tunisian women, of differing political and ideological backgrounds, who are prominent in the political life of the country.

8. Sara al-Drees

Sara al-Drees is a lauded Kuwaiti novelist and teacher who isn’t afraid to speak her mind.

This year she was issued with an arrest warrant for tweets insulting the prophet Mohammad.

Drees, commented in a tweet saying that she was returning to Kuwait and that she had done nothing wrong.

In 2013, a Kuwaiti appeal court upheld a 20-month prison sentence on Drees for posting political comments on Twitter.

She was described as Kuwait’s “first political detainee”.

9. Niloufar Ardalan

Ardalan, the captain of the Iranian national football team, missed the Asian Cup because her husband refused to let travel, which is allowed under Islamic laws enforced in Iran.

Later the same year her husband also refused her to go to the world championships in Guatamala.

Ardalan fought her case court, and the judge allowed her to go to the world championships.

One Student’s Epic Tweets Call Out the Biggest Hypocrites Marching for Free Speech In Paris

Millions of people took to the streets of Paris and cities across France on Sunday to rally in defense of free speech and against terrorism in the wake of Wednesday’s deadly attack on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo.

The French Interior Ministry told the Associated Press that 3.7 million marched throughout France, making the demonstrations the largest in the country’s history.

Adding to the symbolic weight of the demonstrations, more than 40 world leaders joined the start of the Paris march, linking arms in an act of solidarity. But as Reporters Without Borders points out, their policies at home are far from compatible with the solidarity for free speech on display throughout France. 

The organization said Sunday that it was “appalled by the presence of leaders from countries where journalists and bloggers are systematically persecuted such as Egypt (which is ranked 159th out of 180 countries in RWB’s press freedom index), Russia (148th), Turkey (154th) and United Arab Emirates (118th).”

“We must demonstrate our solidarity with Charlie Hebdo without forgetting all the world’s other Charlies,” Reporters Without Borders Secretary-General Christophe Deloire said in a statement.

“It would be unacceptable if representatives of countries that silence journalists were to take advantage of the current outpouring of emotion to try to improve their international image and then continue their repressive policies when they return home. We must not let predators of press freedom spit on the graves of Charlie Hebdo.”

They’re right.

In what can only be described as an epic series of 21 pointed tweets, London School for Economics Middle East Society co-president Daniel Wickham points out that many of the world leaders who marched Sunday through the streets of Paris are not the world’s biggest advocates for press freedom.

[<a href=”//storify.com/tometty/staunch-defenders-of-free-press-attend-solidarity” target=”_blank”>View the story “These ‘staunch defenders’ of the free press are attending today’s solidarity rally in Paris” on Storify</a>]<span id=”mce_marker” data-mce-type=”bookmark”></span&amp

 

“Politicians worldwide are enacting a slew of laws to impinge on free speech, but are the first to defend it when there’s a body count,” writes the Daily Beast‘s Luke O’Neil. “It is grandstanding for a right rarely protected unless under immediate attack.”

As journalists and human rights activists stand with Charlie Hebdo, they should remember that, across the world, not every journalist is Charlie.

Turkey is one of the harshest persecutor of journalists and its Prime minister participated in the march.

Israel assassinated 17 journalists in Gaza genocide war.

This sums it up:
– Prime Minister Rajoy of Spain, whose government just passed the Ley Mordaza, a gag law placing historic restrictions on the right to protest in Spain.
– Foreign Minister Lavrov of Russia, which last year jailed a journalist for “insulting a government servant” .
– Foreign Minister Shoukry of Egypt, which as well as Al Jazeera staff has detained journalist Shawkan for around 500 days.
– King Abdullah of Jordan, which last year sentenced a Palestinian journalistlist to 15 years in prison with hard labour.
– Prime Minister Davutoglu of Turkey, which imprisons more journalists than any other country in the world.
– Prime Minister Netanyahu of Israel, whose forced killed 17 journalists in Gaza last year (second highest after Syria).
– Foreign Minister Lamamra of Algeria, which has detained journalist Abdessami Abdelhai for 15 months without charges.
– The Foreign Minister of the United Arab Emirates, which in 2013 held a journalist incommunicado for a month on suspicion of MB links.
– Prime Minister Jomaa of Tunisia, which recently jailed blogger Yassine Ayan for 3 years for “defaming the army”.
– The Prime Ministers of Georgia and Bulgaria, both of whom have a record of attacking & beating journalists.
– The Attorney General of the US, where police in Ferguson have recently detained and assaulted Washington Post reporters.
– Prime Minister Samaras of Greece, where riot police beat & injured two journalists at a protest in June last year
– Secretary-General of NATO, who are yet to be held to account for deliberately bombing and killing 16 Serbian journalists in ’99.
– President Keita of Mali, where journalists are expelled for covering human rights abuses.
– The Foreign Minister of Bahrain, 2nd biggest jailer of journos in the world per capita (they also torture them).
– Sheikh Mohamed Ben Hamad Ben Khalifa Al Thani of Qatar, which jailed a man for 15 years for writing the Jasmine poem.
– Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas, who had several journalists jailed for insulting him in 2013.
– Prime Minister Cerar of Slovenia, which sentenced a blogger to six months in prison for “defamation” in 2013.
– Prime Minister Enda Kenny of Ireland, where “blasphemy” is considered a criminal offense.
– Prime Minister Kopacz of Poland, which raided a magazine to seize recordings embarrassing for the ruling party.
– Prime Minister Cameron of the UK, where authorities destroyed documents obtained by The Guardian and threatened prosecution.
– Prime Minister Orbán of Hungary, the autocrat of who Amnesty says has “put an end to the free press in Hungary.”

 

Are you sure there are no more journalists in Yemen?

“Foreign journalists, don’t make us feel like you are doing us a favor by being here.”

“Instead of deporting militants, our national security deported a journalist. What a shame” wrote Yemeni journalist Hani Al-Guneid on Facebook.
Similar sentiments were widely expressed by activists and writers on May 9th, when journalist Adam Baron was wrongfully expelled from Yemen without an explanation. Until today, messages continue to spread condemning this attack on freedom of expression and some even felt obligated to apologize on behalf of their non elected government.The reactions to his deportation have highlighted a number of interesting points. It exemplified the reality that race/nationality/or passport matters in today’s media.Three days prior to Adam’s deportation, journalist Saeed Thabit Saeed sent a letter of complaint to the minister of interior, which he then published on Facebook. In it, he accused passport control, and later national security, of maintaining and using the same “black list” that Saleh’s government previously used against journalists and activists.

Saeed explained that he is often interrogated or detained at the airport upon arrival or departure from Sana’a. His passport was confiscated that day, and after some phone calls he was finally able to enter his own country.

Saeed is not the first journalist to complain of such harassment. A number of local journalists have been targets of intimidation tactics, violence, imprisonment and abuse. According to a March 2014 report by Reporters without Borders,

“Two years after Abd Rab Mansour Hadi became president, the situation of freedom of information in Yemen continues to be very worrying, especially as regards violence against media personnel.”

While it is very important that Adam’s deportation made headline news, it is as important to speak out against the numerous attacks on local citizens.

The last two years witnessed numerous violations including:

1. the murder of two young innocent boys,

2. a military attack on a funeral service of members of the Southern Movement in a public school courtyard killing 15 people,

3. a one-year jail sentence and fine of 100,000 Yemeni Riyals imposed on journalist Majed Karout, and

4. continuation of patronage through the $11.3 million allocated to the Tribes’ Affairs Authority in the 2014 budget despite the rising poverty.

None of these events made the international community question the practices of the current government. Why does it take a western journalists’ unfortunate deportation to make others see that “there might be something undemocratic” about this internationally supported government?

The second observation regarding Adam’s deportation is that while journalists have thankfully continued to unite in support of their colleagues, some have unfortunately used it as an opportunity to market themselves.

After announcing Adam’s deportation on twitter, a journalist was quick to immediately mention that there’s now “only one foreign journalist” officially in Yemen. Her tweet, taken out of context, implied to many that she was the only one left to report in the land of chaos.

I’m not a stranger to the hardships of freelancing, as my husband was one for quite sometime, yet this is no excuse to use this inappropriate time to market oneself. In fact, if anyone had the right to over-hype the issue it was Adam, but he did not.

I will not go into the semantics of what defines “official” in the dictionary, and what defines “official” in Yemen. Yet, I will say that the documents needed for western journalists to operate in Yemen are the following:

WHO KNOWS? Journalists have come to Yemen in a number of different ways. Yes, technically it could help if you have a journalism visa, but most of the time it is irrelevant. In fact, Adam Baron was deported even though he was “officially” working in Yemen.

Today, there are other journalists “officially” working or have worked in Yemen with very different residency papers/work permits. Some have a press card from the ministry of informaiton without a journalist visa, some are on a journalist visa, and others with neither.

Even the ones here without a press card work with the full knowledge of the Yemeni government, and in fact, many were officially registered as journalists during the 10-month National Dialogue Conference.

In addition, they continue to be invited by government officials to attend “official” events. Even the journalists without proper documents have traveled all over the country, met and continue to meet with high level officials, and publish their work under their name.

This is obviously not an ideal way to operate, as the government could easily deport them using the excuse that they do not have a valid visa, which the government did in 2011 when it deported four western journalists.

Then again, the government can deport anyone with no excuse such as the case of Adam. For this reason and many others, members of civil society and journalists continue to demand media reform in Yemen.

A third reflection is that it was curious how stressing “foreign” journalist based in Yemen was very important to distinguish one’s self from “local” as if it is necessarily correlated to credibility.

Yes, there is category of media professionals known as foreign correspondents, but majority of Western reporters in Yemen are not staff reporters. They are freelancers and work exactly like the local freelancers.

And there are Western journalists with Yemeni origins who are often not included in either the “foreign” or “local” journalist categories.

Foreign analysts and journalists should continue to travel and write about different countries including Yemen, as it can help provide a fresh perspective on things. Yet, their analysis should not be taken as the only credible voice in a country of 24 million people!

It is not the nationality that makes a journalist, but rather knowledge of the country, language skills, objectivity and professionalism. Whether the person is a foreign or local journalist should not be the basis for judging whether someone is a credible source.

It is important to remember the following:

1. there are Yemeni journalists who report to international media, and

2. Yemenis, like any other people, can also be credible, can also be objective, and can also relay the truth.

Why are local journalists in the west credible enough to report their own news, while it is not the case in Yemen?

Finally, while it’s admirable that some journalists leave the luxuries of their homes to work in less comfortable societies, it is important to remember that this is entirely their choice, and they do get something in return.

What you may wonder?

Well, where else could a new freelancer meet the highest government officials only two weeks after their arrival? This of course helps boost their careers in addition to their reputation. Once someone lives in “dangerous” Yemen, he/she is automatically given the “brave” award.

So my dear journalist friends, with all due respect, I admire your passion and your hard work, but please don’t make us feel like you are doing us a favor by being here. Please give us the respect and spare us the brave altruistic hero persona. It is not a favor you are bestowing on us to be living here.

I realize some of my journalist friends might be upset with this post, but I am sure that those who know me well enough will know that my intention is merely to give another side to the hype of last week.

While the government may not be friendly towards journalists, Yemeni people are. In fact, in almost every travel article, book or website, the one constant characteristic about Yemen is the description about the hospitable and friendly people of the country.

Let us work together to show the world what Yemen is really about.

Turkey’s Corruption scandal? What kind of outrageous news is this?

Dozens of their journalists colleagues are in prison or on trial, thousands of faceless opponents hound them on Twitter, and phone calls from government officials warn them over their coverage – all hazards of the trade for Turkey’s journalists.

Government critics who refuse to be muzzled can find themselves sacked.

Others avoid trouble, such as the broadcaster screening a documentary on penguins last June while police sprayed thousands of demonstrators in Istanbul with tear gas.

DASHA AFANASIEVA published this Feb. 3, 2014 on Reuters:

Corruption scandal tests Turkey’s cowed media

What has erupted in the past few weeks, a probe into alleged corruption at the heart of Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan‘s government,  might seem like a gift to Turkey’s cowed and long-suffering press.

With a few exceptions, much of the press is in no position to capitalize on the scandal by taking a more robust line with the government.

The scandal has blown open a feud between Erdogan and the U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, (Fathallah-Gulan) a powerful former ally whose “Hizmet” (Service) movement has influence in the police and judiciary, as well as parts of the media, and whom Erdogan blames for orchestrating the graft probe to unseat him.

An anti-government protester holds a placard during a demonstration in Ankara in this June 4, 2013 file photo. REUTERS/Umit Bektas/Files

An anti-government protester holds a placard during a demonstration in Ankara in this June 4, 2013 file photo. CREDIT: REUTERS/UMIT BEKTAS/FILES

“Gulenist” newspapers such as Zaman and Bugun, previously loosely allied to Erdogan’s AK Party, have reported details of the allegations, from pictures of cash stuffed in shoe boxes to damaging phone recordings between businessmen and Erdogan’s associates, something almost unthinkable just a few months ago.

Pro-government newspapers like Sabah, Star and Yeni Safak have largely portrayed the corruption investigations as a plot against Erdogan.

In the middle is a mainstream media, largely owned by sprawling conglomerates with business ties to the state, which has been cautiously trying to find a more assertive new voice, although its ownership structures cast doubt over whether there can be real change.

“The graft probe is a new opportunity for Turkish journalism to push itself out of suffocation,” said Yavuz Baydar, one of Turkey’s most prominent journalists who launched Platform 24, a media monitoring website, on Monday.

“The question is whether major conglomerate-owned outlets such as Hurriyet and Milliyet will be able to rise up to the challenge,” he told Reuters. Milliyet declined to comment while the editor in chief of Hurriyet did not respond to emailed requests.

Baydar lost his job at Sabah, whose former owner Calik Holding is run by Erdogan’s son-in-law, after criticizing the police crackdown on anti-government protests last June.

Sabah was sold in December to Kalyon, a construction group with major government contracts, in a deal that typifies the ownership structures in Turkey’s media landscape.

At least a dozen newspapers and 10 TV stations are owned by conglomerates with energy, construction or mining interests, all sectors heavily dependent on government business.

“This has created a situation in which media outlets are used to promote the ownership group’s financial interests,” U.S.-based press watchdog Freedom House said in a report published on Monday.

“Members of the media and the government alike describe newspapers’ Ankara bureau chiefs as ‘lobbyists’ for their companies,” it said.

‘BETTER NOT UPSET SIR’

Erdogan has described the corruption investigation as an attempted “judicial coup“. He has reassigned prosecutors and judges and thousands of police officers.

That has brought the probe to a halt and prompted lawyers, despairing at what they view as a lack of transparent judicial process, to leak court documents to those parts of the press not favorable to the government.

But when news website T24 published an article about a parliamentary question from the opposition Republican People’s Party regarding claims of bribery in the sale of Sabah (Morning) and other media assets, it was told to take it down by the media regulator. Then on Monday the same regulator said it had sent the warning by mistake.

“We’re just trying to provide something different from the ‘government newspapers’ that publish the AK Party line that this is a coup d’etat,” said Erhan Basyurt, Bugun’s editor-in-chief.

The paper’s circulation went up to 165,000 from 140,000 in the month after the corruption probe broke.

Other newspapers have had to be more cautious.

A senior editor at one of Turkey’s largest dailies, who did not want to be named and fears for his job after his boss was told to fire him, said he had been the subject of a hate campaign on the Internet and in pro-government newspapers.

He was followed and threatened, his car-license plate at one point published online, he said.

Sometimes he did not put bylines on stories to protect reporters. He also might soften the headline or put material damaging to Erdogan lower down in stories.

Restrictions on press freedom and attacks on journalists are nothing new in Turkey.

Commemorations of the 2007 murder of Armenian-Turkish journalist Hrant Dink, widely viewed as a political assassination, still draw tens of thousands each year.

But the taboos have changed.

Where once criticism of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the revered founder of the modern secular republic, or portraying Kurdish militants as anything other than “terrorists” might have resulted in a jail sentence for “insulting Turkish identity,” now it is criticism of the government which is problematic.

Editors and reporters said they had received phone calls from officials close to the prime minister asking them to change their coverage or dismiss journalists for critical stories.

“The voice on the end of the line says, ‘Beyefendi rahatsız olmasın,’ which can be translated as ‘Better not upset sir’,” said prominent author and columnist Ece Temelkuran, fired from the Haberturk newspaper after a series of such warnings for her coverage of a Turkish air strike which killed Kurdish civilians.

“The use of the word ‘sir’, ‘beyefendi’ makes your realize straight away what you are dealing with,” she said.

Government and AK Party officials declined to comment.

POLARISED

Turkey is the world’s leading jailer of journalists, with 40 in prison as of December, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. Reporters Without Borders‘ press freedom index ranks Turkey 154th out of 178.

The government says no journalist is being held or tried for their work.

“They are facing situations like these solely because they have got mixed up in other activities,” a senior government official, who did not want to be names, told Reuters.

But government influence, such as the indirect sackings and threat of loss of business for parent companies, which poses the main threat to press freedom, journalists and rights groups say.

“The government seems to have acquired the habit of shooting the messenger whenever it is in trouble. Journalists should not have to suffer because of high-level administrative in-fighting,” Reporters Without Borders said in a December report.

These criticisms come ahead of local elections in March, a presidential race in August and parliamentary polls next year.

Opposition candidates complain that Erdogan’s frequent speeches are broadcast live and in full by a slew of television stations, a degree of coverage his opponents do not enjoy.

One of the most pernicious effects of the widespread firings of reporters and editors from the ‘mainstream’ media is that there are fewer moderate voices to be heard,”  Freedom House said in its report.

(Additional reporting by Orhan Coskun and Gulsen Solaker in Ankara; Reporting by Dasha Afanasieva; Editing by Alexandra HudsonNick Tattersall and Giles Elgood)

Note 1: Turkish Cultural expansion in Central Asia https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2010/05/14/a-turkish-cultural-movement-fathallah-gulan/

Note 2: How many terms a President or Prime Minister has to serve before turning a dictator or an oligarch? Is Putin of Russia any better?

The US Constitution didn’t mention any restriction on the number of times a President can be candidate. Luckily, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson refused a third tenure on account of facing great difficulties during their second term. Only Franklin Roosevelt served 4 terms because of the WWII and couldn’t finish it.

The Constitution was amended to only two terms since then.

Morsi of Egypt has to deliver on his promise: “If the people gather in Tahrir Square as during Mubarak, I will certainly step down…”

The people in Egypt have been setting their tents for 2 weeks now in Tahrir Square, demanding that Morsi steps down. Why Morsi is still hanging on to his seat?

Already there are a dozen killed and over 200 injured, and perpetrated by Morsi’s hooligans of the Moslem Brotherhood movement. Why Morsi refuses to deliver on his promise?

The police forces have arrested 32 of the MB hooligans carrying molotov bottles and sharp weapons on their raids against the demonstrators. What Morsi is waiting for?

And what Morsi of Egypt SUPPORTERS do? They DELIBERATELY FIRE ON JOURNALISTS COVERING CLASHES

Reporters Without Borders strongly condemns the actions of President Mohamed Morsi’s supporters who deliberately fired on journalists and attacked them as they were covering last night’s clashes outside the presidential palace in Cairo.

Al-Hosseiny Abu Deif, an experienced newspaper reporter, was rushed to hospital after being hit in the head by a rubber bullet fired at close range at around 1 a.m. today and is said to be in a critical condition.

A witness told Reporters Without Borders that Morsi supporters deliberately targeted Deif, who works for the newspaper Al-Fagr.

Five minutes before Abu Deif was shot from a distance of just two metres, he showed colleagues photos of the president’s supporters with sophisticated weapons.

Abu Deif camera was stolen after he was shot, as colleagues went to his aid.

“Witnesses say the president’s supporters deliberately targeted and attacked journalists. We call on President Morsi to order an investigation into the circumstances of these attacks and to punish those responsible. As president, he must ensure the safety of all of his fellow citizens, including journalists.

“We also call on the president to rescind the 22 November decree granting himself extraordinary powers, and not hold a referendum on the draft constitution in its current form.

The Constituent Commission must amend the draft in order to provide more protection for freedom of expression and information.”

Other journalists were injured during the night as they covered the clashes.They included :

Mohamed Azouz of the government newspaper Al-Gomhuria,

Osama Al-Shazly of the daily Al-Badil,

Islam Abdel Tawab of Al-Alam Al-Yawm,

Sahar Talaat, a correspondent for Radio France Internationale’s Spanish service and

Ahmed Khair Eldeen, a ON-TV journalist.

Two journalists with Turkey’s TRT television, reporter Mehmet Akif Ersoy and cameraman Adil Ahmet, were attacked earlier yesterday in Tahrir Square and their equipment was damaged.

Read the letter about the Egyptian constitution that was sent to President Morsi yesterday.

The people in Egypt have declared with no uncertain terms: “This MB Constitution will not pass…”. Why Morsi insist on a this charade of a referendum on this Constitution that was cooked within one night and one day without the participation of the other political parties?

Morsi should remember that Egypt had a secular constitution and secular civil laws a century ago. Why Morsi feel so strongly about reverting Egypt to the medieval age?


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

October 2020
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