Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Rosa Parks

 

Why women are not in any dollar bill?

Why scientific achievements do not replace male figures on dollar bills?

Thinking forward: 2020 will mark the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.

Andrew Jackson’s portrait has held its place on the $20 bill since Jackson replaced Grover Cleveland in 1928.

For the organizers of Women on $20s, that’s quite long enough. “A woman’s place is on the money,” the Women on $20s campaign says. The new group has come up with a list of 15 women it would like to see on the $20 bill instead, including Rosa Parks, Eleanor Roosevelt and Harriet Tubman.

Abby Ohlheiser posted this March 3, 2015 

This group wants to banish Andrew Jackson from the $20 bill

Campaign organizers are targeting the 20 because 2020 will mark the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.

But there’s another reason: Jackson’s authorization and enforcement of the Indian Removal Act of 1830 — which forced several Native American tribes to give up their land to white farmers and move to Oklahoma — makes his continued presence on American currency controversial.

Slate pitched the idea of doing away with the seventh U.S. president’s face on the $20 bill last year, writing: “Andrew Jackson engineered a genocide. He shouldn’t be on our currency.”

Jackson, Women on $20s executive director Susan Ades Stone said in a phone interview, also hated paper currency anyway – much favoring gold and silver. “The guy would be rolling in his grave to know that every day the ATM spits out bills with his face on it,” he added.

The Women on $20s campaign aims to “literally raise the profile of a woman in a male-dominated field,” the nonprofit’s founder Barbara Ortiz Howard wrote on the site.

Right now, the only woman on a currently circulating piece of U.S. currency is Sacagawea, on the dollar coin.

The U.S. Mint lists two other coins depicting women: Helen Keller is on the reverse side of the 2003 Alabama quarter, and Susan B. Anthony was on the dollar coin until 1981.

(That’s a great start)

Organizers are asking visitors to vote for one of 15 women they’ve selected as possible candidates to replace Jackson in a survey that is also doubling as a petition. The group hopes to collect enough signatures – about 100,000 – to justify sending a petition to the White House on the issue, asking the president to recommend the change to the Treasury. Stone said that the group collected about 8,000 votes in the past 60 hours.

“The goal is to get it done, but it’s not only about that. It’s about raising awareness and making sure people get to know these women,” Stone added. The group envisions the campaign lasting through March, which is Women’s History Month.

But, Stone added, “If President Obama says tomorrow that he wants to do this, we’re not gonna say no.”

Although the new campaign still seems a longshot, a similar petition also prompted Britain to announce in 2013 that it would put Jane Austen on the 10-pound note.

As Buzzfeed’s write-up notes, Obama has generally supported the idea of putting a woman on currency. “Last week, a young girl wrote to ask me why aren’t there any women on our currency,” the president said in a July speech in Kansas City.

“And then she gave me like a long list of possible women to put on our dollar bills and quarters and stuff — which I thought was a pretty good idea.”

The organization whittled down a list of finalists based on two main criteria – the individual’s impact on society, and the difficulty they faced in doing so, Stone said.

Here are the 15 choices of Women on $20s, which Stone hopes will, as a group, “tell a great American story of women not only helping other women but helping to improve the lives of all Americans despite facing enormous obstacles along the way:”

  • Clara Barton‎, the founder of the American Red Cross
  • Margaret Sanger‎, who opened the first birth control clinic in the US.
  • Rachel Carson‎, a marine biologist who wrote the hugely influential environmental book Silent Spring
  • Rosa Parks‎, the iconic civil rights activist
  • Harriet Tubman‎, the abolitionist activist famed for her journeys on the underground railroad
  • Barbara Jordan‎, a politician who was the first black woman in the south to be elected to the House of Representatives
  • Betty Friedan‎, feminist author of the Feminine Mystique 
  • Frances Perkins‎, the Secretary of Labor under FDR, who was the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet
  • Susan B. Anthony‎, women’s suffrage movement leader
  • Shirley Chisholm‎, the first African-American woman elected to Congress
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton‎, early women’s rights activist and abolitionist
  • Eleanor Roosevelt‎, human rights activist and former first Lady
  • Sojourner Truth‎, African American women’s rights activist and abolitionist
  • Alice Paul‎, women’s suffrage movement leader

At least one of those choices is already rather controversial, as noted by Breitbart, whose headline about the campaign reads:

“NEW GROUP WANTS TO PUT PLANNED PARENTHOOD FOUNDER MARGARET SANGER ON THE $20 BILL.”

Note: Every US President tried to chase out the native Indians. Jackson was better than many President in his achievement and standing out against the Rothschild financial enslavement of the US treasury and printing of the dollar.

“While King is having his sweet dreams I’ve been having nightmares”

            Dr. Martin Luther King delivered his famous speech “I had a dream” in front of a monster demonstration of 250, 000 people in Washington DC in 1964.  King was saying: “I had a dream that, one day, the State of Mississippi, aflame in injustices and oppressions, is transformed into an oasis of liberty and justice.  I had a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of ancient slaves and the sons of ancient owners of slaves will sit down together at the table of fraternity”

            It turned out that the expectations of the non-violence movement to reaping quick civil rights demands faltered with the Johnson’s administration; the movement lost momentum and the radical Black movements took over. Fannie Lou Hamer pronounced during a congress for racial equality “While King is dreaming I am having nightmares”.        

            In 1963, while in prison in Birmingham (Alabama) King received a letter from White preachers in Alabama considering Martin Luther King activities “unconsidered and tempestuous”. King responded with a letter:

            “Any non-violent campaign has to satisfy four stages: first, gather facts of injustices; second, start negotiation; third, endeavor auto-purification; and fourth, set up a program for direct action.  Birmingham is a city where segregation is the most rigorous among the other cities: Courts reserve notorious public injustices toward Blacks; many attacks on private properties and Black churches go unpunished; and the White political figures refuse to negotiate in good faith.

            We have got to set up a direct action plan to pressure for a just negotiation.  We discovered that we never obtained a single civil right if not after resolute pressures, legal, and non-violent. Privilege classes never cede their prerogatives without constant constraints since groups lack individual morale values.

            For years, we have been hearing “Wait”; this “Wait” means “Never” to my ears.  When 20 million Blacks suffocate in fetid poverty within opulent society; when you walk quietly the street and not knowing when injustice will hit you next; when you fight the devastating feeling of being considered as nobody, then you comprehend that it is no longer appropriate to wait.  I am convinced that if the non-violence dimension was not prevalent in Black churches then blood would be flowing on the streets in the south.  The ultimate weakness of violence is a descending spiral that generates the destruction of what it seeks to destroy.  Instead of weakening evil it multiplies it.  Violence may kill the liar but it neither kills the lie nor re-establishing truth” (Letters from the prison of Birmingham, 1963)

            A mass non-violent demonstration flooded the streets of Birmingham in 1963; it was squashed violently.  More than 3,000 Black demonstrators were put in jail; King was among them.  Martin Luther King was jailed 20 times for various durations; the prison term in Birmingham lasted 140 days.

            Dr. Martin Luther King (1929-68) was born in the State of Georgia, a grandson and son of a preacher; he didn’t suffer or experience the miseries of the southern Blacks; he wrote his PhD thesis at the seminary Crozer in Pennsylvania “Comparison of the concept of God between Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

            It happened that in 1955 another Black woman, Rosa Parks, defied the transport regulation of segregating passengers in Montgomery (Alabama); Parks refused to cede her place to a White passenger.  This time around, Blacks were ready to react.  King and another preacher demanded the boycott of the bus company. King said: “We are tired of maltreatments. We have been too patient so far. One of the glories of democracy is that people have the right to protest.  Our protest will be conducted non-violently.  Love of the neighbor is our rule.”

            The boycott lasted 382 days and the bus company changed its rules to avoid bankruptcy. The Supreme Court ruled that segregation in transport is not constitutional.  For 11 years, King traveled more than 10 million km, crisscrossed the USA and traveled to many countries and delivered over 2,500 public speeches. King fame spread overseas and inland; he delivered 208 public speeches in 1957 alone and was invited by Kwame Nkrumah to Accra to celebrate the newly acquired independence of Ghana.  President Eisenhower received King in private audience in 1957.  Pope Paul 6 received him in the Vatican in 1964, shortly before King was awarded Nobel Peace Prize.

            Dr. Martin Luther King was not conversant with the Black northern States problems: the segregation there was class segregation (ghetto life) of the worst kind.  Black leaders in the north and people in Harlem lambasted King’s approaches to their different problems.  Malcolm X understood King’s non-violence program but correctly comprehended that White authorities tactically viewed King’s movement as a lesser evil and favored it to the more radical movements demanding separate State for Blacks.  Malcolm X had this prophecy “Sure, my methods are radically opposed to King’s non-violence that has the merit of exposing the brutality of White racial system but in the current climate I am wondering which one of us will be assassinated first.” 

            Malcolm X was assassinated 4 years before King.  Like all activists, they didn’t reach the age of 40.  The White authorities decided that it was King’s turn to be assassinated when his non-violence movement lagged behind the radical movements.   Stokely Carmichael who instituted the Comity of non-violent students (SNCC) broke out with the “evangelical sweetness” of King and launched the order for “Black Power” against “institutional and structural racism.  By 1965, King and Ralph Abernathy decided to relocate to the poor quarters in Chicago.  King’s non-violent movement was losing momentum to the radical Black movements. Abernathy could not sustain for long the rough life in the ghetto and moved out to breath easier.

            The moment King was assassinated in 1968, 150 cities throughout the USA were set ablaze.  The Federal government and all the States guards ordered tens of thousands of soldiers to tame the mass revolts. The revolts registered 46 killed, 3,000 injured, 2,000 buildings burned, and 23,000 arrests.  Dr. Martin Luther King published “Combats for liberty, 1958”, “Non-violent revolutions”, “The power of love, 1963”, “where from here? 1967” and “Why we can’t wait? 1964”

“Wait sounds Never to my ears”; (Mar. 2, 2010)

            Responding to a letter from White preachers in Alabama considering Martin Luther King activities “unconsidered and tempestuous” he wrote from his prison in Birmingham in 1963 this letter:

            “Any non-violent campaign has to satisfy four stages: first, gather facts of injustices; second, start negotiation; third, endeavor auto-purification; and fourth, set up a program for direct action.  Birmingham is a city where segregation is the most rigorous among the other cities: Courts reserve notorious public injustices toward Blacks; many attacks on private properties and Black churches go unpunished; and the White political figures refuse to negotiate in good faith.

            We have got to set up a direct action plan to pressure for a just negotiation.  We discovered that we never obtained a single civil right if not after resolute pressures, legal, and non-violent. Privilege classes never cede their prerogatives without constant constraints since groups lack individual morale values.

            For years, we have been hearing “Wait”; this “Wait” means “Never” to my ears.  When 20 million Blacks suffocate in fetid poverty within opulent society; when you walk quietly the street and not knowing when injustice will hit you next; when you fight the devastating feeling of being considered as nobody, then you comprehend that it is no longer appropriate to wait.  I am convinced that if the non-violence dimension was not prevalent in Black churches then blood would be flowing on the streets in the south.  The ultimate weakness of violence is a descending spiral that generates the destruction of what it seeked to destroy.  Instead of weakening evil it multiplies it.  Violence may kill the liar but it neither kills the lie nor re-establishing truth” (Letters from the prison of Birmingham, 1963)

            A mass non-violent demonstration flooded the streets of Birmingham in 1963; it was squashed violently.  More than 3,000 Black demonstrators were put in jail; King was among them.  Martin Luther King was jailed 20 times for various durations; the prison term in Birmingham lasted 140 days.

            Dr. Martin Luther King (1929-68) was born in the State of Georgia, a grandson and son of a preacher; he didn’t suffer or experience the miseries of the southern Blacks; he wrote his PhD thesis at the seminary of Crozer in Pennsylvania “Comparison of the concept of God between Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

            It happened that in 1955 another Black woman, Rosa Parks, defied the transport regulation of segregating passengers in Montgomery (Alabama); Parks refused to cede her place to a White passenger.  This time around, Blacks were ready to react.  King and another preacher demanded the boycott of the bus company. King said: “We are tired of maltreatments. We have been too patient so far. One of the glories of democracy is that people have the right to protest.  Our protest will be conducted non-violently.  Love of the neighbor is our rule.”

            The boycott lasted 382 days and the bus company changed its rules to avoid bankruptcy. The Supreme Court ruled that segregation in transport is not constitutional.  For 11 years, King traveled more than 10 million km, crisscrossed the USA and traveled to many countries and delivered over 2,500 public speeches. King fame spread overseas and inland; he delivered 208 public speeches in 1957 alone and was invited by Kwame Nkrumah to Accra to celebrate the newly acquired independence of Ghana.  President Eisenhower received King in private audience in 1957.  Pope Paul 6 received him in the Vatican in 1964, shortly before King was awarded Nobel Peace Prize.

            Dr. Martin Luther King was not conversant with the Black northern States problems: the segregation there was class segregation (ghetto life) of the worst kind.  Black leaders in the north and people in Harlem lambasted King’s approachs to their different problems.  Malcolm X understood King’s non-violence program but correctly comprehended that White authorities tactically viewed King’s movement as a lesser evil and favored it to the more radical movements demanding separate State for Blacks.  Malcolm X had this prophecy “Sure, my methods are radically opposed to King’s non-violence that has the merit of exposing the brutality of White racial system but in the current climate I am wondering which one of us will be assassinated first.”  Malcolm X was assassinated 4 years before King.  Like all activists, they didn’t reach the age of 40.  The White authorities decided that it was King’s turn to be assassinated when his non-violence movement lagged behind the radical movements.  

            Stokely Carmichael who instituted the Comity of non-violent students (SNCC) broke out with the “evangelical sweetness” of King and launched the order for “Black Power” against “institutional and structural racism”.  Fannie Lou Hamer pronounced during a congress for racial equality “While King is dreaming I am having nightmares”.  By 1965, King and Ralph Abernathy decided to relocate to the poor quarters in Chicago.  King’s non-violent movement was losing momentum to the radical Black movements. Abernathy could not sustain for long the rough life in the ghetto and moved out to breath easier.

            After the mass rally in Washington DC where 250,000 gathered to hear King saying: “I had a dream that, one day, the State of Mississippi, aflame in injustices and oppressions, is transformed into an oasis of liberty and justice.  I had a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of ancient slaves and the sons of ancient owners of slaves will sit down together at the table of fraternity” the non-violence movement lost momentum because nothing major moved in civil rights demands as during the Kennedy Administration.

            The moment King was assassinated in 1968, 150 cities throughout the USA were set ablaze.  The Federal government and all the States guards ordered tens of thousands of soldiers to tame the mass revolts. The revolts registered 46 killed, 3,000 injured, 2,000 buildings burned, and 23,000 arrests.

            Dr. Martin Luther King published “Combats for liberty, 1958”, “Non-violent revolutions”, “The power of love, 1963”, “where from here? 1967” and “Why we can’t wait? 1964”


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adonis49

adonis49

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