Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘sanskrit language

Wrong interpretations for the living: Meaning of Nirvana and Samsara

Note: Re-edit of “Nirvana or Samsara: Wrong interpretations to living? September 27, 2010

In the Sanskrit language nirvana means a state of bliss or grace while samsara is a life of toiling and worries.

In the Arabic language (most probably a slang in the Aramaic language, and origin of the Sanskrit), samsara conveys the meaning of bargaining or negotiation

You may think of a middleman going back and forth with new proposals for the two parties to reach an agreement.

Maybe the Arabic language borrowed the term samsara from Sanskrit and gave it a practical meaning for their trading activities.

Is it not samsara our real life?

As we struggle to balance better internal spiritual state and better external conditions for our comfort and pleasure?

There is this Buddhist saying: “If you make a difference between nirvana and samsara then, you will remain in the samsara state“.

This saying means that there is No difference between nirvana and samsara.

But the second part of the sentence gives the connotation that samsara is actually a lower quality state of living.

It is common in languages to create opposite meaning to every word for rhetorical reason.  People tend to learn and assimilate the negative terminologies far better than the positive counterpart.

So what is good in a nirvana state or the highest quality of living?

Is a living liberated of wants, anguish, suffering, fear of death, and of illusions… better than striving, struggling for what you desire, and confronting difficulties?

Is keeping a state of bliss (salvation) worth total dissociation from the turmoil of living and avoiding potentially difficult situations (in order to retain the state of bliss)?

What is wrong with bargaining (tradeoff) endeavors for a better life?

Is living a state of grace and bliss a better state than struggling and challenging our potentials?

I can back the idea of training for more frequent and more durable moments of complete relaxation of the mind and body; but to staying in a nirvana state feels counterproductive to a rich and challenging life.

Maybe nirvana is not after all a long stay in a state of bliss or life after death could be the equivalent  meaning. Anyway, people are curious of the mysterious and exotic experiences and will try hard for a nirvana stage of relaxation.

Am I living to satisfying the never-ending moral constraints of “don’t do that?”

Am I a machine to figuring out what I can do?

If there is a kind of nobility abiding by social moral set of values then, am I not to be a happy nobleman too?

Actually, abiding by morale is a necessity when abiding by the ethics (that the ultimate virtue is learning to share the happiness of others) comes to be difficult to realizing.

If we were able during our tumultuous life to sharing and enjoying the pleasure and happiness of others then, there will be no need for any moral set of restrictions.

We are not told of that wisdom, or not that frequently, or it was never transpired to us by members of our family and community.

The community found it easier to nurture us by “don’t do that” instead of performing what is the secret of joy and happiness:  Mainly, learning to share and enjoy the pleasure and happiness of others:  That is the real meaning of solidarity.

Have you made it a habit distinguishing between hell and paradise? Between eternity and duration? Between the absolute and the relative? Between salvation and damnation? Between bliss and living in miseries?  What!

Are you trying to sound a sane person who can discriminate among good and bad tastes; true and false behaviors and sacrificing your life to pleasing others?

For how long are you intending to work on comprehending these differences?

All you need is awareness that infinity and eternity go hand in hand:  Everything is or converges to the present moment.

As long as you are making a difference between blissful moments and your current difficult moments then, you will never discover bliss.

Your life is the bliss, the grace, and paradise.

Cut down on your pains and suffering.

The time you saved in cutting down on unwanted conditions, then you need to invest it to appreciating and enjoying the power of the present moment.

The present moment is the real, the truth, and the eternal. 

All the opposite extremes are one in the present moment.

Note:  You are encouraged to read the follow-up article https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2010/09/25/second-truth-the-moment-is-eternal/

Nirvana or Samsara: Wrong interpretations to living?

In the Sanskrit language nirvana means a state of bliss or grace; samsara is a life of toiling and worries.

In the Arabic language, samsara conveys the meaning of bargaining; you may think of a middleman going back and forth with new proposals for the two parties to reaching an agreement.

Maybe the Arabic language borrowed the term samsara from Sanskrit and gave it a practical meaning for their trading activities.  Is it not samsara our real life? As we struggle to balance better internal spiritual state and better external conditions for our comfort and pleasure?

There is this Buddhist saying: “If you make a difference between nirvana and samsara then, you will remain in the samsara state“.

This saying means that there is no difference between nirvana and samsara; but the second part of the sentence gives the connotation that samsara is actually a lower quality state of living.

It is common in languages to create opposite meaning to every word for rhetorical reason.  People tend to learn and assimilate the negative terminologies far better than the positive counterpart.

So what is good in a nirvana state or the highest quality of living?

Is living liberated of wants, anguish, suffering, fear of death, and of illusions better than striving, struggling for what you desire, and confronting difficulties?   Is keeping a state of bliss (salvation) worth total dissociation from the turmoil of living and avoiding potentially difficult situations (in order to retaining the state of bliss)?

What is wrong with bargaining endeavors for a better life?  Is living a state of grace and bliss a better state than struggling and challenging our potentials?  I can back the idea of training for more frequent and more durable moments of complete relaxation of the mind and body; but to staying in a nirvana state feels counterproductive to a rich and challenging life. Maybe nirvana is not after all a long stay in a state of bliss or life after death could be the equivalent  meaning.  Anyway, people are curious of the mysterious and exotic experiences and will try hard for a nirvana stage of relaxation.

Am I living to satisfying the never-ending moral constraints of “don’t do that?”

Am I a machine to figuring out what I can do?

If there is a kind of nobility abiding by social moral set of values then, am I not to be a happy nobleman too?

Actually, abiding by morale is a necessity when abiding by the ethics (that the ultimate virtue is learning to share the happiness of others) comes to be difficult to realizing.  If we were able during our tumultuous life to sharing and enjoying the pleasure and happiness of others then, there will be no need for any moral set of restrictions.

We are not told of that wisdom, or not that frequently, or it was never transpired to us by members of our family and community.  The community found it easier to nurture us by “don’t do that” instead of performing what is the secret of joy and happiness:  Mainly, learning to share and enjoy the pleasure and happiness of others:  That is the real meaning of solidarity.

Have you made it a habit distinguishing between hell and paradise; between eternity and duration; between the absolute and the relative; between salvation and damnation; between bliss and living in miseries?  What!  Are you trying to sound a sane person who can discriminate among good and bad tastes; true and false behaviors and sacrificing your life to pleasing others?

For how long are you intending to work on comprehending these differences?  All you need is awareness that infinity and eternity go hand in hand:  Everything is or converges to the present moment.

As long as you are making a difference between blissful moments and your current difficult moments then, you will never discover bliss. Your life is the bliss, the grace, and paradise. Cut down on your pains and suffering.  The time you saved in cutting down on unwanted conditions you need to invest it to appreciating and enjoying the power of the present moment.

The present moment is the real, the truth, and the eternal. 

All the opposite extremes are one in the present moment.

Note:  You are encouraged to read the follow-up article https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2010/09/25/second-truth-the-moment-is-eternal/

What is this “Greater Syria Nation”? (December 3, 2008)

Syria, “Syrie”, or “Souria” is Su Rya in the Sanskrit language which means the “Land of the Sun“.

There are other names for Syria such as Suraqia (a combination of Syria and Iraq) or the Fertile Crescent.  The Arabic/Islamic occupation called it “Al Sham” or the land on the left side of Mecca or westward.

This potential nation is bordered from the East by the Zahgross and Bakhtiyari Mountain Chains (in present Iran and facing the Arab/Persian Gulf) that link with the Kurdistan Mountain Chains up north and the Taurus Mountain Chains in present Turkey to the Mediterranean Sea.

The south east merges with the western desert of the Arabian Peninsula; the south is bounded by the Arabian Sea; the south west by the Sinai Desert and the west by the Mediterranean Sea.

Thus, this potential nation included present States of Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan, part of west Iran, and part of south Turkey.

The Syriac or Aramaic language calls it Shu Riash, the Assyrian (Ashur) and the Ancient Testament of the Jews called this land Aram with qualifiers. For example, we have Aram of the two Rivers (Iraq), Aram Damascus, Aram Soba (Bekaa Valley in Lebanon), Aram Maakat (Hasbaya, Banyas in Lebanon), Aram Rahoub (Golan Heights in Syria).

Theoretically, “Greater Syria” has formidable delimited natural borders.

Practically, the topography of the inner land was wide open and there were no difficult barriers for any invader to move in with a large army.

Unfortunately for “Greater Syria” it was a most fertile land with mighty long rivers and multitudes of rich, skilled, and self contained City-States “merchant Republics” that were willing to pay the requisite tribute in order to be left in peace to resume their way of life and for accumulating more treasures.

The “Land of the Sun” has the sun shining most of the years and its ancient religion adored the Sun as the highest unique God (fundamentally monolithic) in the name of Eel or Enlil (Babylon) or Allah in the Arab Peninsula.

All the ancient Empires in that region adopted the same religion with slight variations.  Each religious sect had an assortment of minor Gods (males and females) with specialties and attributes such as Baal, Ashtarout (Astarte), Nabu, Hubal, and Lat and so on.

All the Empires in Persia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome adopted the same structure for their religions.

The specialized minor Gods overshadowed the generalist mightiest Unique God. 

Thus, each City-State was jealous of it minor God or totem on whom it lavished qualities of its main trade.

I think that is how caste systems were created: each City-State considered its self-autonomy as symbolic to its minor God or sect.  Trade exigencies were the only reasons for these City-States to communicate among one another or associate with for duration.

These City-States were “merchant republics” with democratic institutions within city limits; they were unable to unite or form any long lasting Empires against the invading warlike Empires coming from Persia, Egypt, Turkey, Greece, Rome, the Crusaders, and finally the European colonizers.

A few City-States confronted mighty Empires and sometimes managed to defend themselves victoriously like Sidon (Saida).  Many times the City-States burned themselves and their cities (again Sidon) and Cartage.  Tyr accepted that Alexander enters the sanctuary of Baal but refused him the permission to enter with his officers.

Syria was unified most of the time under foreign Empires of domination.

The first time that Syria enjoyed unity as a Nation was under the Seleucus dynasty (one of Alexander officers) with Capital in Antioch for barely 3 centuries.  It was a nation of compatible cultures with the Greek City-States mentality.

Even then, Syria was unable to institute a central army. That was the period when Hannibal was defeated in Zama (Tunisia/Cartage) by the Romans.

Cartage, the typical City-State of caste system and founded by Tyr, signed cooperation treaties with the Seleucus empire against their common enemy Rome, but the support failed to materialize when needed against Rome.  It was after his defeat that Hannibal fled to Syria; but it was too late to check mighty Rome militarily.

Before Islam, Syria was a prized region for frequent razzias by the Bedouin tribes, originating in the northern part of desert Arabic Peninsula.  Many of these Arabic tribes settled in Syria and a few converted to Christianity before Islam conquered Syria.

There were two other periods when Syria had a special nation status during the Arabic Omayyad dynasty and Saladin Al Ayyubi with Capital in Damascus.

Mostly, Syria was divided in small kingdoms or fiefdoms as extensions to City-States variations.  Thus, Syria is a mix of various nationalities and ethnic groups that have common cultures and language but never managed on its own volition to form a central government with a central army. 


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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