Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Sara Sibai

The Poetry of Creatures

Nath Halawani posted a review of a poetry evening at Dar Bistro in Beirut:

It’s one of those evenings that make me content with the choice I made over a year ago: to come back to Lebanon.

I had promised both poets I’d make them look like legends.

Matter of fact they didn’t need my help, they were there.

I already hold deep admiration to Sara Sibai‘s performance. (She got wed last year)

In fact I was just thinking of asking her later on to send me one of the poems she recited that night.

The idea got kicked out by the fact that a few lines won’t simply do, I’d need a video recording, better yet, I’d need to watch her performing live.

Sara Sibai

As for Omar, he shone like I’ve never seen a person shine before.

I’m known for my bluntness, my abstention to compliment people; Omar was truly energetic, whose light was reflected within the letters of every word he recited.

Omar BR

I felt a bit uncomfortable though, embarrassed with the noise my camera’s shutter kept making, such noise that broke the serenity of Dar Bistro.

The scene I was having pictured in mind needed to be caught on camera. I knew everyone would excuse me and understand.

Throughout the evening, both poets invited the audience for some contribution as well, and what contribution that was!

Last thing I expected was to witness the rogue dance of both emotions and reason in front of my eyes whenever a poem was screamed out loud.

The amount of sorrow, hatred, love and peace kept popping out dandling tenderly on the coffee tables

A few heads were looking up onto one direction, others were simply reaching out for an unseen world where the poem was taking place.

I hold but pure respect to both Sara and Omar, for their initiative replenished my faith in my choice and this tiny country, all drenched in chaos.

Three questions in the  Berlin-Artparasites

Sara Sibai shared berlin-artparasites‘s photo, July 24, 2015.
berlin-artparasites's photo.

My mother tells me
that when I meet someone I like,
I have to ask them three questions:

1. what are you afraid of?
2. do you like dogs?
3. what do you do when it rains?

Of those three, she says the first one is the most important.
“They gotta be scared of something, baby. Everybody is. If they aren’t afraid of anything, then they don’t believe in anything, either.”

I met you on a Sunday,

right after church.
one look and my heart fell

into my stomach like a trap door.

On our second date,
I asked you what you were afraid of.
“spiders, mostly. being alone. little children, like, the ones who just learned how to push a kid over on the playground. oh and space. holy shit, space.”
I asked you if you liked dogs.
I have three.”
I asked you what you do when it rains.
“sleep, mostly. sometimes I sit at the window and watch the rain droplets race. I make a shelter out of plastic in my backyard for all the stray animals; leave them food and a place to sleep.”

He smiled like he knew.
like his mom told him the same
thing.
“how about you?”

me?
I’m scared of everything.
of the hole in the o-zone layer,
of the lady next door who never
smiles at her dog,
and especially of all the secrets
the government must be breaking
it’s back trying to keep from us.
I love dogs so much, you have no idea.
I sleep when it rains.
I want to tell everyone I love them.
I want to find every stray animal and bring them home.
I want to wake up in your hair
and make you shitty coffee
and kiss your neck
and draw silly stick figures of us.
I never want to ask anyone else
these questions
ever again. ―Caitlyn Siehl

‪#‎TodaysConvo‬

artwork by Marion Fayolle

Do you feel dancing like mad, occasionally? Or reciting poetry?

Is there any connection for dancing hard and reciting poetry?

Are the two activities an urge to change, a liberation of a rotten situation that endured too long?

Are the two activities basically initiated by women?

Why do we dance?

Gillian Schutte posted:

Dance is used in protest in many parts of the world.

In South Africa, dance and song has always been intrinsic to protesting for human rights – and is often led by women.  Dance was considered the most performing rebellious/revolutionary act to display in front of the apartheid regime precisely because it said to them that no matter what they do they will never restrain the human spirit, the ability to dance and be.

Dance denotes a freedom of body, mind and soul.

It is both a celebratory and a rebellious act in that it speaks of a freedom of movement, a non-restricted relationship to body and is the … antithesis of an oppressed, restrained and violated body.

Dance is essentially non-patriarchal and it rebels against patriarchal control over the female body.

It is a misnomer to think of celebration as non-revolutionary. Celebration is the ultimate rebellious act in a world that is dictated to us by non-celebratory forces.

It is every women’s right to live in a celebratory world – one that celebrates her sexuality, her beauty, her wisdom, her body, her right to be orgasmic and free. To not recognize that urge is to remain in the clutches of the austere and patriarchal ethos.

To pooh pooh dance in protest also speaks of a western superiority as dance is used in protest in non-western culture naturally – why should we then not include it in a global movement?

Perhaps it is time for dissenters to consider what celebration and contemporary protest have in common, to wonder what such ritualized display of dissent may be able to do in a dynamic process of social change.

Dance, carnival and celebration has been used throughout history to destabilize restrictive leadership and government and it is destabilizing in that it cannot be contained or categorized as aggressive. This is not about women playing dance, it’s about revolution. You have the choice to rise, strike or dance.

Those who would like to dance should be free to do so!”

Why we are dancing:</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>"Dance is used in protest in many parts of the world. In South Africa for example, dance and song has always been intrinsic to protesting for human rights - and is often led by women.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Dance denotes a freedom of body, mind and soul. It is both a celebratory and rebellious act in that it speaks of a freedom of movement, a non-restricted relationship to body and is the<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
antithesis of an oppressed, restrained and violated body. It is essentially non-patriarchal and it rebels against patriarchal control over the female body.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>It is a misnomer to think of celebration as non-revolutionary. Celebration is the ultimate rebellious act in a world that is dictated to us by non-celebratory forces.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
In South Africa, again, dance was considered the most performative rebellious/revolutionary act to display in front of the apartheid regime precisely because it said to them that no matter what they do they will never restrain the human spirit, the ability to dance and be.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>It is every women's right to live in a celebratory world - one that celebrates her sexuality, her beauty, her wisdom, her body, her right to be orgasmic and free. To not recognise that is to remain in the clutches of the austere and patriarchal ethos. Furthermore to pooh pooh dance in protest also speaks of a western superiority as dance is used in protest in non-western culture naturally - why should we then not include it in a global movement?</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Perhaps it is time for dissenters to consider what celebration and contemporary protest have in common, to wonder what such ritualised display of dissent may be able to do in a dynamic process of social change. Dance, carnival and celebration has been used throughout history to destabilize restrictive leadership and government and it is destabilizing in that it cannot be contained or categorized as aggressive.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
This is not about women playing dance, it's about revolution.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>You have the choice to rise, strike or dance. Those who would like to dance should be free to do so!"</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>- Gillian Schutte

The Poetry of Creatures

A poetry reading in Lebanon.

Nath Halawani posted a review of a poetry evening at Dar Bistro:

It’s one of those evenings that make me content with the choice I made over a year ago: to come back to Lebanon.

I had promised both poets I’d make them look like legends.

Matter of fact they didn’t need my help, they were there. I already hold deep admiration to Sara Sibai’s performance.

In fact I was just thinking of asking her later on to send me one of the poems she recited that night.

The idea got kicked out by the fact that a few lines won’t simply do, I’d need a video recording, better yet, I’d need to watch her performing live.

Sara Sibai

As for Omar, he shone like I’ve never seen a person shine before.

I’m known for my bluntness, my abstention to compliment people; Omar was truly an energetic human, whose light was reflected within the letters of every word he recited.

Omar BR

I felt a bit uncomfortable though, embarrassed with the noise my camera’s shutter kept making, such noise that broke the serenity of Dar Bistro.

The scene I was having pictured in mind needed to be caught on camera. I knew everyone would excuse me and understand.

Throughout the evening, both poets invited the audience for some contribution as well, and what contribution that was!

Last thing I expected was to witness the rogue dance of both emotions and reason in front of my eyes whenever a poem was screamed out loud.

The amount of sorrow, hatred, love and peace kept popping out dandling tenderly on the coffee tables

A few heads were looking up onto one direction, others were simply reaching out for an unseen world where the poem was taking place.

I hold but pure respect to both Sara and Omar, for their initiative replenished my faith in my choice and this tiny country, all drenched in chaos.


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