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Posts Tagged ‘Steve Wozniak

Don’t waste it living someone else life: Steve Jobs

Note: I am updating older posts for the new followers. Somehow, these 6,700 articles need to be upgraded and updated. This post was published in 2011.

“Your time is limited”: Steve Jobs on TED

“Your time is limited: Don’t waste it living someone else life.

Your time is limited: Don’t be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people’s thinking.

Your time is limited: Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important,

Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become.

Everything else is secondary.”

This is a portion of Steve talk to TED (Technology, Education, and Development company that extend licenses for local and other country entrepreneurs to diffusing the talks of speakers (famous and less famous) registered twice a year at paid events).

I have read most of these inspiring slogans.  That Steve adopted them is great relief and a catalyst for the visionaries.

Users of Ipod and Iphone must be implicitly sending silent prayers to Steve in the coming weeks:  How many of us could dream of such a luxury?

If the natural parents of Steve (see biographical note) had decided to raise him, would Steve finish a university degree? Most probably, yes.  It is tradition for Near-East Mediterranean Sea families to see to it that their children graduate from universities.  Would Steve be a success story? Why not.  Would it be “this kind of success story”?

Did the adoptive family of Jobs done a good job? They let Steve try all kinds of electronic gadgets… Steve was so lucky: He managed to survive the critical first five years, be adopted, be fed adequately, be raised in the land of opportunities…

Streams of scientists, researchers, discoverers preceded Steve and set the foundation in digital communication and computing…

For how long Steve and his vision will last on front page? How long till it is relegated to virtual has been? Who is the next visionary to monopolize front page?

Someone wrote: “For us in Palo Alto, Steve Jobs was 15 minutes walk away…”  How many dared walk toward Steve’s direction?

Your time is limited.

Do you have a vision? Can you sustain pressure and enjoy working under pressure? If not, select another vision that requires as much work, but less stupid pressures that ruin your joy for life.

Do not worry, someone else will pick up your first vision and run with it: You have contributed to the implementation of the vision, given that you published in details your daydream project, regardless if many would deny you the essential contribution.

Work hard, not mindlessly, but mindlessly hard as you identified your strongest passions, which converge toward your dream of “What work makes me happiest?”

And the cycle closes in: Spirit, virtual vision, daydream detailed project, applied matters, trends, spirit…

Most people never cross the phase of attempting to publish their daydream project.  Why?  They don’t want to be humiliated by a few of the community pointing their fingers saying: “The fool. He can’t even earn a living…” We are surviving life!

Many blame Steve for not paying close attention to the sweatshop factories overseas, manufacturing the gadgets…

My nephew William told me that Steve was a super programmer: When Steve worked at Atari, he was paid $650 for every redundant ship he could remove from the design.  The design got so anorexic that the company paid Steve $5,000 bonus.  It turned out that Steve Wozniak was the one helping him out in Atari and Wozniak was the programmer for the first Apple computer. Any feedback?

Biographical Note: Steve was born in Feb. 24, 1955 from an American lady (Joanne Simpson) and the Syrian Abdul Fattah Jandaly.  They got married two years after Steve’s birth. In the mean time, the Jobs family had adopted Steve. In 1967, at age 12, Steve was admitted to a summer training with Hewlett-Packard: He called directly William Hewlett.

Steve graduated from Homestead high school (Cupertino) in 1972. He could not suffer university formal learning and worked with Atari (electronic games) from 1974 to 76.

In July 1976, Jobs and Steve Wozniak launched Apple 1, for $666.  Why this number 666?

Steve  married Loren Powell in 1991 and has three children.  The fourth child is from Chrissa Brennan. Steve died of cancer in the pancreas.

A few excerpts of Steve Jobs biography and comments

From the biography of Walter Isaacson. He claimed that Jobs refused to read any notes or a draft version. And this book is pretty thorough.

On June 29, 1975, Steve Wozniak typed a few characters on his invented machine (a keyboard, a screen, a monitor and a microprocessor) and letters were displayed.

Wozniak had spent 2 months hard working on the program.

This inspiration of creating a personal computer was the result of attending the Homebrew Computer Club that displayed the technical file of the Altair Kit microprocessor.

On January 24, 1984, Apple Computer launched the Macintosh. The motto was “You will understand why 1984 will Not be as 1984” (A reference to George Orwell book)

Ridley Scott (director of Blade Runner) shot the story-board of Lee Clow in London. The grey industrial complex was packed with skinheads listening to the speech of Big Brother. A blonde athlete woman (disk thrower) runs and smash the big screen the moment Big Brother (IBM)  is declaring “We are going to win”.

IBM PC had snatched the personal computer market.  By then, Steve Jobs had lost his fire as a renegade, a pirate: The Macintosh had a steep price ($2,500) with no external extensions. Computer geeks could Not add their own cards, functions, or even open the box.

After he was diagnosed with cancer, Jobs said at the graduation ceremony in Stanford, June 2005:  

“Remembering that I will die soon was the catalyst for taking the greatest of decisions of my life.
The waiting, pride, fear of failure and feeling embarrassed…all that vanished in the face of death
Remain what count

The best way Not to fall in the trap of believing that we have anything to lose
We are already naked.
Why Not start listening to your heart?”

If you hire a commercial PDG instead of a product designer, don’t be surprised for your enterprise to fail in the medium term.
If you sell your start ups, blame yourself for failing to build a perennial institution

(A closed, vertical integrated product of materials, programs and applications performs better for common users. Looks like many start-ups needed certain constraints to deliver on their products. For professionals and institutions, open systems suit better and enhance technology and start ups.)

the 21st century is the intersection of technology and Art designs.
After he was diagnosed with cancer and his son Rees got interested in DNA processes, Steve said:
The current century is the Intersection of technology and Biology

As he was getting ready to pass away, Jobs said:

“It is difficult to admit that all the experiences and wisdom we acquired can vanish at death.
At least, I like to believe that conscious survives
Most probably, life is like an off/on interrupter.
I never installed this kind of on/off alternatives on Apple products”
After the implant of a new liver, the nurse tried to install an oxygen mask for Jobs. He snatched it away while barely coming out of anesthesia, on the ground that it was Not aesthetically designed. He ordered to have 5 version submitted to him to select the best designed.

Lisa Brennan (Steve’s daughter from Chrisann) said of what Steve’s believed in:

1. Everything leads to its contrary

2. The best harvest are produced in arid soils

3. Pleasure is generated from privation

Tina Redse, the first love of Steve’s that lasted 5 passionate years and till the end of his life, described the character of Steve as emanating from the psychological syndrome ör pathology of  “Troubled narcissistic personality” that matched perfectly the behaviour of Steve’s, mainly a deficit in empathy

Steve connected with his biological mother after his adoptive mother passed away in 1986. He refused to meet with his biological father (originally from Syria)

The author Mona Simpson was his sister and they met and linked up and became great friends. She looked like him and was a red-headed person.

Daniel Kottke was one of the closest friends of Steve Job. He attended with him the Reed University for 2 years, joined him on his trip to India for a year, shared an apartment with him where Job’s girlfriend was pregnant, and worked with him in the garage developing Apple II.
Jobs refused to give him a single share when Apple went public on the ground that Kottke was just a technician.

Many wanted to give Kettke a few shares but Job was adamant: Zero shares.
Wozniac distributed 2,000 shares on 40 people in his team who were able to purchase their dream homes.
If Wozniak behaviors are considered naïve and ill-matured, then these labels must be common to most well-adjusted, caring and compassionate people.

A few quotes by Jobs:

1. If you want to develop a program, try to figure out the machines that will use it

2. The best way to predict the future is by inventing it

3. The good artist copies, the genius steal (from Picasso)

From Stewart Brand in Whole Earth Catalogue (1968):

“Free access to tools that permit private and individual power to tailor-make education, to find inspiration, model our environment and share our adventure with all who need them

The genius of Jobs (rip, mix, burn) was to transform the personal computer into a digital hub for all portable electronic gizmos, such as camcorders, iTunes, iPod, iPad…The computer served as a center for producing and generating videos, movies, clips…iMovie, iDVD, iTune…

Jobs also got totally engaged in the Cloud technology and succeeded in closing the loop.

Note 1: Bill Gates is Not an outlier: He is pretty much mainstream of the proper timing for new technology. Steve Jobs is an outlier: He could Not program but made all the nerds in electronics and programmers rally to his distorted reality

Note 2: There are plenty of geniuses in human history and in all kinds of disciplines.
Rare are those geniuses who could invent (intuition) and do the demonstration also.

One common traits among those rare geniuses is that they had to write down that they discovered and in two versions (Not the case of Jobs):
1. A version for their own benefit translating their mental processes for ease recollection when re-read, and
2. A version for publication to satisfy the rational processes for the period

I am thinking of Blaise Pascal, Galileo, Kepler, Lavoisier, Kamel Hassan Sabbah and scores of ancient Arab scientists who experimented before publishing their thesis

Note 3: And how would you “want to change the world” Sir?
Are more lunatics those who make apologies of the fools who claim their mission is to change the world
Like all those cult-like minds who want the world to behave according to their world views
What do you want to change Sir?
1. The standard of living all over the world?
2. Behavors of individuals?
3. The standard norms of communities?
4. Reforming system institutions to cater better to the common people requests?
5. Re-structuring the administrative institutions that are meant to control and rule the masses?
6. How about focusing first on your own community, and provide draft projects for its approval?
7. How about accepting the many idiosyncrasies surrounding you and your community?

Note 4: We have a structural problem to approach climate change.
You can simultaneously understand the medium to long-term risks of climate change and also come to the conclusion that it is in your short-term economic interest to invest in oil and gas.
Which is why anybody who tells you that the market is going to fix this on its own is lying to you.
But the government institutions are wary of changing this mid-fix of market stupid fixing of anything that drastic and existential

Note 5: Any man-made system must necessarily be fraught with errors, faults and limitations on its intended usage.
Any man-made system (product, service, administrative, management, political, control…) is doomed to fail when designed to cater for complex tasks and objectives: It will end up tying up many teams targeted for training, maintenance, redesigning, repairing…

Man-made designs barely consider the idiosyncrasies of users and the environment of the community and the designers lack the necessary knowledge, technically and the socio-psychological intricacies and interrelationship of the users and community.

The diversity of users and environments will easily pinpoint the deficiencies in any system.
The proper functioning of any system in the medium term relies solely on the acceptance of the idiosyncrasy of the community, regardless of the level of performance the system is delivering, particularly in health and safety usage and applications

Occupy Apple protesters: Who is Daisey? How does iPhone sucks?

Note 1: Information were extracted from two sources: The French weekly Corrier International  and the piece by Jason Farbman titled “The baddest Apple in a rotten bunch”

In the last 15 months, US artist Daisey has been touring the world describing how Apple product are being manufactured in Shenzhen (China, where half world’s electronic gadgets are produced for multinationals such as Sony, Nokia, Dell, Hewlett-Packard… and Apple).  Daisey’s latest conference was in Sydney Opera House titled “Steve Jobs, martyr and ecstasy”  Within two hours of the talk, you start wondering how detached we are from the reality, using tech gadgets sold at exorbitant prices, as workers in sweatshop factories earn a single dollar per hour, working 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, at the frenzied pace of assembling an expensive gadgets (iPhone, iPad, iPod…) in less than 7 seconds to keep up with the chain production quota.

The story began as Daisey visited the electronic production factory pretending to be an US business man. Workers were acting as robots. Consider the case of the 19-year-old Ma Xiangqian who committed suicide this January.  Ma Xiangqian had been working seven nights a week for 11 hours at a time “forging plastic and metal into electronic parts amid fumes and dust,” the Times reported.  After a run-in with a supervisor, Ma was demoted to cleaning toilets (read note 1). In the last month of his life, Ma worked 286 hours “including 112 hours of overtime, about three times the legal limit. Even with extra pay for overtime, he earned the equivalent of $1 an hour.”  At least 12 workers who make its products have committed suicide this year.

There are 400,000 other workers on two Foxconn campuses where Ma Xiangqian was driven to kill himself. They are unionized, but as Labor Notes reported, this is essentially meaningless. The head of the union is secretary to the Foxconn CEO.

Most of the workers had thrown themselves from the top of the tall dormitories where they are forced to live in during their few hours off. As of the end of May, Foxconn had begun to deal with the issue! Guess how?

Foxconn installed nets around the buildings to catch potential jumpers. And it began refusing to pay compensation to families of those who took their own lives, on the grounds that this might be encouraging suicides.

All of the workers who committed suicide were between 18 and 24 years old. As Labor Notes reported, the deaths were “the result of 12-hour shifts, alienation from not being allowed to speak to co-workers, and a rapid just-in-time production model that has workers putting in a phone motherboard every seven seconds to meet the global demand for high-priced gadgets.”

Daisey depicted the cult he vowed for Apple products: “I entered the House of Steve Jobs. I followed the stations of his Calvary.  I was amazed how Jobs started the revolution in graphic interfaces, and tactile technology…After visiting the sweatshop factories, I reflected a great deal. How does the gadget looks in the hand of a consumer, how it resembled once taken apart…But it never crossed my mind to investigate what happens in the manufacturing process…We are living in denial: We want to accept the situation as a normal way of doing business…For so long, Apple has been boasting to be at the edge of innovation, leader of digital sector, and reaping huge advantage in public relation…Well, to be a leader means to admit and start behaving like leaders…Steve Jobs has betrayed his ideals, as many of the baby-boom representatives…”

Apple CEO Steve JobsApple CEO Steve Jobs

“This don’t-be-evil mantra. It’s bullshit.” August 17, 2010
— Steve Jobs, on Google’s informal slogan

Jason Farbman wrote (I’ll abridge and edit slightly): “WALL STREET has called the end of an era and the beginning of the next one,” proclaimed the New York Times in late May. Apple Computer, widely perceived to be on its financial deathbed as recently as the late 1990s, had become the most valuable tech company in the world, with total outstanding stock worth $222.12 billion (outpacing Exxon).

So how was this possible when a decade ago the US economy was not expanding?

As one executive put it, summarizing the attitude of the rest: “Microsoft depends more on maintaining the status quo, while Apple is in a constant battle to one-up itself and create something new.”  The narrative was simple, and as old as the free market itself: Apple, down to its last dime, lived up to its slogan to “think different,” worked hard and pulled itself up by the bootstraps.

But did Apple really manage to leapfrog the mighty and ruthless Microsoft on the strength of good ideas and work ethic alone?

All of the workers who committed suicide in the sweatshop factories were between 18 and 24 years old. As Labor Notes reported, the deaths were “the result of 12-hour shifts, alienation from not being allowed to speak to co-workers, and a rapid just-in-time production model that has workers putting in a phone motherboard every seven seconds to meet the global demand for high-priced gadgets.”

Apple’s skyrocketing fortunes seem to have carried CEO Steve Jobs further away from reality. Steve has defended conditions at the Foxconn plant, saying: “You go in this place, and it’s a factory but, my gosh, they’ve got restaurants and movie theaters and hospitals and swimming pools. For a factory, it’s pretty nice.” (Steve Jobs forgot to mention who actually use the swimming pool and movie theaters after working 12 hours on a production chain…? Read note 3)

While desperate conditions of near-slavery are the most damning indictment of the company, and Microsoft may continue to be perceived as nasty, monopolistic and determined to “preserve the status-quo,” Apple’s reputation for being the opposite is increasingly undeserved.

Apple does make exciting products. I became a convert several years ago after receiving a hand-me-down MacBook from my sister. Today, there might as well be a glowing apple on my back–one of Apple’s products is rarely out of reach, whether it is the laptop I throw in my bag before my daily commute, or the iPhone that lives in my pocket.

But it’s become hard to tell why anyone should consider Apple’s business strategies any differently from those of Microsoft in the 1990s, when the software giant was investigated and penalized for its monopolistic practices by the U.S. and European Union.

Apple is currently a prime candidate for the same kind of investigation. The Justice Department is investigating threats by Apple against two major record companies: Apple was trying to keep the record labels from participating in a promotion for Amazon.com, whose music sales are a rival to Apple’s iTunes.

Considering the state of the corporate music industry today, it’s pretty astounding to think that anyone could intimidate a major label. But with iTunes currently sitting on 70 percent of all digital song sales, Apple is able to do pretty much whatever it wants.

For example: Have you ever tried to use a non-Apple mp3 player with iTunes? Actually, before you answer that, can you even name the top two or three mp3 players not produced by Apple?

This was, in fact, the driving idea behind the iTunes Music Store: to dominate digital music at 99 cents a pop in order to sell millions of music players at up to $499 a pop.

On the off-chance that you do have an mp3 player not made by Apple, you’re probably painfully aware that you simply can’t sync to your Mac’s music collection. Jason Calacanis, writing in The Case Against Apple, invites readers to imagine the outrage if Microsoft had made its Zune the only player compatible with Windows.

Then there’s Apple’s exclusive contract with AT&T for cellular service for the iPhone. As Calacanis says: “Apple’s iPhone is a revolutionary product that has devolved almost all of the progress made in cracking AT&T’s monopoly in the ’70s and ’80s. We broke up the Bell Phone only to have it put back together by the iPhone. Telecommunications choice is gone for Apple users.”

The ridiculous Apple approval process for iPhone applications is the very definition of a monopoly. In the company’s own words, applications aren’t allowed on its mobile operating system that “duplicate the functionality” of software that Apple also makes. So if you compete with Apple, you won’t have access to one of the biggest mobile platforms around today.

This monopoly led to a phenomenon known as “jail-breaking”:  Altering the iPhone to run unauthorized applications. There are countless things that the power of an iPhone should be able to do if the creative power of developers were allowed to run free. Instead of encouraging that creativity, Apple has done everything it can to make each software update render a jail-broken phone inoperable.

Many of the best innovations of independently developed iPhone apps have been co-opted, diluted and incorporated into later versions of Apple’s own software.

In July, during its review of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the Library of Congress exempted jail-breaking from the laws restrictions, making it officially legal. It remains to be seen how nicely Apple will play in the wake of this ruling.

By all accounts, Jobs has reinvented not just a corporation but whole industries: animated film (Pixar), music sales (iTunes), audio equipment (iPod) and mobile telephones (iPhone).

The latest iPad device from Apple was widely predicted to revolutionize newspapers, and perhaps the entire publishing industry. I was confused as to why I should shell out for a big iPhone that can’t make phone calls.

For example, audiophiles have long decried the iPod, currently the de-facto standard in portable music players, for its role in promoting the mp3 file format, with its low audio quality, and its refusal to play higher-quality formats.

But you won’t hear any of these debates in the mainstream coverage of Apple. “More features?” How many times can Jobs convince people to wildly overpay for a phone that will be obsolete in a year when Apple adds “more features” that should have been included when the original device was released.

In a recent sales speech, Jobs announced that multitasking, or the ability to run multiple applications simultaneously, would be included with the release of the iPhone 4.0.  Why Apple remembered multitasking after it has sold over 34 million iPhones, 20 million iPod Touches and 2 million iPads before adding multitasking? Apple has sold more than 56 million of these devices worldwide, and they can barely do more than one thing at a time.(Read note 2)

Apple claims that its products are less prone to being infected by the viruses and other digital vandalism that has proliferated in the era of the Internet. In a CNET.com interview, famed hacker-turned-digital-security-consultant Marc Maiffret was clear:

“Anytime there’s been a hacking contest, within a few hours, someone’s found a new Apple vulnerability. If they were taking it seriously, they wouldn’t claim to be more secure than Microsoft because they are very much not…The reason we don’t see more attacks out there compared to Microsoft is because their market share isn’t near what Microsoft’s is”.

The two factors in the targeting of Microsoft products were: One, they were the biggest player in town; and two, they were widely perceived to be monopolistic jerks whose drive for profit was far greater than their desire to encourage exciting software development.

On both counts, Apple should watch out.

Is there anything revolutionary about an overpriced computer crippled by an uncooperative, deliberately closed design, and manufactured under conditions so unbearable they drive people to suicide, just because people can carry it in their pockets?

A genuine revolution would make virtual slavery something associated with an old, out-of-date version of humanity.

Note 2: Steve Wozniak wrote in his autobiography iWoz: “The first question that Jobs asked me as he watched me design the first Apple was: “Can we include multitasking”? That story took place in 1975! Can we claim that Jobs has been willingly betraying his consumers all this time? Or did Jobs realized that consumers want “one gadget, one task” because they hate to be confused? What do you think?

Note 3: Steve Jobs forgot to mention who actually use the swimming pool and movie theaters after working 12 hours on this Chinese production chain.  How many of the workers can afford to patronize the restaurants at one dollars per hour? May be a small bowl of soup and a larger bowl of plain boiled rice? Steve dealt with the Human Factors concerns in the interfaces of his gadgets and reaped profits.  Steve Jobs could have as well demonstrated concerns of the Human Factors safety, health, and job satisfaction in these sweatshop factories…Couldn’t he do it?  Steve didn’t want to juggle with two apples at the same time?  He could have appointed a team of concerned Human Factors engineers?

Steve is no longer among us, and I suggest that Apple leaders establish a small assembly line in Cupertino in order to study interfaces in the workshop and communicate consequences with their Chinese and Taiwanese counterparts.  Time to care to the workers who are making life of the common people more exciting and the universe more open.  I wonder: “Have the workers been asked to test the pre-products for performance?  Or is it a very dangerous proposition to allow workers to taking breaks from the tedious chain work and let their spirit soars and wonder on the potentials of a better life, in a powerful gadget that fit in a pocket?

Steve Wozniak on Steve Jobs

This is an extract from the autobiography iWoz, which I translated from Arabic, and previously from the French version, go figure!

Steve Wozniak wrote: “My first encounter with Jobs was thanks to “cream soda” computer, a first version of personal computer in the early 70’s.  I was 4 years older than Jobs who was still in Los Altos high school, a few miles from Sunnyvale where I lived. Jobs was of the same age as my friend Bill Fernandez.

One day, Fernandez told me: “I recently met Steve Jobs.  This guy is in love with technology and very funny.  You must meet him”

We got together at Fernandez home and we shot the breeze outside. We realized that we shared many interests.

I had hard time explaining to Jobs the intricacies of the small computer version that I was designing, but he was a quick learner, and I liked this slender and energetic guy.

Jobs paid us a visit in the garage of Fernandez where we were assembling a computer from scratch. My main project in high school was to own my personal computer that would be flexible enough to be programmed in FORTRAN.

To me, digital age started in March 1975.

We formed a group called “Homebrew Computer Club” and met in the garage of Gordon French, who was jobless at the time. It is in that period that I started designing my Apple A.

Jobs was interested if I could expand the capability to include Time Sharing facilities like the one offered by “Cal Computer“.  I said: “Sure I can, but not immediately”

Later, Jobs asked: “Could we add a disk for saving data?” I replied “Sure I can, shortly…” I was using DRAM of AMI.

Jobs asked: “Could we substitute this DRAM to the one produced by INTEL?”  I said sure I can, but I cannot afford this better product…”

A few calls later, Jobs secured a few fee samples of these expensive and rare INTEL DRAMs.  In such matters, Jobs was priceless: If left to me, I would have never made the appropriate called; I am very introvert…

In November 1976, Jobs proposed that we build electronic cards for the various computer designs (costing $20 a piece) and selling them for $40 to the club members.  Arithmetic showed that we could not generate any profit, given that we needed one thousand dollars in investment and the number of club members was below 50.

While driving, Jobs said: “You know, even if we lose money, we would have instituted our own company, our first.”

By early 1977, we had sold 150 computers,  We were touring and crisscrossing California, and dropping on retail stores, on the look-out for agents to our Apple A.

Note 1: William Choukeir told me that Steve Wozniak was a super technician, while Jobs was the super programmer in the partnership: When Jobs worked at Atari, he was paid $650 for every redundant ship he could remove from the design.  The design of the computer game got so anorexic that the company paid Steve $5,000 bonus.  I thought that Steve Wozniak was the programmer for the first Apple A computer.  In the 70’s, I don’t think there was any serious demarcation line between the two professions. In the last two decades, computer designers and programmers are two distinct fields of study. Any feedback?

Note 2: This post is translated from Arabic in the Lebanese daily Al Nahar, itself translated from the French daily Le Monde, just because the “private library”, at walking distance from home, does not carry English books, dailies, or magazines. Hope my version is as readable and accurate as the original.

“Your time is limited”: Steve Jobs on TED

“Your time is limited: Don’t waste it living someone else life.

Your time is limited: Don’t be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people’s thinking.

Your time is limited: Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important,

Your time is limited: Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become.

Everything else is secondary.”  This is a portion of Steve talk to TED (Technology, Education, and Development company that extend licenses for local and other country entrepreneurs to diffusing the talks of speakers (famous and less famous) registered twice a year at paid events).

I have read most of these inspiring slogans.  That Steve adopted them is great relief and a catalyst for the visionaries.

Aware users of Ipod and Iphone must be implicitly sending silent prayers to Steve in the coming weeks:  How many of us could dream of such a luxury?

If the natural parents of Steve (see biographical note) had decided to raise him, would Steve finish a university degree? Most probably, yes.  It is tradition for Near-East Mediterranean Sea family to see to it that their children graduate from universities.  Would Steve be a success story? Why not.  Would it be “this kind of success story”?

Did the adoptive family of Jobs done a good job? They let Steve try all kinds of electronic gadgets… Steve was so lucky: He managed to survive the critical first five years, be adopted, be fed adequately, be raised in the land of opportunities…

Streams of scientists, researchers, discoverers preceded Steve and set the foundation in digital communication and computing…The last visionary occupies front page in mass medias, but not necessarily in 20% of all messages sent on Twitter…

For how long Steve and his vision will last on front page? How long till it is relegated to virtual has been? Who is the next visionary to monopolize front page?

Someone wrote: “For us in Palo Alto, Steve Jobs was 15 minutes walk away…”  How many dared walk toward Steve direction?

Your time is limited.  Do you have a vision? Can you sustain pressure and enjoy working under pressure? If not, select another vision that requires as much work, but less stupid pressures that ruin your joy for life.  Do not worry, someone else will pick up your first vision and run with it: You have contributed to the implementation of the vision, given that you published in details your daydream project, regardless if many would deny you the essential contribution.

Work hard, not mindlessly, but mindlessly hard as you identified your strongest passions, which converge toward your dream of “What work makes me happiest?”

And the cycle closes in: Spirit, virtual vision, daydream detailed project, applied matters, trends, spirit…Most people never cross the phase of attempting to publish their daydream project.  Why?  They don’t want to be humiliated by a few of the community pointing their fingers saying: “The fool. He can’t even earn a living…” We are surviving life!

Many blame Steve for not paying close attention to the sweatshop factories overseas, manufacturing the gadgets…

William told me that Steve was a super programmer: When Steve worked at Atari, he was paid $650 for every redundant ship he could remove from the design.  The design got so anorexic that the company paid Steve $5,000 bonus.  I thought that Steve Wozniak was the programmer for the first Apple computer. Any feedback?

Biographical Note: Steve was born in Feb. 24, 1955 from an American lady (Joanne Simpson) and the Syrian Abdul Fattah Jandaly.  They got married two years after Steve’s birth. In the mean time, the Jobs family had adopted Steve. In 1967, at age 12, Steve was admitted to a summer training with Hewlett-Packard: He called directly William Hewlett.

Steve graduated from Homestead high school (Cupertino) in 1972. He could not suffer university formal learning and worked with Atari (electronic games) from 1974 to 76. In July 1976, Jobs and Steve Wozniak launched Apple 1, for $666.  Why this number 666?

Steve  married Loren Powell in 1991 and has three children.  The fourth child is from Chrissa Brennan. Steve died of cancer in the pancreas.


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