Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘terminally ill patients

Pain is living: Early actions let you live better

The trouble with pain is ignoring it.

Toothaches begin as dull twinges. Tumors are coughs. Before long, fillings are root canals and tumors are death.

Toothaches and tumors never magically go away.

I’m not ready to check with a physician means it doesn’t hurt enough.

By Dan Rockwell?

Pain is a slow sunrise, quiet. But, noon always comes. Listen to pain in the morning; don’t wait for noon.

Courage:

Life without pain is death.

Leaders courageously listen for pains voice. Delay invites damage. Pain is not the enemy. Invite it in for a chat. “Damn that hurts.”

The role of pain:

  1. Pain screams “something’s wrong” but doesn’t solve or correct.
  2. Pain points to symptoms not root problems.
  3. Pain is a consequence not a cause, at least at first.
  4. Pain succeeds when we look for causes and cures.
  5. Pain solves when stopping is enough.
  6. Everything that hurts isn’t bad.

Distraction:

“Just make it stop,” is a distraction. Leaders look through pain to find real issues.

Under-performing employees are the toothache, but the root problem may be organizational, for example.

Correcting under-performers may provide surface solutions; developing organizations capacities provides deep cures.

Dull ache:

You’re feeling dull aches that suggest intervention.

  1. Relational aches.
  2. Staff malfunctions.
  3. Inner dissatisfaction.
  4. Customer distress.
  5. Procedure failures.

Approach:

  1. Point out pain-points and ask, “What’s behind this issue?”
  2. “Is it escalating or de-escalating?”
  3. “Does this situation require intervention? Why or why not?”
  4. “What are you doing about it?”
  5. “How can I help?”
  6. “Can we solve this with current or new procedures?”
  7. “Tell me more next week.”

All leaders have stories of toothaches that turned to root canals and tumors that killed.

I’m not ready means it doesn’t hurt enough.

Leaders don’t address every issue; they give space for others to find solutions. However, leaders always monitor pain-points. Don’t pretend they’ll go away.

Do you tend to delay too long, act too quick, or move-in on pain-points at just the right moment?

How do you address pain-points?

Note: For terminally ill patients, when all kinds of tranquilizers stop functioning, do you believe a patient still keep thinking: “As long as I’m in pain, then I’m alive?”

Anouk: Nurse (by Anna Gavalda)

Anouk was very beautiful; she got pregnant early on in her youth with a musician who did the disappearing act.  Anouk had to raise Alexis and worked as a nurse in a hospital in Paris.

She worked as nurse most of her life and served in all the difficult units or services, especially the terminally ill patients.  The administration upgraded her position to supervisor in chief.

Anouk was not into administration paperwork, since she preferred to tend directly patients instead of paperwork, assigning and scheduling nurses and functions.

Anouk’s motto was: “Patients are forbidden to die on my watch“.  She uplifted their morale, made the sick cry and laugh; she hugged them and touched them.

After her formal service hours, she would lightly paint her eyes, lips, do her hair and wear nice dresses and then visit with patients who are discarded by their relatives and never received visits.  It was Anouk’s way of giving patients the sense of being with family.  In short, all the behaviors that nurses are not permitted to do with patients or frowned at by management.

Nurse Anouk was untouchable in the hospital:  She was the best of nurses.  What she lacked in medical knowledge she compensated by her extreme attention to her patients.  She was the first to notice the slightest changes in patients’ behavior and to perceive the tiniest symptoms.  And best, she had this extraordinary instinct to what’s going wrong.

During their daily rounds on patients, physicians and surgeons lent particular ears to Anouk’s comments and feedback. Nobody in the hospital or the patients resisted to Anouk:  She imposed respect by her tenderness, compassion and professionalism.

Anouk knew the names, faces, and stories of her patients; she knew their families and befriended their family members.  Anouk told lots of stories, imagined plenty of stories, invented stuff of wonderful concerts she attended, famous and glamorous people she met and befriended.

New nurse recruits adored her and aided them in their first contacts with patients.  At night fall, when every nurse and employee is totally tired they could hear Anouk’s laughing and crying with patients.  Older nurses knew that Anouk was indeed doing her best to amusing and lightening her heavy life.  Probably, she gave life to patients because she had no life after her service hours.

Once, Anouk’s neighbor lady gave her a plant.  The next week, Anouk returned the gift crying profusely:  Anouk was used to seeing many patients die but she could not bear experiencing a plant eventually die, out of her watch.

Alexis turned out to be a musician too and he was addicted to all kinds of drugs. Professional Anouk did not suspect that Alexis got into hard drugs since she was not in frequent touch with him and he had moved out from home.

One morning, emergency called Anouk and informed her that Alexis is succumbing to a overdose and is showing early signs of AIDS.  Something snapped in Anouk.  She became an automaton, a machine delivering smiles but she was still being obeyed.  Anouk quit her supervisory function to finding the best medical treatment to her unique son.

Later, Anouk would resign from the hospital when she realized that she was totally alone and everybody in her family had left her or quit on her; she wanted to take the initiative this time around:  It would have too hard to be retired from the hospital, the only real home of hers.

Note:  This story is part of the French book “La Consolante” (the rematch) by Anna Gavalda.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

August 2020
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