Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘village of Bilin

Notes and tidbits posted on FB and Twitter. Part 161

Note: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. I pa attention to researched documentaries and serious links I receive. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains a month-old events that are worth refreshing your memory.

Since 2005, and for 7 years, numerous men and women Palestinians in the village of Bilin courageously have faced Israeli forces in order to prevent further colonization of their villages, the destruction of their resources and the subjugation of their people.

Hana al-Shalabi (Hanaa2), a 30-year-old Palestinian woman from Jenin, is on hunger strike to protest her administrative detention without charge by Israel. She was subjected to beatings and humiliating treatment by Israeli forces and declared that her hunger strike will continue until her demand for freedom is met.

Women of the Middle East and North Africa are of compelling strength, boundtless courage and incorruptible dignity. History is laden with prominent female activists, poets, authors and political figures from this region who have long existed, despite the deliberate evasion of their stories and in the printing their names, and they will continue to exist.

Why lament about how others write about you; write your own histories. I personally would love to read about these female heroes.
Long ago, there was a Medieval Kingdom of Khazaria ( 652-1016 AD) that included part of modern-day Russia, Ukraine, and a sliver of what is current Kazakhstan.  When considering the choice among Islam, Christianity or Judaism the leaders of this ’empire’ decided to declare themselves Jewish. They had no understanding of the culture of the original land (Levant civilization) and simply followed the rules and prescriptions of the conservative Jews. They are the current Ashkenazim Jew who lived in central Europe, after the Russian Ivan dispersed them in the year 1,000.

The Khazaria Empire could not extend any further south because the Tatars and Turkmen proved to be about as obstinate as the Afghans have been throughout history.

The Khazarian ‘Jews’ are NOT descendants of the mythical “12 Tribes of Israel” and their world view, and of pious spiritual Judaism have created conflict within that religion ever since. They are the current day Zionist Ashkenazim Jews (including Neocons, of course) who have formed a world power banking, extortion cult of war and death that has little or nothing to do with being devout adherents of Judaism. These are the folks who think nothing of breaking the law, lying (Kol Nidre), stealing, graft, corruption, assassination, blackmail, extortion or destroying tens of millions of people to get their way.

In 1997, Christoph Meili was a security guard, who happened upon 2 carts full of Holocaust-era banking documents related to Jewish clients of UBS that were slated for destruction. Inspired by “Schindler’s List,” Meili removed several volumes of the documents from his employer’s possession. Instead of going directly to the authorities, he instead disclosed the documents to outside sources. As a result, not only did Meili lose his job, but he was also under investigation by Swiss authorities for violating Swiss law.

Since 2,000, Israel killed 2,027 Palestinian children.

Notes and tidbits posted on FB and Twitter. Part 160

Note: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. I pay attention to researched documentaries and serious links I receive. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains a month-old events that are worth refreshing your memory.

The individual is already crumbling under so many responsibilities, in the name of a capitalist ideology and supported by religious sects, and expecting a secular mind to come alive is above the capabilities of even a few to shoulder.

History confirms that Arab women have long played an active political role in their societies. From Egyptian women who demonstrated alongside men during the Egyptian Revolution of 1919, against British occupation of Egypt and Sudan, to resistance fighter Jamila Bu Hreid of Algeria.

If you want to make a deal to lose a game: let it be in an individual game, Not a team game. That’s your negotiated and consented deal.

When it comes to negotiate a team to lose games, it is very wrong at any level and no excuses are admissible. A team must have a tacit oath of loyalty that every member is to perform at best he can, and enjoy the friendship of the members. Otherwise, morale is chattered for a very long period: better search for another team

Consider the problems that an excellent human factors designer has to cope with when he has to incorporate the human dimensions into his design (hundred of factors to control) and the body of multidimensional knowledge he has to learn and incorporate in his practice.

History demonstrated that glorious periods in any civilization around the world are usually focused in a country, a city, a university, or a center.

Glorious periods are also focused on a hobby (a lifetime love affair) such as in architecture, painting, sculpting, music, literature, sciences, math, philosophy, singing, dancing, acting, movie, and so on.

How many new colonies and settlements by Israeli settlers have to be built before admitting that it is becoming a cause to resistance and not just a consequence to Palestinian resistance?”

Prior to the deposing of Tunisia’s Zine el Abidine Ben Ali there was little or no media attention given to Arab women in respect to what role they played in the region, besides being propagandized as second-class to their more aggressive male counterparts.

Although the media claims to be on a scavenger-hunt of sorts, in search of the dauntless women of the Middle East, there has always been little talk of female Palestinian heroines and their struggle against Israel’s brutal system of apartheid and occupation of their native land.

Since 2005, and for 7 years, numerous men and women Palestinians in the village of Bilin courageously have faced Israeli forces in order to prevent further colonization of their villages, the destruction of their resources and the subjugation of their people.

TORTURE and ABUSE , PRISONERS, and ADMINISTRATIVE DETENTION of Palestinians in Israel occupied territories

FACTS & FIGURES –

PRISONERS

‘Israeli military justice authorities arbitrarily detained Palestinians who advocated non-violent protest against Israeli settlements and the route of the separation barrier.

In January,a military appeals court increased the prison sentence of Abdallah Abu Rahme, from the village of Bil’in, to 16 months in prison on charges of inciting violence and organizing illegal demonstrations, largely on the basis of coerced statements of children.’

  • According to the Israel Prison Service, there were about 4424 Palestinian prisoners and security detainees being held in Israeli prisons as of the end of April 2012. According to prisoners’ rights organization Addameer, there were 4653 Palestinians imprisoned by Israel as of May 1, 2012.
  • Since 1967, Israel has imprisoned upwards of 700,000 Palestinians from the West Bank, Gaza, and East Jerusalem, or about 20% of the total population of the occupied territories.
  • Those who are charged are subjected to Israeli military courts that human rights organizations have criticized for failing to meet the minimum standards required for a fair trial.
  • According to Amnesty International’s 2011 Annual Report on Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories: “Palestinians in the [occupied territories] subject to Israel’s military justice system continued to face a wide range of abuses of their right to a fair trial. They are routinely interrogated without a lawyer and, although they are civilians, are tried before military not ordinary courts.”
  • According to Human Rights Watch’s 2012 World Report:

– TORTURE & ABUSE –

  • Until 1999, the use of torture by Israeli military and security forces was both widespread and officially condoned under the euphemism of “moderate physical pressure.” Methods included beatings, forcing prisoners into painful physical positions for long periods of time, and sleep deprivation.
  • In 2000 it was revealed that between 1988 and 1992 Israel’s internal security force, the Shin Bet, had systematically tortured Palestinians during the first, mostly nonviolent, uprising against Israel’s occupation, using methods that went beyond what was allowable under government guidelines for “moderate physical pressure.”
  • These methods included violent shaking, tying prisoners into painful positions for long periods, subjecting them to extreme heat or cold, and severe beatings, including kicking. At least 10 Palestinians died and hundreds of others were maimed as a result.
  • In 1999, the Israeli Supreme Court ruled that the use of “moderate physical pressure” was illegal, however reports of torture and abuse of Palestinian prisoners continued unabated.
  • Amnesty International’s 2011 Annual Report on Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories states:

    Consistent allegations of torture and other ill-treatment, including of children, were frequently reported. Among the most commonly cited methods were beatings, threats to the detainee or their family, sleep deprivation, and being subjected to painful stress positions for long periods. Confessions allegedly obtained under duress were accepted as evidence in Israeli military and civilian courts.

  • Other abusive practices employed by Israel against Palestinian prisoners include the use of solitary confinement, denial of family visits, and forcing prisoners to live in unsanitary living conditions.
  • The harsh conditions endured by Palestinians in Israeli prisons prompted a series of hunger strikes, including a mass hunger strike by more than 1500 prisoners in early 2012 leading to some concessions from Israel. The concessions reportedly included an end to the use of solitary confinement as a punitive measure and allowing family visits for prisoners from Gaza.

– ADMINISTRATIVE DETENTION –

  • Israel uses a procedure known as administrative detention to imprison Palestinians without charge or trial for months or even years. Administrative detention orders are normally issued for six-month periods, which can be extended indefinitely.
  • Administrative detention was first instituted by the British during the Mandate era in 1945, prior to the creation of Israel.
  • There are currently as of May 29, 2012, approximately 308 Palestinians being held in administrative detention.
  • Since 1967, some 100,000 administrative detention orders have been issued by Israel.
  • Although there are none currently being held in administrative detention, Israeli authorities have in the past used the procedure against Palestinian children as well as adults.
  • Israel’s frequent use of administrative detention has been condemned by human rights organizations such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, as well as Israeli human rights groups like B’Tselem.
  • An end to the use of administrative detention was one of the main demands of a recent wave of hunger strikes by Palestinians in Israeli prisons.
  • In May 2012, Israeli Public Security Minister Yitzhak Aharonovitch implicitly admitted that Israel uses administrative detention for reasons other than stated urgent “security” concerns, urging authorities to “use it only if there’s a need.”

Israeli soldiers “gas” themselves in village of Bilin

Last week, Israeli soldiers and police dispersed by force and tear gas hundreds of Palestinians who were trying to rebuild a village that Israel completely erased in the Jordan Valley in 1967. The village of Bilin is another story of confronting the occupier.

Mind you that the Jordan Valley is withing the West Bank territory, but Israel built hundreds of “war settlements” in that region to exploit its water resources and prevent the Palestinians free access to the State of Jordan.

Every week, Israel encourage its radical right-wing Jews to invade and “desecrate” the Islamic Temple in Jerusalem, or the Aqsa Dome Mosque.

Israel is progressing in its plan for erecting more settlement in East Jerusalem, proposed to be the Capital of the Palestinian State in the current negotiation with Kerry.

Cynical Idealism posted these funny pictures on Feb. 7, 2014

Israeli soldiers in Bil’in gas themselves, Palestinian kids chase them away, get gassed
https://m.facebook.com/Bilin.village

Controversy engulfs Oscar-nominated Palestine documentary

Oscar-nominated “5 Broken Cameras” has become a source of controversy among this year’s Oscar nominations, following Israel’s apparent appropriation of ownership in the wake of its nomination in the Best Feature-Length Documentary category.

The film collects together years’ worth of footage of demonstrations surrounding the struggle of the Palestinian villagers of Bilin, near the West Bank apartheid wall, which Palestinian film maker Emad Burnat originally collected together for Electronic Intifada.

Immediately following the film’s nomination, Burnat issued a statement saying:  “This is one of the happiest moments of my life.

Chris Newbould posted on Jan 28, 2013 in Middle East digital production

The village of Bilin is celebrating because of international support of my film. As a child I remember watching the Oscars on TV … I don’t recall seeing films about Palestine, the occupation or our struggles. Times have changed.”

It wasn’t long before the situation became more complicated.

Almost immediately following the nomination, the Israeli press, as well as sections of the US media, began referring to the film as an ‘Israeli’ one, with even the Israeli Embassy in Washington describing it as such when Tweeting its delight at the film’s nomination.

Burnat, unsurprisingly, disagreed, stating on his Facebook page that the film is a: “Palestinian film … My story, my village story, my people’s story, seven years I was working on the film.

Certainly the subject matter is hardly one you would expect Israel to be queueing up to applaud in the absence of an Oscar nomination, but things become yet more complicated as the film did indeed receive Israeli funding, as well as Palestinian and French funding, and also had two directors – Burnat himself, and Israeli co-director Guy Davidi.

Davidi seems to have attempted to play down the furor,  conceding that the film is both Palestinian and Israeli, and stating that he does not feel films should come with citizenship.

Indeed, technically the film’s citizenship should be of no relevance in this case.

It has not been nominated in the ‘Foreign Film’ categories, so no origin needs attaching to it for Oscar purposes, while both the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel and the Palestinian Boycotts, Divestments and Sanctions National Committee have confirmed it is not boycottable under their own regulations, which do not require the boycotting of artists who receive Israeli funding, providing their work is independent from the will of the Israeli state and government.

However, it seems the battle lines over ownership of the film have well and truly been drawn now, and indeed Burnat was quoted recently by a journalist at Australia’s Middle east News Service as saying: “If Israel continues to state that it is an Israeli film, I will pull the film from the Oscars. If Academy awards organizers would present Five Broken Cameras as an Israeli film – I won’t not there … all said and done it’s a Palestinian film. It was filmed here and presents the story of the village.

People in Bil’in say ‘we made a film that documents a seven years’ struggle to remove fence, and in the end you go to Israel and hand them over a gift?’ On the street they do not understand what is a co-production.”

The story seem set to run and run right up to the Oscar’s and beyond”.

The point is that this is not in a category where the national origin of the film is an issue, like in the Foreign Film category. For the Israelis to go around saying this is an “Israeli” production while in fact it is a Palestinian film about the struggle of a Palestinian village against Israel is total hypocrisy meant basically to steal the film’s thunder.

Note: The interview on CNN of Palestinian film maker Emad Burnat https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2013/02/14/five-broken-cameras-film-director-speaks-up-on-cnn-who-is-emad-burnat/

 


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