Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Yemen

Yemen’s Region of Al-Mahra at the intersection of Interests and Competitions

Al-Mahra province, in the eastern part of Yemen, has become a regional battleground for influence between the different actors in Yemen.

Saudi Arabia has stepped up its military, civil, political and social efforts to consolidate its power in the eastern province.

Al-Mahra, the eastern gateway to Yemen, is an exception in Oman’s policy, having historical relations with the local authorities in the province. Muscat is feeling for the first time a real competition to its influence in Al-Mahra as the two Gulf allies (KSA and UAE) are attempting to enhance or maintain their leverage in this governorate, as has already happened in other Eastern Yemen regions (Hadramawt and Socotra).

Yemen’s Al Mahra

Al Mahra is one of the most remote regions in the Easter part of Yemen. It was considered as the most stable part of Yemen when the civil war erupted in 2015.

This region was Not infiltrated by the jihadi groups contrary to the Hadramawt province on its West. The Mahra province is inhabited by Sunni tribes (an estimate of 350,000 residents) with history of marginalization by Sanaa’s authority and a cross-border informal economy.

The agreement made after the revolution in Yemen aiming to transform the country into a six-region federation is unpopular to some groups in Al-Mahra due to a fear for a merge with the neighboring Hadramawt governorate repeating the 1968 history when Al-Mahra was overrun by socialist forces entering from Hadramawt.[1]

The governorate has somehow remained under the control of the international recognized Hadi’s government since the Yemeni civil war broke-out, although the former president of Yemen Ali Abdullah Saleh had stationed military units in the region.[2] After months of the killing of President Saleh, the Emiratis and the Saudis have started to increase their involvement in Al Mahra.

Oman’s Foreign Policy: Security First

While ideology is driving the Foreign Policy of most of the Middle Eastern states, the Sultanate of Oman has followed its own course, believing that peaceful negotiation is essential to the overall, long-term goals of Omani security and prosperity.

The Sultan of Oman created a foreign policy based on non-intervention and non-alignment.

In the case of the Yemeni war, Oman played an important role as a mediator between the different warring parties. Its neutral stance regarding the Iranian Saudi cold war in the Middle East helped the Sultanate to have good relations with the Houthis and all other players.

Since the start of the latest war in Yemen, Oman has hosted Houthi leaders and representatives of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh. Furthermore, Muscat hosted secret negotiations between the Houthis and Riyadh in early 2016, and between U.S. officials and the Houthis in May 2015 and November 2016.[3]

Oman, Yemen and its Eastern Gateway

The important role of Yemen to the Omani leadership goes back to 1962 with the formation of anti-monarchist, pan-Arab, Marxist insurgency group called the Dhufar Liberation Front.

The main aim for the insurgency group was to overthrow Sultan Said of Oman and install a communist system with the help of South Yemen[4].

At the time of the Dhufar rebellion, Al-Mahra governorate of South Yemen, known as the Eastern gateway of Sultanate of Oman, had an important role to play in this proxy war between the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen (PDRY) and Oman.

Al- Mahra became the 6th Governorate of South Yemen after the British withdrawal from the region although the Mahari tribes were against the new Marxist-Leninist regime in South Yemen.

Declassified material from the British government’s archives, demonstrates that both the UK and Oman raised and trained groups of Mahra tribesmen – exiled from the PDRY – to launch cross-border raids into South Yemen between late 1972 and early 1975.

The archival material proves that both the Omani and British governments raised and supported the Mahra tribal militias (known collectively as the ‘firqat’, with each individual formation a ‘firqa’) for cross-border incursions.[5]

The Sultan of Oman used Mahra in a coercive as a response to the PDRY’s support for the insurgency in Dhufar.

Al-Mahra in the Emirati and Saudi Eyes

The killing of former President Saleh was the turning point for the changes on the ground in Eastern Yemen.

Many reports emerged about the UAE willingness to establish military units loyal to Abu Dhabi, “Mahri Elite Forces” as a similar model for the “Hadrami and Shabwani Elite Forces”.

The main aim for UAE and its ally KSA in this regard is to secure the land border with Oman and the sea borders from arms smuggling activities.[6]

KSA and its allies in Yemen were expressing concerns about Oman and Saleh loyalists in Al-Mahra smuggling weapons to the Houthis in North.[7]

A UN report mentioned that Iranian missiles sent to Houthis were transferred by pieces through the land routes from Oman or Ghaydah and Nishtun in al Mahrah governorate after ship-to-shore transshipment to small dhows.[8]

According to the British researcher Elisabeth Kendall, Mahri tribal voices raised doubts regarding UAE and KSA activities fearing that the trained armed units will be loyal to the Southern Transitional Council (STC), the Emirati-supported ‘third Yemeni government’, which pursues independence of the South and has opened a headquarter in Mahra.[9]

Afterwards, Saudi Arabia played an essential role in securing an agreement with Mahri representatives were these forces will work along the local tribes to stabilize the region, strengthen anti-smuggling operations and aid development.[10]

Another development that raised questions about the Saudi role in Al-Mahra was the establishment of a religious center in the city of Qashan, the third largest city in the province, similar to the center of Dar El Hadith in Dammaj, a small town in the Sa’dah Governorate of north-western Yemen, were the Salafist students left it in 2014 after clashes with the Houthis that lasted for months.

The opening of the center led to the organization of two protests by women in the province against the Salafism expansion in front of the governor’s office in the capital city of Al-Mahra.[11]

Intra-Gulf Rivalry

The increasing role of the Arab alliance in Al-Mahra raised the concerns if the Omani leadership that perceive this province historically as part of its national security.

Oman policy in Al-Mahra remain in offering humanitarian aid, building alliance with tribal actors, and offering double citizenship for Mahris to facilitate their trans-border work between Yemen and Oman.

On the other hand, the Emirati power grows day by day in Southern Yemen through their backed and well equipped elite forces‏ and their strong alliance with the Southern Transitional Council (STC).

Oman may be fearing that Al-Mahra province will be a new “Socotra” for Abu Dhabi falling totally under its influence. An important factor for UAE’s role is the geo-strategic goal for pursuing the string of strategic ports in Eastern Africa and the Indian Ocean (for example in Eritrea, Somaliland and Somalia).

Hadrami, Mahri coasts and Socotra Island are an essential part of the geo-strategic UAE plan. For the Saudi side, their main aim will remain to fight Houthis control over all the Yemeni territories and prevent the Iranian arms smuggling through the Mahri coasts.

Riyadh is using the military aid, double citizenship, and the humanitarian aids through Al Ghayda’s airport to keep its eyes on the situation in Al-Mahra province. It seems that the Saudi leadership are taking the concerns of the Mahri citizens into consideration and trying not to anger their “unique feature” in Southern Yemen.

Our latest article by Ramy Jabbour

For the Saudi side, their main aim will remain to fight Houthis control over all the Yemeni territories and prevent the Iranian arms smuggling through the Mahri coasts.

#Riyadh is using the military aid, double citizenship, and the humanitarian aids through Al Ghayda’s airport to keep its eyes on the situation in Al-#Mahra province.

It seems that the Saudi leadership are taking the concerns of the Mahri citizens into consideration and trying not to anger their “unique feature” in Southern #Yemen.

[1] Wim,T. (2014). INTERVIEW -East Yemen risks civil war and humanitarian crisis, says UK expert, Thomas Reuters Foundation, retrieved from:

[2] Dhahab, A. (2016). Yemen’s Warring Parties: Formations and Dynamics, Al Jazeera Centre For Studies, retrieved from:


Notes and tidbits posted on FB and Twitter. Part 150

Note: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. I pay attention to researched documentaries and serious links I receive. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains a month-old events that are worth refreshing your memory.

The foundations of capitalism have proven Not to function except within strong State institutions, which are almost totally controlled by the capitalist classes.

The one foundation that all economic systems in developed States share is free global trade, which means the liberty to exploiting the developing countries in natural resources and cheap labor. (And much lower interest rates on loan)

What’s the next step at the UN? Relative to Yemen, the millions succumbing to the cholera epidemic, the thousands dying like flies from diphtheria, undrinkable water, famine, lack of medical facilities and medicine?

What’s next at the UN concerning Palestinians, Palestinian State, and Palestinian entity and identity?

Chacun raconte sa vie comme ca l’arrange, et les autres qui la raconte comme ca leur arrange? Arranger peut avoir des connotations vilaines

We marry at an early age to basically flee home. If you disagree, from experience, do share your opinions.

Sadness doesn’t need to be treated with the urgency of a shark attack.

The inability to “just get over it” is called being in a depressed mood. Get over this lame sentence.

You cannot cure clinical depression by suggesting to eat ice cream. Maybe eating ice cream is Not meant for “normal people”?

Don’t think that being sad and being OK are incompatible. Yes, we can be sad and OK at the exact same time. TV, movies, popular songs and even people tell us if we’re not happy, there’s something wrong. and we’re taught that sadness is unnatural, and we must resist it. In truth, it’s natural and it’s healthy to accept sadness and know it won’t last forever. It means you are a reflective person

“Hey, call or text me anytime, but I might not be able to get back to you that same day.” It’s totally cool for you to make a narrow offer with really clear boundaries.

Ayaam al loulou ma hallaloulou. Al fekra moush waaridat ba3d al takaa3od wa al esteklal al mousta7aq

Kaa3ed etfarrage 3ala mouzaharaat. Fi shi bostat lel moutazahireen ila Kfarkela? Badi ekba3 sharit sha2ek abal ma al Israili ye3ammer another Wall of Shame 3ala 7oudoudna


Notes and tidbits posted on FB and Twitter. Part 131

Note 1: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains months-old events that are worth refreshing your memory.

Sure, Abdullah Saleh of Yemen is a master opportunist, but the Hawthis  need to balance their ideology to keep the security and integrity of Yemen. He mounted a coup on his partners, failed and was assassinated when fleeing, like his predessessors

It is Not because we never trusted the Saudi Kingdom frenetic “dominion” policy over their neighbors that we have to keep trusting the mullahs and wilayat Faqih of Iran once their power take roots.

Dans mon cas, la “folle du logis”, l’imaginaire des reves diurnes demande plus d’espace et deplace la memoire des details.

Je suis un auteur amnesiaque, une ardoise du passe’ mal effacee’. Si j’ai ecrit mon autobiographie, c’est justement pour mettre de cote’ cette ardois de malheur.

J’ insiste sur l’atmosphere generale, les sensations, les actions et reactions: Les details du passe’ ne me viennent pas.

Une foret dense est une foret, une jungle enigmatique, touffue, une representation de l’obscurite’, de l’irrationale, de la folie qui guette a tout moment.

The third impression is that State influence is relatively weak; almost all the economy is privatized. Discrepancies in social earnings are balanced out by social and community feeling of responsibilities toward the less well off. (Einstein in 1940 of the USA)

The rich people are willing to re-distribute a large chunk of their wealth and offer their services to the communities simply because public opinion is strong and demands such tendencies (Einstein in 1940 of the USA)

The 5th impression is that the US citizen is generally not receptive to classical music and plastic art. (Einstein in 1940 of the USA

Is it a good enough proposal for Moslem Brotherhood to claim that women will not be subjugated to the same servile standards as in Saudi Kingdom, the most obscurantist Wahhabi sect, to enhancing freedom of opinion, liberty, and equal rights in Egypt, Turkey and Qatar?

Talleyrand said during the revolution, which culminated in a period of utter Terror: “The French had no idea that in the Regency (during King Louis 16), in their long history, they never had it so well and lived that well” . De Tocqueville demonstrated that France was the best Kingdom in Europe during King Louis 16



Notes and tidbits posted on FB and Twitter. Part 122

Note 1: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains months-old events that are worth refreshing your memory.

Competence involves the humanity required to connect with other people, in real time. It requires emotional labor, not merely compliance with sequences and rules.

“If I don’t agree with myself, who will do it? If I only agree with myself, who am I?”

When people begin to measure themselves only in comparison to others (“How did I rank?”) then you need to accept the impact of those outsiders choices. Is the Culture of scarcity forcing on us competition? And in periods of abundance, can we change our mentality?

Think of the blockade of Iran since 1983.

Think of the blockade and sanctions against the Syrian people since 2011.

Think of the recent blockade of the Western African countries suffering from the Ebola epidemic: No border crossing, no meaningful trades with these poor countries…

Think of the siege of Homs, Aleppo, the Yarmouk Palestinian camp near Damascus, and the latest of Kobani (Ain Arab city)

Think of the conditions and the 3 consecutive preemptive wars on Gaza, this enclave constituting a big concentration camp

There is No average wars.  Simply because the distribution of wars follow the power law: How can we study a distribution of casualties when we add the WWI ad WWII wars or the genocides committed during Stalin, Cambodia, Rwanda., and the enduring civil wars in the Congo for the last 3 decades and yet not terminated, the situation in Sudan, Yemen, Afghanistan..?

Kidnapped French Rochot writes: “My life cycle revolved around two bottles: one bottle for drinking and the other one to urinate in.

Compulsive hoarding is a serious psychological difficulty which is not very well understood. It is characterized by extreme difficulty getting rid of belongings and excessive gathering of items to the extent that someone’s normal daily life is impacted. ( I know first hand from my mother and brother-in-law: It is an expensive and frustrating sickness that plague everyone around them)

A single State, confident in its far less loaded Crime Against Humanity record, must institute its International Court on State crimes against humanity. Many former officials have nightmares and want a court to stand trial and empty their loaded memories of bad decisions and going-along.

Soon, the International Court on Crimes against humanity will snatch the power to demand powerful nations to stand trial. All those Silent Majority will bow to the verdict and pay retribution.

 Si le Liban, depuis des décennies, ne traite pas ses propres poubelles, cela n’est pas la faute de Riyad ou Téhéran ou d’Israel ou de USA. 

Swapping wives in Saudi royal family. It is all done within the Wahhabi religious sect forms: The monarch or an emir from Al Saud divorces his wife and marry her to his brother and then may reclaim his former wife…

Yemenis: sieges and economic blockades harvest more casualties than field battles: Due to famine, malnutrition, dissemination of diseases, lack of medicine, high infantile mortality, polluted and infected water supply, and the casualties are essentially non-combatant people. Cholera and diphtheria epidemics adding to destruction of infrastructure and hospitals.

The health ministry in Yemen accounted for 200,000 deaths resulting from diphtheria epidemics



Saudi monarchy has lost its war in Yemen

Its illusory power purchased in malignant medias and with sectarian alliances:

Hassan Nasr Allah (General Secretary of Hezbollah of Lebanon) has manhandled this obscurantist monarchy’s “worthless pride“.

And this Wahhabi monarchy is reacting with virulent counter attacks on any media disseminating the free expressions of Nasr Allah, opinions based on facts that most reasonable person understand and had witnessed for decades, starting in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Egypt, Jordan, Yemen, Lebanon, Bahrain, Syria and Iraq.

Saudi Kingdom started sanctions on Lebanon and a series of internal meddling after the heart felt speech of Al Sayyed

The Arab world most serious descent into ignorance was not during the ottoman Empire dominion, but when the Saudi monarchy acceded to wealth to wreck havoc in the Arabic societies since 1925.

Million of kids are suffering from hunger in Yemen and thousands have succumbed to cholera that affected half a million.

Scores of Saudi reformists are being detained. Head chopping is still the regulation and increasing for other reasons Not mentioned in Shari3a.

Thousands of religious madrassat and mosques are still being erected everywhere, with Wahhabi clerics heading them and teaching extremist and terrorist behaviors to newer generations.

All enlightened leaders (Antoun Saadeh, Boumedian, Abdel Nasser …) have stated that as long as Saudi Kingdom (Wahhabi sect) is standing, there will be no peace or progress in the Arab World.

And this terror mentality (of considering every other belief system other than Wahhabi should be eradicated by death) is spreading all around the world communities via ISIS.

Mind you that the tomb of Prophet Mohammad was destroyed and Al Ka3ba was a target to be blown up until Britain pressured Saud to desist from this objective because its Moslem colonies were in upheaval.


Why Somali piracy is staging a comeback

After a five-year hiatus, hijackers have taken five vessels in the past month

BETWEEN 2008 and 2011, the waters off the coast of Somalia were the most treacherous shipping lanes in the world. More than 700 attacks on vessels took place in this period.

In early 2011, 758 seafarers were being held hostage by pirates.

Hijackings cost the shipping industry and governments as much as $7bn in 2012. But then, quite suddenly, the banditry stopped. (Need a better explanation than Suddenly)

The last hijacking of a merchant vessel occurred in May 2012. Until now.

There have been 5 confirmed incidents of piracy on the Gulf of Aden in the past month, beginning with the kidnapping of a Sri Lankan crew of the Aris 13 oil tanker on March 13th (they were later released without a ransom). After a five-year hiatus, piracy seems to have returned to the Horn of Africa. Why?

Attacks had slumped in large part thanks to beefed-up security measures. Rocketing insurance premiums meant shipping companies were forced to invest in armed guards, and to chart longer, safer routes far from the Somali coast.

Since armed guards first started crewing ships as protection against Somali pirates, none of their charges have been successfully hijacked. But smaller vessels keen to cut costs have grown complacent in recent months.

The Comoros-flagged Aris 13 was sailing close to the shore, and slow enough to attract attention. There were no armed guards on board. There were also fewer international naval patrols in the area than there had been.

But as when the first wave of piracy struck these waters back in the early 2000s, conditions on shore matter most. Somalia remains under-governed and mired in conflict.

Puntland and Galmudug, the two federal states nearest the most recent hijackings, are particularly troubled even by Somali standards.

Galmudug currently has no president and the regional government is stuck in an existential battle against Ahlu Sunna Waljama’a, a local Islamist militia. Puntland’s government is more capable but has problems paying its security forces. Islamic State has been making inroads.

And both, like the rest of Somalia, are suffering from a devastating drought. Young men are easy prey for the organised gangs that conduct piracy operations, especially those in coastal towns who have long complained about rampant illegal fishing in Somali waters, to which the international community has largely turned a blind eye.

Observers should be wary of proclaiming piracy’s return, cautions Timothy Walker of the Institute for Security Studies—since it never really went away.

The same gangs still operate, much like the clan-based militias that plague Somalia on land. Many remain involved in other forms of criminal activity, such as drugs smuggling.

While the Aris 13 was the first large merchant vessel to be hijacked in four years, smaller ones, most often local fishing boats, have continued to be targeted.

It is suspected that many more incidents go unreported. A lack of international victims had made it easy for the world’s attention to move elsewhere. But until piracy ceases to be an attractive business opportunity it will remain a plague.

Note: Any links of this resurgence with the war raging in Yemen? Many Somali trapped in Yemen are Not given access to return home because of maritime blockade on Yemen by USA, Saudi Kingdom and Qatar. This expansionist war on Yemen in order to have military bases in Yemen and occupying islands has already devastated the infrastructure and made 8 million kid suffer hunger and lack of medicine.


Yemen, Beyond the Headlines

Yemen is a country in the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula rich in culture, heritage, and history, with an extremely friendly and hospitable people.

Noon Arabia posted on Global Voice this 25 June 2013

But that doesn’t make the news.

The country is often misrepresented in Western media coverage, magnifying the country’s negative aspects.

A country of 24 million people of many different backgrounds “has been reduced to Al-Qaeda…wars, poverty, Qat, tribalism, or the ancestral home of Osama Bin Laden,” writes blogger Atiaf Alwazir (@womanfromyemen) in her post “The Flawed Media Narrative on Yemen“:

Today’s journalism on Yemen is no longer about getting the facts right, or inspiring people to think independently, it is about who can write the most sensationalized story on the country – no matter how many times it has already been told – because that is what sells.

But some Yemenis are trying to change that. Using film, photography, blogging, and social media, they want the world to see Yemen for its rich art, unique architecture, and the breath-taking landscapes and scenery that the country has to offer.

A panoramic view capturing Yemen's unique architecture by photographer: Mohammed Alnahdi

A panoramic view capturing Yemen’s unique architecture by photographer Mohammed Alnahdi.

Getting to know Yemen

Yemen is the one of the oldest civilizations in the world, with its history dating back to the first millennium B.C.

It was commonly known as Arabia Felix, meaning Fortunate Arabia or Happy Arabia.

In fact, four of the world’s heritage sites are in Yemen.

First, is the old capital itself, Sanaa. One of the oldest inhabited cities in the world, it boasts more than 103 mosques, 14 hammams (baths) and more than 6,000 multi-story mud houses with unique architecture, featuring spectacular decorated facades adorned with stained glass windows.

A video uploaded by UNESCO offers a glimpse of old Sanaa:

Second is Shibam, also known as the “Manhattan of the desert”, which is home to the oldest skyscrapers in the world — 500 mud-brick houses which are eleven stories high.

Shibam, the Manhattan of the desert, by photographer: Michail Vorobyev.

Shibam, the Manhattan of the desert, by photographer Michail Vorobyev.

Third is the island of Socotra, the largest member of an archipelago site, important for its biodiversity and distinct flora and fauna. According to UNESCO, “37% of Socotra’s 825 plant species, 90% of its reptile species, and 95% of its land snail species do not occur anywhere else in the world.”

Take a look at the island in this YouTube video uploaded by ToYemen:

The last is the picturesque coastal town of Zabid, with its narrow alleyways and burnt brick buildings.

Beyond the media’s portrayal

Various online efforts are being made to combat the media’s narrow view of Yemen.

This short 20-minute video film, made for the British Council’s Zoom Short Film Competition 2010 and uploaded to YouTube by ZoomCompetition, tries to correct misunderstandings about Yemenis conveyed through the distorted media coverage by showing their simple life:

To educate people on Yemen’s history and heritage, Yemeni Poet Sana Uqba (@Sanasiino), who lives in London, wrote and recited a powerful poem about Yemen (video uploaded by Yemeniah Feda’aih):

One of my most popular blog posts entitled “Yemen… unraveled facts about my beautiful homeland” highlights many hidden facts about Yemen, such as it being the source of one of the finest and most expensive honey in the world – the “Doani honey” – and one of the first countries to introduce coffee to Europe by exporting its own coffee brand out of the port of Mocha.

Fahd Aqlan, a 35-year-old Yemeni man residing in Cairo, Egypt, started a Facebook page called So you think you’ve seen Yemen? to counter misconceptions and show the world another aspect of Yemen beyond what is portrayed in news headlines.

Summer Nasser, a Yemeni activist and blogger based in New York, started another Facebook page entitled The People of Yemen, which as she describes is a “photo project which brings the life of Yemen, one picture at a time to it’s audience across the world.”

Others have spoken out in support of the country. Yemen-based journalist Adam Baron said in his Drones-Ad-Hoc hearing testimony:

Yemenis, as a rule, are nearly unfathomably friendly and welcoming.

On Twitter, Word Press Award winner and Spanish photojournalist Samuel Aranda (@Samuel_Aranda_) put in a good word for country as a foreigner:

@Samuel_Aranda_: For who thinks that in Yemen are only extremist. Visit Yemen!!!

Sampling Yemen’s cuisine

Yemeni food is often accompanied by homemade bread and cooked in stoneware. This photo show’s a typical breakfast or dinner made of bread, fava beans, and liver accompanied by tea with milk and cardamon:

A typical Yemeni breakfast or dinner

A typical Yemeni breakfast or dinner. Photo courtesy “So you think you’ve seen Yemen?” Facebook page.

Bint El Sahn is a very popular and traditional Yemeni dish. Literally translated to English, it means “daughter of the plate.” It is made of many layers of dough, baked and served with a drizzle of honey on top. It is consumed during the meal as a main dish, not a desert.

The famous Bint El Sahn. Photograph by Hend Abdullah

The famous Bint El Sahn. Photograph by Hend Abdullah

Yemeni Kitchen is a great blog for an introduction to the country’s cuisine. The blog, as described by the authors, “focuses on Yemeni Food with a historical twist.” Not only does it provide a step-by-step recipe of the dishes it introduces, but it also describes the history behind them as well.

Yemeni music and dance

A traditional northern Yemeni dance is called Bara’a and is performed with swift movements carrying a Janbiya, the Yemeni dagger, while dancing to the tunes of the Yemeni drum and muzmar, a type of Yemeni flute. Watch how young people perform this art in this video up loaded to YouTube by GTB313:

In the south, there is Hardamout dance and music, as seen in this YouTube video uploaded by Yemen Reform:

To listen to various Yemeni songs and rhythms, check out the following links: Ayoub Tarish is a famous Yemeni singer and composer; Yemen Reform provide YouTube videos of different Yemeni singers performing such as Alharethi, Alanessi, Alkebsi and also various Yemeni Nasheed Asswat Yemenia (Yemeni voices), and in addition to that it has songs for Abu Bakr Salem Balfaqih, Ali Thahban and Mohammed Morsehd Naji among others;

My Diwan has the largest collection of Yemeni songs and Ahmed Fathi is a prominent Yemeni musician, singer, composer and Oud player.

Art, photography, and landscapes This video, uploaded by TourYemen, shows the art, culture, and breathtaking landscape and beautiful scenery in Yemen:

Another panoramic tour of Yemen is available in this video uploaded to YouTube by tomeriko:

More breath-taking photos of Yemen can be seen through the Facebook pages of photographers Ameen Al-Ghabri and Abu Malik:

A beautiful shot of the old city of Sanaa through the lens of Ameen Alghabri

A beautiful shot of the old city of Sanaa through the lens of Ameen Alghabri.

A selection of Photos of the portal city of Aden by Ameen Alghabri

A selection of photos of the portal city of Aden by Ameen Alghabri.

A breath taking view of the city of Ibb seen from a cliff. Photograph by Abu Malik

A breath taking view of the city of Ibb seen from a cliff. Photo by Abu Malik.

Some of the most famous Yemeni painters are Lamia Al-KibsiFouad Al-Foutaih and Mazher Nizar, and more of his work can be viewed here and here.

Oil painting by Fouad Al Foutaih, from the private collection of the author of this post, Noon Arabia

Oil painting by Fouad Al Foutaih, from the private collection of the author of this post, Noon Arabia.

For an alternative to Western media, follow local cultural and social stories through Yemen’s own media, such as The Yemen Times and La Voix du Yemen.


Written by Noon Arabia Posted 25 June 2013 9:15 GMT ·

Note: Since 2015, Saudi Kingdom, backed by USA, Britain and Israel have been bombing, and destroying all kinds of infrastructures in Yemen. Hospitals and schools have been air stroked. Sanctions and blockading seas and airlifts has set famine for 8 million kids. And for What? So that USA can have a naval base on the Red Sea.





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