Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Zine El Abidine Ben Ali

Notes and tidbits posted on FB and Twitter. Part 160

Note: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. I pay attention to researched documentaries and serious links I receive. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains a month-old events that are worth refreshing your memory.

The individual is already crumbling under so many responsibilities, in the name of a capitalist ideology and supported by religious sects, and expecting a secular mind to come alive is above the capabilities of even a few to shoulder.

History confirms that Arab women have long played an active political role in their societies. From Egyptian women who demonstrated alongside men during the Egyptian Revolution of 1919, against British occupation of Egypt and Sudan, to resistance fighter Jamila Bu Hreid of Algeria.

If you want to make a deal to lose a game: let it be in an individual game, Not a team game. That’s your negotiated and consented deal.

When it comes to negotiate a team to lose games, it is very wrong at any level and no excuses are admissible. A team must have a tacit oath of loyalty that every member is to perform at best he can, and enjoy the friendship of the members. Otherwise, morale is chattered for a very long period: better search for another team

Consider the problems that an excellent human factors designer has to cope with when he has to incorporate the human dimensions into his design (hundred of factors to control) and the body of multidimensional knowledge he has to learn and incorporate in his practice.

History demonstrated that glorious periods in any civilization around the world are usually focused in a country, a city, a university, or a center.

Glorious periods are also focused on a hobby (a lifetime love affair) such as in architecture, painting, sculpting, music, literature, sciences, math, philosophy, singing, dancing, acting, movie, and so on.

How many new colonies and settlements by Israeli settlers have to be built before admitting that it is becoming a cause to resistance and not just a consequence to Palestinian resistance?”

Prior to the deposing of Tunisia’s Zine el Abidine Ben Ali there was little or no media attention given to Arab women in respect to what role they played in the region, besides being propagandized as second-class to their more aggressive male counterparts.

Although the media claims to be on a scavenger-hunt of sorts, in search of the dauntless women of the Middle East, there has always been little talk of female Palestinian heroines and their struggle against Israel’s brutal system of apartheid and occupation of their native land.

Since 2005, and for 7 years, numerous men and women Palestinians in the village of Bilin courageously have faced Israeli forces in order to prevent further colonization of their villages, the destruction of their resources and the subjugation of their people.

Arab Spring preemptive history?

Funny piece: “Arab” political structure to go full cycle back to dictators and oligarchic system of governance no later than 2017? Actually it is taking place right now and the “Mass uprising” are supporting the potential new military dictators.

For example, Libya is experiencing a military coup claiming to disband the parliament that extended its term.

Egypt is about to elect its military Field Marshal Sisi to the presidency.

Tunisia managed to get over its unrest by adopting a constitution that didn’t mention Islam as the main source of civil laws and for equality in rights between the genders. The full cooperation of France and Algeria to block any infiltration of extremist jihadists from Libya and Mali into Tunisia bore fruit.

Karl reMarks posted this Feb. 10, 2014

A short, pre-emptive history of the Arab Spring

Most history books can be very tedious. They are also full of speculation and guesswork because they’re normally written many years after the fact.

Having lived through the ‘Arab Spring’, I decided to spare future generations the ordeal of figuring out what precisely happened between 2011 and 2017, which is the ‘Arab Spring’ officially ended.

To that end, I wrote this short, preemptive history that will render all future speculation about the subject entirely useless and leave future generations with more time on their hands to figure out what the point of Stonehenge was.

The Arab Spring was so called because it started in December (Isn’t December winter?).

But it’s a little-known fact that in Arabic it’s not called the Arab Spring, but ‘the so-called Arab Spring’. It is generally agreed that the Arab Spring started in Tunisia in December 2010, although some imaginative people date its beginning back to the ‘Beirut Spring’ of 2005, or the removal of Saddam Hussein by the Americans in 2003, or the invention of political metaphors by Thomas Friedman in 1983.

The Tunisian revolution ended with the swift departure of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, who subsequently became known as ‘Ben Ali the Hasty’. Although that was kind of pointless because nobody talked about him anymore and a thus an excellent moniker was wasted which is a shame because history books are full of such monikers. Like Louis the Fat and Leopold the Passive Aggressive, but I digress.

A footnote: Ben Ali went to live in Saudi Arabia like many a dictator before him.

It remains a historical curiosity to this day why Saudi Arabia is so keen on hosting dictators (remember Idi Amin of Uganda?) but some analysts have pointed out to the fact that this is because old dictators are referred to as ‘dinosaurs’, so Saudi Arabia is trying to maintain its supply of fossil fuels for the future.

Eleven days after Ben Ali’s departure a revolution started in Egypt demanding President Hosni Mubarak step down.

The revolution was started by Egyptian SECULARISTS, which is an acronym made up of the names of the groups participating in the revolution, such as the Sixth of April Movement, the Eleventh of April Movement, The Tenth of April Movement and so on.

As the days passed, the Egyptian Army was torn between its loyalty to Mubarak and the Egyptian desire to break Tunisia’s record of 28 days for a dictator stepping down, so it stepped in and forced Mubarak to step down after 18 days, thus ensuring Egypt’s name in the record books.

Mubarak was given the choice between prison and exile in Saudi Arabia, so he chose prison.

Most historians agree that what happened next was quite complicated to get into, and it is generally agreed that it’s best to skip a few paragraphs to the election of Field Marshall and Most Manly Man Abdul Fattah al-Sisi to President of Egypt in 2014 where he stayed in power until 2032 or forever, whichever comes first.

It was Libya’s turn next, according to an ancient Arab system that is based on observing the movement of the stars for a while and then realizing the futility of that and deciding to revolt.

The Libyan people decided to topple Gaddafi, but Gaddafi said he wasn’t actually the leader and reminded everyone of that episode in Seinfeld when Kramer couldn’t be fired from his job because he wasn’t actually employed by the corporation.

At this point, the world held its breath because this was the first Arab revolt not directed against a Western-friendly regime, particularly if we ignore Tony Blair’s grovelling to Gaddafi and the CIA making use of his state of the art torture facilities.

I mean Gaddafi’s torture facilities, not Tony Blair’s, because Blair preferred to rent facilities when he needed them, in keeping with his Third Way political philosophy which highlighted the importance of public-private partnerships.

After observing the situation for a few months, the West lept into action and decided that it would be convenient to abandon Gaddafi and to try to look like the good guys.

Gaddafi was given the choice between exile in Saudi Arabia and death, so he chose death. Nobody knows exactly what happened next in Libya, but maybe if you’re reading this in the future you could tell us.

At this point president Assad II of Syria was smugly going around telling everyone that there will be no uprising in Syria because he was a Just and Good Ruler.

President Assad had succeeded his father, who was coincidentally also called Assad, and had continued his father’s tradition of providing free public services like education, health and torture. But the ungrateful Syrian people overlooked this generosity and decided to revolt.

Assad was given a choice between exile in Saudi Arabia and exile in Qatar, so he decided to fight back.

It is generally agreed that the Syrian revolution started with peaceful demonstrations against the government, but some people said that those demonstrations were actually filmed on special sets that were built for this purpose in Qatar.

However, some people argued that the people saying that the demonstrations were filmed on set in Qatar were themselves saying this on special sets built in Iran.

The people making those accusations were accused of making those statements on special sets built in Turkey.

This may help explain why Syria is known for its historic dramas which are filmed on set.

The US and its Western allies didn’t know how to react to the Syrian revolt, with opinions split between those who said Assad should step down and others who thought he should step aside.

This debate continued to plague American policy towards Syria, and President Obama decided to get around this by simultaneously arming and not arming the Syrian rebels, arguing that at least one of those policies will work.

The policy was so clever that President Obama was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2009. (3 years ahead of applying his genuine policy of woshy washy…)

And thus ends our comprehensive history of the Arab Spring.

If you’re reading this in the West or the Gulf, you’re probably missing the sections about Yemen and Bahrain but that’s only because they are inconvenient for American and Saudi leaders.

You can find out more by searching for the word ‘truth’ on the internet, an endeavor that would make you totally paranoid.

– See more at: http://www.karlremarks.com/2014/02/a-short-pre-emptive-history-of-arab.html#sthash.QPWC86w1.dpuf


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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