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Rabid mob who stormed the US Capitol. They were also armed with a portable and potent weapon: flags of hatred and discrimination

VEXILLOLOGY OF HATE.

By Anne Quito & Amanda Shendruk January 7, 2021. From Quartz

There were large election banners, battle colors from the American Civil War, neo-Nazi flare, Christian symbols, and a smattering of national and state flags.

Seen as a whole, they serve as a twisted ideological quilt for those who believe that the US election was stolen from incumbent president Donald Trump.

Trump supporters breach the US Capitol
A Trump supporter parades a Confederate flag at the US Capitol.

Of the various flags paraded around the seat of the US legislative branch, the most incendiary was a battle pennant from the Confederate army. Widely appropriated by white supremacists as a hate symbol, the “Southern Cross” (center row and middle flag) never has been paraded public inside the Capitol before, historians point out

“It’s an outright affront to the government in its entirety,” says Antaeus Edelsohn, a University of Richmond law student and vexillology enthusiast.

A sampling of flags seen at the Capitol insurrection

QUARTZ. Painful parade.

The ensign featuring St. Andrew’s cross with 11 stars was designed to identify Confederate soldiers through the mist, fog, and gunpowder in the battlefields, Edelsohn says. “Its purpose is specifically to stand out and say ‘we are against the United States; we are against the union.’”

Laura Scofield, a graphic designer and member of the North American Vexillological Association, contends that flags are “the most powerful artifact ever designed.”

Graphic marks, she explains, instantly gain emotional weight when emblazoned on a piece of cloth. “They’re powerful because they’re visible symbols of our identity. More than a cardboard sign, flags are dynamic. They communicate ideas quickly especially when hoisted to the heavens.”

This contributes to the effect of a bigger, more unified rally behind a cause.

https://cms.qz.com/embed-sandbox/1953366/twitter.com/TheDanaWeiss/status/1346922606864326663

Surveying the footage, artist-activist Mirko Ilić recognized several neo-Nazi symbols in the crowd. As curator of the Tolerance Project and a scholar on white supremacist iconography, he says watching the mayhem at the Capitol felt a bit like déjà vu.

“This is how things started in Yugoslavia,” notes Ilić, who was born in the former socialist republic. White supremacists cling to fascist iconography because Hitler’s army demonstrated how potent flags can be when seen en masse, he explains.

“In my opinion, branding was truly invented by Nazi Germany. It was total design. We have to be vigilant about these symbols because they’re like tea leaves. You can see the future.”

We took a closer look at the array of flags seen in this AFP photograph by Roberto Schmidt, which we obtained via Getty Images:https://things.qz.com/2021/hate-flags/index.html

And that’s just a small sampling of the flags on display. For more detail on what we spotted in coverage of the insurrection, read on.

America First flag

Trump’s succinctly articulated foreign policy stance, immortalized in his 2016 inauguration speech, has been adopted by a” band of white nationalists and far-right activists spearheaded by 22-year old political commentator Nick Fuentes. They identify as “Groypers” or “America First boys”

Betsy Ross flag (1776)

An early version of the US flag, it has a circle of 13 stars in the corner, representing colonies that fought for independence during the American Revolution. Though not strictly a white supremacist symbol, it has been used by some extremist groups as an emblem of a more traditional (read: white and male-dominated) America.

A police officer detains a pro-Trump protester as mobs storm the U.S. Capitol, during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 U.S. presidential election results by the U.S. Congress, at the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, U.S, January 6, 2021.
A Betsy Ross flag

Calvin peeing on Biden

This flag was adapted from a decal featuring a bastardized version of the character Calvin, from the Calvin and Hobbes comic strip by Bill Watterson.

Come and Take It flag (1835)

symbol of defiance created by a band of Texans who resisted Mexican forces in 1835, the flag features a slogan that has been co-opted by gun rights activists, abortion rights advocates, marijuana enthusiasts, and even McDonald’s. But the phrase was originally a battlecry for Texan independence.

Culpeper Minutemen (1775)

This flag was used by militias around the town of Culpeper, Virginia, during the American revolution, when “minutemen” (troops ready for duty in “a minute’s warning”) got their name. The group’s rattlesnake flag bear the words “ “Liberty or Death” and “Don’t Tread on Me

Gadsen flag (1777)

The yellow flag, with a coiled rattlesnake and the words “Don’t Tread on Me,” has origins before the American Revolution, but has recently been used by the tea party movement, militia groups, and even in sports branding. Now, the flag tends to symbolize opposition to restrictions and government oppression.

A man walks with a Gadsden and American flags outside the U.S. Capitol, a day after supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump occupied the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, U.S. January 7, 2021. REUTERS/Erin Scott
A Gadsden flag

Ichthys

This symbol, used by ancient Christians, has been adopted by several conservative, religious groups supporting Trump. (Several protestors also held up a Trumpian pirate flag with the words “Jesus is My Savior, Trump is My President.”)

QAnon

Flags bearing the capital letter Q signal believers of the discredited far-right conspiracy theory that a group of Satan worshipers are plotting to take down Donald Trump.

Republic of Kekistan flag

This flag first appeared in 4 Chan in 2017, as a symbol for the made-up sect who worship Kek, the ancient Egyptian deity of darkness.

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump gather in Washington
Battle banners

South Carolina Navy ensign (1778)

Used by South Carolinian naval fleets during the American Revolution and the Civil War, it features a rattlesnake against a field of 13 stripes.

Stop the Steal flag

This flag features the battle cry for the right-wing conspiracy theory that falsely posits that there was widespread fraud during the 2020 US presidential election.

Thin blue line flag (1922)

For some, the black and white US flag with a blue line through the center is a symbol of police solidarity. However, it has also been flown by white supremacists at gatherings like the 2017 “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville.

Three Percenters flag (2008)

The Three Percenters are an American-Canadian faction described by the Anti-Defamation League  as “anti-government extremists who are part of the militia movement.”

Their name is derived from the unproven claim that only 3% of Americans fought for independence during the American Revolution. Their flag is similar to the Betsy Ross flag, with III (the Roman numeral for three) in the middle of the circle of stars.

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump gather in front of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, U.S. January 6, 2021.
A modern Three Percenter flag flies beside the Colonial-era Betsy Ross.

Trump 2020 banners

An enormous Trump campaign banner was the most visible flag draped in front of the US Capitol. Several protestors also held up Trump 2024 flags, alluding to Trump’s suggestion that he may run for office again.

Trump Rambo flag

“No man, no woman, no commie can stump him.” A cheesy incarnation of Trump as Vietnam vet John Rambo, from the movie franchise starring Sylvester Stallone, this flag was a common fixture at Trump rallies during the US presidential campaign.

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump gather in front of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, U.S. January 6, 2021. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Alt-Right Rambo.

Unleash the Kraken

This is a reference to a threat by Sidney Powell, a member of the Trump legal team contesting the results of the US election. She was citing a line from the movie Clash of the Titans, where Zeus orders a monstrous a giant squid to destroy the city of Argo.

Upside down American flag

The US Flag Code stipulates that this can only be used in cases of “dire distress and extreme danger to life or property.”

US Marine Corps standard flag (1939)

Several protestors hoisted the red pennant of the US Marine Corps. A majority of military veterans voted for Trump, but his popularity among younger, active-duty personnel dipped during the last election cycle, according to a recent poll.

VDare/Lion Guards of Trump (2016)

This is the banner for an anti-immigration alt-right site founded by British-born columnist Peter Brimelow

Its lion motif is traced back to a quote from Benito Mussolini that Trump tweeted in 2016. It also has been used by the Lion Guard, a civilian group formed to protect Trump and his supporters.

Virginia confederate battle flag (1861)

This battle pennant first used by Confederate general Robert E. Lee’s troops in northern Virginia is often mistaken as the official flag of the pro-slavery Confederacy (it wasn’t).

The Ku Klux Klan began using it as a symbol in the 1940s. The state of Mississippi removed it from its official state flag in 2020.

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump demonstrate on the second floor of the U.S. Capitol near the entrance to the Senate after bre?ching security defenses, in Washington, U.S., January 6, 2021.
A mix of flags inside the capitol building.

Miscellaneous flags

LGBTQ+ AND PRIDE FLAGS

“Gays for Trump” showed up at the Capitol. Despite the president’s numerous attacks against the LGBTQ+ community, gay support for the Republican agenda doubled from 2016 to 2020.

COUNTRY FLAGS

The flags of Canada, Cuba, Georgia, India, Israel, South Korea, and South Vietnam were spotted in the mob. It’s unclear why many of these flags appeared, though a number of the white supremacist and militia groups that were present have international chapters. For example, the presence of the Canadian flag could have been because the white nationalist group the Proud Boys was founded by a Canadian.

STATE FLAGS

Georgia, Maryland, Texas: Several state flags were present. There was perhaps some confusion about the official state flag of Georgia, as the symbol of the Republic of Georgia. also was spotted on the scene.

https://cms.qz.com/embed-sandbox/1953366/twitter.com/eoinburgin/status/1346946053082378245

Karen K. Ho contributed research to this story.

Are you aware of a few of your idiosyncrasies?

We behave according to the biases we accumulated from our environment. Idiosyncrasies are the norm in life. Even when we become conscious of a few of our biases, it is doubtful that we get the necessary stamina to change.

We’re all biased species. It becomes an unconscious behavior. Our experiences (and idee-fixe in our surrounding) shape who we are.

The perception of our race, ethnicity, gender, height, weight, sexual orientation, place of birth, and other factors impact the lens with which we view the world.

How can we recognize and acknowledge our own biases? Does identifying our kinds of biases (like affinity bias, halo bias, perception bias, and confirmation bias) make a difference in our daily decisions or change our viewpoints?

It is important to make a distinction between 3 broadly different approaches: objective, polemic, and deceptive. This distinction isn’t metaphysical. It’s a question of intent.

In order to discriminate among fake news, facts, objective statement, value judgment… we require vast general knowledge in many fields of study and apply our experimental mind on each subject matter. Otherwise, people will offer the excuse of “common sense” to absolve their laziness in the mind

It is Not an easy endeavor that should span a lifetime and be conducted with the passion of learning, credibility, fairness in treating readers…

Note: I usually edit any piece in my own style and add comments.

Biases All the Way Down, Some Biases are More Troublesome Than Others

danielwalldammit posted on wordpess.com

When I listen to people complaining about indoctrination in the schools or dismissing perfectly sound journalism by chanting the mantra “fake news,” I’m always struck by the hopelessness of trying to reason with them.

Phrases like “just the facts” spill from their mouths, their keyboards, and their keypads quite often, and not a few of them are happy to remind us that facts do not care about our feelings.

These phrases do not usually convey skepticism.

They do not challenge us to provide evidence or compelling reason. Instead, they signal an absolute barrier to any hope of meaningful communication.

These phrases did not become popular in the American political vocabulary because they help to explain the problem with erroneous or dishonest journalism.

Nor have these phrases been generally used to correct flawed textbooks or abusive teachers.

As they are commonly used in America today, these phrases consistently provide thoughtless people with a shield against unwelcome information.

As I listen to such folks talk, or read anything they write, I can’t help thinking those who find nothing but bias in academia or mainstream news are often the same folks who speak of objectivity in terms of the most naive realism.

They think Facticity is part of their cultural capital, they own it, and so they invoke it freely in encounters with others.

Ask these people what it means to do a good job as a teacher or a journalist, a documentary film-maker, etc. and they will describe an absolute devotion to facts coupled with a complete absence of subjectivity.

They have few thoughts as to how that works, but the goal seems pretty obvious to them.

If pressed, some might concede that such an account of any given subject never really happens, but they are likely to insist that it should be an ideal of sorts, a goal to which one ought to aspire.

They don’t understand that the ideal itself isn’t even coherent. You cannot describe a fact without injecting yourself into the description.

Even the facts you choose to relate reflect a choice and a value statement about what is and what is not important in a story. So, does the language you use to describe those facts, and of course the conclusions you draw from whatever you take to be the settled facts of a story also reflect all sorts of choices about what lessons might be worth learning from the world around us.

We never actually get a purely factual account of anything; we can’t even conceive of it in the abstract, because the most rigorous visions of evidence-based reasoning are themselves saturated with value judgements and personal biases.

If objectivity is meaningful at all, it is as a element in relation to subjectivity, (or perhaps inter-subjectivity), not as a pair of alternatives from which we choose. We can speak of an object only in relation to a subject. To imagine the one without the other is to indulge in fiction.

To those who suppose this fictional objectivity is reality, I suppose it is the rhetorical equivalent to reality television, a pretense to veracity offered with a smirk and wink even as any claims to meet that standard unravels unravels around us.

This naive realism goes hand in hand with a pan-partisanship in the consumption of information.

As nobody ever actually meets these impossible standards of objectivity, it provides a ready excuse to dismiss any information one doesn’t wish to hear.

You can always pick apart the choices other people make when they try to state facts. You can quibble over the language they use to express themselves or ask why they think this fact here is important and not that one there? Nobody meets the standard in actual practice, so each and every source of information comes ready-made with all manner of excuses for rejecting it. One has only to make exceptions for those one wishes to keep after all. If those exceptions seem selective, well then, by what standard would anyone presume to make such a judgement?

All of this leaves us with is a sense of bias which provides license for more of the same, and a way of talking about bias that reduces everyone and every approach to information to the level of open partisanship and nothing but partisanship.

All biases are equal in this mindset, because those adopting it do not really think about how one sorts a reasonable account of any given subject from a foolish one. They needn’t accept the authority (or the credibility) of a judge, or a scholar, or a journalist, because they can find evidence of a personal point of view in each.

This flattening of critical merit makes every controversy into a sort of intellectual playground, a range of possibilities all of which possess equal intellectual merit. It puts every couch-potato responding to a 3-minute news segment on Covid19 right on par with a scientist who has studied infectious diseases throughout her career. It empowers the Dunning-Krueger effect, in effect, by denying that there is any meaningful difference in knowledge to begin with.

I keep coming back to this, not because the problem is conceptually interesting, but because I find myself talking to so many people who seem to live in this mindset. They know what sources they like, and they know which sources they cannot be bothered with, but their own explanations boil down to a kind of unacknowledged voluntarism. Intellectual rigor of any kind simply does not enter into this mindset, because every actual stance is, for them rooted in pure personal bias.

A professional historian writing about World War II might as well be their friend Frank who told them about a thing he saw once in a movie. A journalist summarizing countless hours of research enjoys no more credibility than the first thought that jumps into their own head upon hearing the story.

A medical doctor talking about a global pandemic is easily trumped by a blog post detailing an elaborate conspiracy theory. These same people are happy to sing the praises of objectivity, and in particular to use high standards as a foil against their enemies, but in practice, their mental life is a playground of choices made on thin pretexts. That is all they hear from others; it is all they produce themselves.

I find myself struggling to produce a simple account of objectivity and bias, one which affirms neither this naive realism nor this practical pan-partisanship.

If I am thinking about bias in the presentation of information, and I am, I usually want to make a distinction between 3 broadly different approaches, objective, polemic, and deceptive. This distinction isn’t metaphysical. It’s a question of intent.

When I refer to an account as objective, I do not mean to suggest that its author has achieved some miraculous account devoid of any personal bias. What I mean in such cases, is that the author has made an effort to express the relevant facts of the story, and perhaps to provide an account of the different positions others have taken on the subject.

I will still have questions about the author’s specific choices, the accuracy of their descriptions, and if I know something about the subject, I am likely to sense bias creeping into their narratives. When I call it ‘objective’, it is because I can still see a few objective information creeping through the haze of personal bias, and because I perceive the author’s goal as being rooted in the objective features of the story. Whatever their personal views, there is something about the facts of the matter that has their interest. If they are doing their job right, it will have mine as well.

If I am ever tempted to dismiss the prospect of an objective account as a result of the many subjectivities that always seem to accompany them, I have only to consider some of the alternatives.

There is a world of difference between someone who is trying to tell a story based on the facts as they understand them, and someone for whom a story is solely an instrument of their own personal agenda. While bias might count as failure in the former case, in the latter, that bias is precisely the point.

If ever we forget the merits of an objective account, their absence is certainly noticed whenever we encounter polemic work.

An author or speaker whose primary goal is the advancement of a partisan view tells a very different story than one who is trying to give us an objective account. The facts they elect to provide are not merely shaded by personal bias, they are explicitly chosen on that basis.

One literally doesn’t get any information that doesn’t help the polemicist build his case. His language too is chosen for the purpose of expressing a clear stance on the subject in question. We don’t expect of such writers that they will spend a lot of time on things that don’t facilitate their own argument. To do so would be setting ourselves up for disappointment.

Let’s take for example the dropping of the atomic bomb on Japan at the end of WWII. I have plenty of textbooks that provide a basic and brief account of this event. One of the major controversies of this story is the question of whether or not doing so was necessary and/or justified in any sense by the circumstances facing the allies near the end of that war.

Any author trying to tell me that story will normally provide some account of the reasons for dropping the bomb, and in doing so, they are likely to show some sense of their own take on that controversial subject They will cover the facts most relevant to their position on the subject, and they will likely describe them in language that suggests some degree of their own sense as to whether or not the decision was sound.

Some authors try to address the controversy by providing an account of the controversy itself, telling us what different people have said about the question over the years. In such cases, it would not be unreasonable to expect they will do a better job of accounting for those positions they agree with than the ones they do not agree with.

All of which is very different from reading a text in which an author takes a stand on that very question. You can find such readings. You can find people who will tell you the decision was absolutely appropriate, and they will make the case as to why.

Others will describe it as an atrocity, and they too will provide an argument as to why that is the case.

In neither of these instances would one expect the polemicist to spend a great deal of time covering facts which don’t help their case. If they do, it will only be to show how their position deals with these facts after all, and so their account of these seemingly neutral features of the story will of course be largely an exercise in stretching a specific viewpoint to cover the facts in question.

None of this is a terrible thing. There is a place for polemics in human communication. My point is simply that a polemic is very different from an attempt at an objective account.

If bias is a bug in the former; it is a feature of the latter, a genuine benefit. If polemic writing is well done, it leaves us with a clear vision of the viewpoint expressed within it. It is a good thing, but it is a different kind of than we get from those trying to write a more thorough and objective account.

(How about the US didn’t want Stalin to occupy all of Korea before Japan ceasefire? Japan had to surrender and stop Russia advances)

Whatever the goals of a writer or a speaker, whether it be polemic or objective, we can also distinguish between those who show a certain respect for truth and reason and those who are consciously deceptive about such matters.

Even the most strident of polemicists is perfectly capable of telling the truth as she understands it and using reasoning that is at least plausible rather than fallacious.

On the other hand, some people are just bad actors: Not only do they make a conscious choice to advance a single point of view; they are willing to deceive to us in the service of that point of view. Their account of the facts will contain not mere errors but conscious lies, and their reasoning will include deliberate cases of misdirection.

Such people are not merely influenced by personal values and personal agendas; they operate free of any moral or intellectual restraint. Lest we forget that objectivity matters, or give up on it altogether, an encounter with such a deceitful soul ought to remind us that facts matter after all, and so does sound reasoning.

I really do not mean to advocate some naive objective metaphysics, but I am sure some folks will say the way I have tried to qualify my use of the term here is inadequate, but this post isn’t really meant to outline an epistemological theory.

This post is mean to describe some differences in communicative practice. The need to do so is motivated less by abstract philosophical questions than a general sense that it is becoming increasingly difficult to maintain any standards of honesty or intellectual rigor in public discourse.

The problem isn’t just that some people cannot tell the difference between sound journalism and internet gossip; it is that such people increasingly dominate our public discourse and they are increasingly able to obscure such distinctions for purposes of public policy.

Much of their ability to do so lies in their ability to find personal or political bias in even the most professional of publications (whether scholarly or journalistic).

My point here is not to suggest that some people are above personal bias; it is calling attention to the different ways in which bias enters into the work of public media.

For some people bias is a problem they can never really seem to escape.

For others, bias is precisely the point.

For some, it is the only point.

Who is Shirley Chisholm?

“I ran because most people thought the country was not ready for a black candidate, not ready for a woman candidate. Someday, it was time in 1972 to make that someday come,” she told an interviewer at the time

Before Hillary Clinton. And before Obama. there was Shirley Chisholm

Decades before Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton, there was Shirley Chisholm

“If they don’t give you a seat at the table, bring a folding chair.”

“Tremendous amounts of talent are lost to our society just because that talent wears a skirt.

“The emotional, sexual, and psychological stereotyping of females begins when the doctor says, ‘It’s a girl’.”

“What do we want? What does any human being want? Take away an accident of pigmentation of a thin layer of our outer skin and there is no difference between me and anyone else.”

Forty-four years ago this week, Shirley Chisholm made history as she announced her candidacy for the White House. Her bid for the top job was short lived, but the symbolism is as powerful today as it was then.

Marj Henningsen  shared this link
Robert Reid-Pharr via The Feminist WireFebruary 6, 2016

BBC Newsbbc.com

She was a pioneer for her generation, a woman of many firsts – the first African American congresswoman. The first African American to run for president. The first woman to run for president.

“She paved the way for me to be able to set foot on Capitol Hill,” says 22 year-old Kimaya Davis, who works for a congressional committee.

Davis is black and secured her job after an internship with the Congressional Black Caucus.

Founded by Shirley Chisholm, the Caucus represents black members of Congress.

“It’s because of her that I was able to get that internship – it helps young black students. A lot of kids like me, we don’t have family connections and privilege.”

To those who know about her, Shirley Chisholm is more than a role model, she’s an icon and a trailblazer who deserves greater credit and attention than history afforded her.

Despite her many achievements Chisholm is not a household name in the US.

“She was well known in the late 1960s and 1970s, but if you don’t come from that era, it’s easy to be forgotten,” said Ky Ekinci, a social entrepreneur from Florida’s Palm Coast.

A few months ago, Ekinci organised the inaugural Shirley Chisholm Day. Around 50 people in the area met to celebrate her life.

His goal was to get many of the younger people in the Palm Coast area, where Chisholm retired and spent her final years, to learn about her.

He created a hashtag, #IKnowNow, to spread the word further afield, tweeting out bite-size facts about Chisholm.

Born in 1924 in Brooklyn, New York, Shirley Chisholm, spent some of her childhood years living with her grandmother in Barbados, before returning to her parents in New York to complete her education.

After qualifying as a teacher she worked in childcare, where she developed an interest in politics. She served in the New York state assembly, then made history in 1968, becoming the first African American woman elected to the US Congress.

Shirley Chisholm wisdom

“In the end, anti-black, anti-female, and all forms of discrimination are equivalent to the same thing – anti-humanism.”

Charles Rangel speaks to Witness about Shirley Chisholm

“I have no intention of just sitting quietly and observing. I intend to speak out immediately in order to focus on the nation’s problems,” Chisholm said of her new role.

Her victory, against the backdrop of the civil rights era, was a huge milestone, but with it came challenges.

“Can you imagine being a woman, and black in congress then?” says Congresswoman Barbara Lee, who represents the 13th District of California and is one of 35 African-American women who has served in Congress to date.

The first black woman, and the second ever female on the influential rules committee in Congress, she shattered a lot of glass ceilings, says Lee.

“Some of the men in Congress did not respect her, she just stood out and they didn’t get her. But she wouldn’t back down. She didn’t go along to get along, she went to change things.”

This was demonstrated in the sort of legislation Ms Chisholm worked on as a congresswoman, fighting for the underprivileged and minority groups.

She championed a bill to ensure domestic workers received benefits, was an advocate for improved access to education, and fought for the rights of immigrants.

She sponsored a bill to expand childcare for women, supported the national school lunch bill and helped establish the national commission on consumer protection and product safety.

Shirley Chisholm also worked tirelessly to expand the government-funded food stamps programme so it was available in every state, and was instrumental in setting up an additional scheme, The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (Wic), which provided support for pregnant women

In politics, Chisholm found her gender a particular setback, “I met more discrimination as a woman than for being black. Men are men,” she once said.

She had guts, and she made people believe that they too can be someone, that we are equal, that gender doesn’t mean you can’t achieve the highest office of government,” her goddaughter Marya Boseley says.

That desire to break boundaries was what drove Shirley Chisholm to make a run for president in 1972, seeking the Democratic nomination a mere three years after she became a congresswoman.

Ms Chisholm, whose slogan was “Unbought and Unbossed,” said she never expected to win but hoped her candidacy would “change the face and future of American politics”.

“I stand before you today, to repudiate the ridiculous notion that the American people will Not vote for qualified candidates, simply because he is not white or because she is not a male,” she told supporters as she launched her campaign.

“I do not believe that in 1972, the great majority of Americans will continue to harbour such narrow and petty prejudice.”

Congresswoman Lee first met Shirley Chisholm during her presidential race, and ended up volunteering for her. “She spoke to us in Spanish,” she recalls.

“Then when I said I wanted to work for her she took me to task and made me register to vote first. She told me if I wanted to shake things up, I better get involved in politics.”

The campaign wasn’t easy – Shirley Chisholm survived several assassination attempts and sued to ensure she was included in the televised debates.

She made it as far as the Democratic convention, losing out on the nomination to George McGovern, but leaving a lasting impression.

She served 7 terms in Congress, retiring in 1982, after which she returned to teaching.

She died in 2005, at the age of 80.

Despite her many achievements, those close to her say she never received the place in history she deserved.

“People are ignorant to history,” says Bosely who is 47. “When I was growing up black history was prevalent in schools and now it’s not.”

Congresswoman Lee agrees education around her legacy is lacking, “especially as we are still dealing with many issues as it relates to the inclusion of African Americans in society.”

Lee successfully lobbied for a painting of Shirley Chisholm to be hung in Congress, and for a stamp to be released in her honour.

And, in November of last year, Chisholm was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

“There are people in our country’s history who don’t look left or right – they just look straight ahead. Shirley Chisholm was one of those people,” President Obama told the gathered audience at the White House as he presented her award posthumously.

“Shirley Chisholm’s example transcends her life. And when asked how she’d like to be remembered, she had an answer: ‘I’d like them to say that Shirley Chisholm had guts.’ 

And I’m proud to say it: Shirley Chisholm had guts.”

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“We read and rebut their vile crap so you won’t have to!”

What a difference a day can make in Idiot America, eh?

Only a little more than one day ago, the entire Judenpresse Armada was blasting holes in the hull of the USS Trump.

His debate performance was a “national embarrassment,” (they) screamed. He refuses to denounce “White Supremacists, ” (they) wailed.

He’s responsible for the deaths of over 200,000 Americans, they libeled. The blistering broadsides got so hot that even a number of ostensibly pro-Trump Republican Senators (Mitch McConnell, Tim Scott, Lindsey Graham et al) — when pressed by the Marxist media — quickly wet their pants and dutifully distanced themselves from the pro-Trump “Proud Boys.”

Their implied mild criticism of Trump eventually compelled the President himself to condemn “White Supremacism .”

Smelling blood in the water, the Deep State – Democrat complex grew bolder by the hour. Demands for adding a debate microphone mute button (aimed at taming Trump) saturated the news. (here)

The fake Stupid-19 “second wave” scare was being hyped (here) — timed, of course, for the coming election — the implication being that it was Trump’s failure.

Incoming fire was also directed at First Lady Melania Trump — in the form of a just-released audio tape of her dropping “the F word” over her frustration with being relegated to White House Christmas decorator while her efforts to help refugees were ignored by the media. (here)

And when even the generally objective Rasmussen Poll showed that a few percentage points of the dumb-as-dirt normies of the mushy malleable middle were starting to pull away from Trump — it became clear that Election 2020 was by no means a re-election lock for him.

The closing days of September and early October were not good for Team Trump.

And now, in a Covid minute — the big guns of the Piranha Press have fallen silent while Trump regroups. How convenient.

The big guns of the Judenpresse Armada have temporarily ceased firing as the subject instantly changes to Trump’s sudden “illness.”

We have mixed feelings about this.

On the one hand, The Trumps’ sudden “illness” can only add credibility to an illusion that at The Anti-New York Times have worked so hard to shatter — at the cost of having our prior website pulled down by European authorities due to “Covid disinformation (hosting company was based in Holland). 

But then again, there’s that age-old ethical question about “ends justifying the means.”

We are, after all, at war with dirty, lying, thieving, mass-murdering, child raping, Globalist scum here. Is it wrong to hoist them on their own petard (blow them up with their own bomb?) 

So entrenched is the Stupid-19 hoax, that no major media outlet or prominent Demonrat would dare to put forth a “conspiracy theory” ™ suggesting that the Trumps are faking it.

Headline: NBC News (October 2, 2020)

Biden Pulling All Negative Ads

“A Biden campaign official confirmed to NBC News that the campaign is pulling all of its negative advertising from their rotation of paid media. The news comes as the president is transported to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center as a precautionary measure.”

Communist film-maker Michael Moore does not have the limitations that journalists and politicians do. He spoke freely:

“Democrats, liberals, the media and others have always been wrong to simply treat him as a buffoon and a dummy and a jackass.

Yes, he is all those things. But he’s also canny. He’s clever. He outfoxed Comey. He outfoxed Mueller. He outfoxed 20 Republicans in the GOP primary and then did the same to the Democrats, winning the White House despite receiving fewer votes than his opponent.

He’s an evil genius and I raise the possibility of him lying about having Covid-19 to prepare us and counteract his game.  He knows being sick tends to gain one sympathy. He’s not above weaponizing this.”

The Judenpresse guns may have pulled back as the President “recovers” — but they will begin firing again in a week or two.

Trump will use this truce period to stop the bleeding and to regroup — before unloading his own barrage during the final two weeks of October.

By that time, the fake furor over Trump’s debating style and the manufactured controversy over his tolerance of “The Proud Boys” will be very difficult for the Left to resurrect.

And forget about (them) attacking a 74-year old “survivor” of Stupid-19 for being responsible for the scamdemic. Trump will have too much moral authority on the subject by then.

It’s a shitty, degrading and pathetic way to win an election. But don’t hate the player; hate the game. That being said, one has got to question if a nation now so deeply afflicted by paralyzing stupidity and stark-raving madness is even salvageable at this point — regardless of what Trump and Q Anon may or may not do to crush the Deep State in Term 2.

1. For the past 5 years, Communist film maker Michael Moore has been trying to warn Libtards not to underestimate Trump’s high-level strategic deception. //

2. Ain’t a darn thing wrong with him. //

3. Bewildered and bamboozled by countless hours of Fake News and years of half-ass “education,” the normie voters of the mushy middle can only be won over by maneuver and manipulation. It’s sad, but true.

Boobus Americanus 1: I read in the New York Times today that Trump just checked-in to Walter Reed Hospital.

Boobus Americanus 2: Though I’m voting for Biden, it’s hard to speak ill of someone who has just contracted this horrible disease.
*
St. Sugar: No comment.

Editor: Yes. Let Boobus hold his fire. Trump’s sympathy play is already working like a charm.

Jews Are Enabling The Slaughter Of Armenian Christians In Nagorno-Karabakh

Note: For over a century, each time Orthodox Russia launch an expansion war against the Ottoman Empire, The Christian Armenians in Turkey and by the borders with Russia, would ally and support the Russian troops. Obviously, the Ottoman Empire would counter by launching pogroms activities on the Armenians.

In WWI, Germany planned the transfer of the Armenians far away from the Russian front. The new “secular” Turks who deposed the Ottoman Sultan, and Caliph of the Muslim Sunnis, turned toward the Sunni Kurds to do the dirty work of the transfer of thousands of Armenians.

With the rights to loot and acquire Armenian properties, the mercenary Kurds and under Turkish and German officers conducted the massacre and the transfer toward Syria, mainly to Aleppo and Deir el Zour.

The Syrians welcome the Armenian refugees in camps and allowed them to move outside the camps and find work and jobs around the villages and cities. The Outside countries didn’t lend any financial or health support to the thousands of Armenian refugees.

That is why the Kurds are currently majority in east and south Turkey and being persecuted by Erdogan in order Not to claim any kinds of autonomy.

Eric Striker. Oct 15, 2020

The spiraling conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the disputed province of Nagorno-Karabakh has suddenly intensified. 

Nagorno-Karabakh is technically part of Azerbaijan, but its population is 99% Armenian Christian and has its own local military, which is backed by the Armenian state.

(In 1994, the Armenians extended this territory and now the Azeri claim to recapture lost lands.)

The Azeri government seeks to assert full control over the region and violently evict its native population. 

The alliances in the war are counter-intuitive.

Azerbaijan is majority Shia Muslim and a former Soviet Republic, but it is controlled by a Jewish billionaire class which is backed by Turkey, Israel and even Al Qaeda

Armenia on the other hand is an ancient Christian civilization. Since the 1990s, Iran, despite being Shia as well, has served as an aggressive defender of the Armenian people.

During the current conflict, the Iranians have been less gung-ho out of fear that the United States and Israel could use its massive Azeri population in the provinces close to Azerbaijan, about 25% of the country — to cause chaos and civil strife while they are still recovering from sanctions. 

Iran and Russia still would like to side with the Armenians and are supplying them weapons (as Turkey and Israel are shipping sophisticated weapons to Azerbaijan).

But Russia and Iran are eager to avoid a war in the area and are currently trying to broker a diplomatic arrangement with both sides.

So far, these truces have failed because a victory war of the Azeri army is at hand. (The Azeri army has now captured the strategic high village of Sushi with about 4 thousands Armenians, and 10 km from the Capital Strepanachek and cutting off the only land route to the Armenian State)

Jewish Support For Murdering Christians

The Azeri military’s war crimes against Armenian Christians have not attracted much in the way of bad publicity in the English-speaking world, likely due to the country’s close ties to international Jewry.

Last week, Azerbaijan deliberately bombed the centuries old Ghazanchetsots Cathedral.

When Russian journalists arrived to report on the damage, the Azeri military launched another barrage of shells, critically injuring one journalist.

Scores of civilians have also been targeted and killed on the Armenian side. 

Turkey is singled out as being the primary regional instigator in this Southern Caucus war, but Israel’s support for Azerbaijan is arguably more substantial.

The state of Israel provides 60% of Azerbaijan’s weapons, and its high tech arms, such as IAI Harops (“suicide drones”), have given the Azeri military a unique strategic edge that the Armenians have no counter to.

International investigators have also uncovered evidence that the Azeri’s are using Israeli M095 DPICM cluster munitions — which are illegal under international law — to kill and maim non-combatants.  

An Israeli court recently struck down a lawsuit supported by the country’s small Armenian community, complaining that weapons manufactured in Israel were implicated in crimes against humanity.

Lawyers provided evidence showing that Israel was secretly airlifting weapons to Azerbaijan just days before the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict erupted, a shocking revelation left out of most Western reporting on the subject.

The Zionist regime has vowed to continue selling billions of dollars in arms to the Azerbaijan government. 

How To Lobby America

The Trump administration has shown more interest in supporting Azerbaijan than any government before it, largely as a passive act of harassment against Iran.

So far, $100 million dollars in aid have been dispatched to the country, but Washington has not been deeply involved in the current unfolding conflict. 

The Azeri government’s lobbying tactic in the run up to this war has been to directly curry favor with American Jewry.

In March, it became the first Muslim country to give a speech at AIPAC. 

Last July, Armenians in Los Angeles protesting against Azerbaijan’s aggression were selectively charged with “hate crimes.”

Hate crimes charges in America are generally reserved for politically disfavored ethnic groups who clash with favored ones.

Last week, Azeri ambassador Elin Suleymanov met with the Jewish Institute for National Security of America (JINSA) in an attempt to get Washington to increase support for his country’s war effort.  

Armenians, whose population massively outnumbers Azeris in the United States and is relatively wealthy, have attempted to formally petitioned members of Congress to condemn Azerbaijan and Turkey.

They have, on the surface, found success. 

Multiple high profile congressmen have made statements verbally opposing Azeri and Turkish aggression.

A letter addressed to Mike Pompeo calling for the US to end aid to Azerbaijan was sent, but no actually policies or bills have been put forward. 

The Azeri Jew-focused gambit has objectively been far more effective.

The Muslim majority state’s agenda is uncritically promoted in conservative media and the American public is kept ignorant of its barbaric behavior.  

Attempts to get the European Union and the US to sanction Turkey over its bellicose behaviors through Azerbaijan and beyond have amounted to nothing but talk

While Azerbaijan’s actions are being condemned by much of the world and only a handful of whimsical countries are overtly supporting their adventure (Pakistan, Israel, Turkey, Ukraine), their deep ties to world Jewry ensures that they will not stop until Iran, Russia and China massively increase pressure on them to do so.

Note 2: The famous singer late Armenian by origin Charles Aznavour threw many concerts in Israel in honor of the Jewish holocaust by the Nazis. As many other singers and bands and international leaders. The suckers.

Overwhelming power of prosecutors in US justice system.

When a kid commits a crime, the US justice system has a choice: prosecute to the full extent of the law, or take a step back and ask if saddling young people with criminal records is the right thing to do every time.

In this searching talk, Adam Foss, a prosecutor with the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office in Boston, makes his case for a reformed justice system that replaces wrath with opportunity, changing people’s lives for the better instead of ruining them

Patsy Z and TEDxSKE shared a link.

A prosecutor vision for a better justice systemted.com|By Adam Foss

Adam Foss. Juvenile justice reformer

By shifting his focus from incarceration to transforming lives, Adam Foss is reinventing the role of the criminal prosecutor. Full bio

The following are my opinions, and do not reflect the opinions or policies of any particular prosecutor’s office. 

I am a prosecutor. I believe in law and order. I am the adopted son of a police officer, a Marine and a hairdresser. 

I believe in accountability and that we should all be safe in our communities. I love my job and the people that do it. I just think that it’s our responsibility to do it better.

By a show of hands, how many of you, by the age of 25, had either acted up in school, went somewhere you were specifically told to stay out of, or drank alcohol before your legal age?  

How many of you shoplifted, tried an illegal drug or got into a physical fight, even with a sibling?

how many of you ever spent one day in jail for any of those decisions?

How many of you sitting here today think that you’re a danger to society or should be defined by those actions of youthful indiscretion?

When we talk about criminal justice reform, we often focus on a few things, and that’s what I want to talk to you about today.

But first I’m going to give you a confession on my part.

I went to law school to make money. I had no interest in being a public servant, I had no interest in criminal law, and I definitely didn’t think that I would ever be a prosecutor.

Near the end of my first year of law school, I got an internship in the Roxbury Division of Boston Municipal Court

I knew of Roxbury as an impoverished neighborhood in Boston, plagued by gun violence and drug crime.

My life and my legal career changed the first day of that internship. I walked into a courtroom, and I saw an auditorium of people who, one by one, would approach the front of that courtroom to say two words and two words only: “Not guilty.”

They were predominately black and brown. And then a judge, a defense attorney and a prosecutor would make life-altering decisions about that person without their input. They were predominately white.

As each person, one by one, approached the front of that courtroom, I couldn’t stop but think: How did they get here? I wanted to know their stories. And as the prosecutor read the facts of each case, I was thinking to myself, we could have predicted that. That seems so preventable… not because I was an expert in criminal law, but because it was common sense.

Over the course of the internship, I began to recognize people in the auditorium, not because they were criminal masterminds but because they were coming to us for help and we were sending them out without any.

My second year of law school I worked as a paralegal for a defense attorney, and in that experience I met many young men accused of murder. Even in our “worst,” I saw human stories.

And they all contained childhood trauma, victimization, poverty, loss, disengagement from school, early interaction with the police and the criminal justice system, all leading to a seat in a courtroom.

Those convicted of murder were condemned to die in prison, and it was during those meetings with those men that I couldn’t fathom why we would spend so much money to keep this one person in jail for the next 80 years when we could have reinvested it up front, and perhaps prevented the whole thing from happening in the first place.

My third year of law school, I defended people accused of small street crimes, mostly mentally ill, mostly homeless, mostly drug-addicted, all in need of help. They would come to us, and we would send them away without that help. 

They were in need of our assistance. But we weren’t giving them any. Prosecuted, adjudged and defended by people who knew nothing about them.

The staggering inefficiency is what drove me to criminal justice work. The unfairness of it all made me want to be a defender. The power dynamic that I came to understand made me become a prosecutor.

I don’t want to spend a lot of time talking about the problem. We know the criminal justice system needs reform, we know there are 2.3 million people in American jails and prisons, making us the most incarcerated nation on the planet.

We know there’s another 7 million people on probation or parole, we know that the criminal justice system disproportionately affects people of color, particularly poor people of color.

And we know there are system failures happening everywhere that bring people to our courtrooms. But what we do not discuss is how ill-equipped our prosecutors are to receive them.

When we talk about criminal justice reform, we, as a society, focus on three things. We complain, we tweet, we protest about the police, about sentencing laws and about prison. We rarely, if ever, talk about the prosecutor.

In the fall of 2009, a young man was arrested by the Boston Police Department. He was 18 years old, he was African American and he was a senior at a local public school. He had his sights set on college but his part-time, minimum-wage job wasn’t providing the financial opportunity he needed to enroll in school.

In a series of bad decisions, he stole 30 laptops from a store and sold them on the Internet. This led to his arrest and a criminal complaint of 30 felony charges. The potential jail time he faced is what stressed Christopher out the most. But what he had little understanding of was the impact a criminal record would have on his future.

I was standing in arraignments that day when Christopher’s case came across my desk. And at the risk of sounding dramatic, in that moment, I had Christopher’s life in my hands. 

I was 29 years old, a brand-new prosecutor, and I had little appreciation for how the decisions I would make would impact Christopher’s life. Christopher’s case was a serious one and it needed to be dealt with as such, but I didn’t think branding him a felon for the rest of his life was the right answer.

For the most part, prosecutors step onto the job with little appreciation of the impact of our decisions, regardless of our intent. Despite our broad discretion, we learn to avoid risk at all cost, rendering our discretion basically useless.

History has conditioned us to believe that somehow, the criminal justice system brings about accountability and improves public safety, despite evidence to the contrary.

We’re judged internally and externally by our convictions and our trial wins, so prosecutors aren’t really incentivized to be creative at our case dispositions, or to take risks on people we might not otherwise. We stick to an outdated method, counterproductive to achieving the very goal that we all want, and that’s safer communities.

Yet most prosecutors standing in my space would have arraigned Christopher. They have little appreciation for what we can do. Arraigning Christopher would give him a criminal record, making it harder for him to get a job, setting in motion a cycle that defines the failing criminal justice system today.

With a criminal record and without a job, Christopher would be unable to find employment, education or stable housing.

Without those protective factors in his life, Christopher would be more likely to commit further, more serious crime.

The more contact Christopher had with the criminal justice system, the more likely it would be that he would return again and again and again — all at tremendous social cost to his children, to his family and to his peers. And, ladies and gentlemen, it is a terrible public safety outcome for the rest of us.

When I came out of law school, I did the same thing as everybody else. I came out as a prosecutor expected to do justice, but I never learned what justice was in my classes — none of us do. None of us do.

And yet, prosecutors are the most powerful actors in the criminal justice system. Our power is virtually boundless.

In most cases, not the judge, not the police, not the legislature, not the mayor, not the governor, not the President can tell us how to prosecute our cases.

The decision to arraign Christopher and give him a criminal record was exclusively mine. I would choose whether to prosecute him for 30 felonies, for one felony, for a misdemeanor, or at all. I would choose whether to leverage Christopher into a plea deal or take the case to trial, and ultimately, I would be in a position to ask for Christopher to go to jail. 

These are decisions that prosecutors make every day unfettered, and we are unaware and untrained of the grave consequences of those decisions.

One night this past summer, I was at a small gathering of professional men of color from around the city. As I stood there stuffing free finger sandwiches into my mouth, as you do as public servant —  I noticed across the room, a young man waving and smiling at me and approaching me. 

And I recognized him, but I couldn’t place from where, and before I knew it, this young man was hugging me. And thanking me. “You cared about me, and you changed my life.” It was Christopher.

 I never arraigned Christopher. He never faced a judge or a jail, he never had a criminal record. Instead, I worked with Christopher; first on being accountable for his actions, and then, putting him in a position where he wouldn’t re-offend.

We recovered 75 percent of the computers that he sold and gave them back to Best Buy, and came up with a financial plan to repay for the computers we couldn’t recover. 

Christopher did community service. He wrote an essay reflecting on how this case could impact his future and that of the community. He applied to college, he obtained financial aid, and he went on to graduate from a four-year school.

After we finished hugging, I looked at his name tag, to learn that Christopher was the manager of a large bank in Boston. Christopher had accomplished — and making a lot more money than me —

He had accomplished all of this in the six years since I had first seen him in Roxbury Court. I can’t take credit for Christopher’s journey to success, but I certainly did my part to keep him on the path.

There are thousands of Christophers out there, some locked in our jails and prisons. We need thousands of prosecutors to recognize that and to protect them.

An employed Christopher is better for public safety than a condemned one. It’s a bigger win for all of us. In retrospect, the decision not to throw the book at Christopher makes perfect sense. When I saw him that first day in Roxbury Court, I didn’t see a criminal standing there. I saw myself — a young person in need of intervention.

As an individual caught selling a large quantity of drugs in my late teens, I knew firsthand the power of opportunity as opposed to the wrath of the criminal justice system. Along the way, with the help and guidance of my district attorney, my supervisor and judges, I learned the power of the prosecutor to change lives instead of ruining them.

And that’s how we do it in Boston. We helped a woman who was arrested for stealing groceries to feed her kids get a job.

Instead of putting an abused teenager in adult jail for punching another teenager, we secured mental health treatment and community supervision.

A runaway girl who was arrested for prostituting, to survive on the streets, needed a safe place to live and grow — something we could help her with.

I even helped a young man who was so afraid of the older gang kids showing up after school, that one morning instead of a lunchbox into his backpack, he put a loaded 9-millimeter. 

We would spend our time that we’d normally take prepping our cases for months and months for trial down the road by coming up with real solutions to the problems as they presented.

Which is the better way to spend our time? How would you prefer your prosecutors to spend theirs?

Why are we spending 80 billion dollars on a prison industry that we know is failing, when we could take that money and reallocate it into education, into mental health treatment, into substance abuse treatment and to community investment so we can develop our neighborhoods?

why should this matter to you? Well, one, we’re spending a lot of money.

Our money. It costs 109,000 dollars in some states to lock up a teenager for a year, with a 60 percent chance that that person will return to the very same system. That is a terrible return on investment.

Number two: it’s the right thing to do. If prosecutors were a part of creating the problem, it’s incumbent on us to create a solution and we can do that using other disciplines that have already done the data and research for us.

Number three: your voice and your vote can make that happen. The next time there’s a local district attorney’s election in your jurisdiction, ask candidates these questions.

One: What are you doing to make me and my neighbors safer?

Two: What data are you collecting, and how are you training your prosecutors to make sure that it’s working? And

Three: If it’s not working for everybody, what are you doing to fix it? If they can’t answer the questions, they shouldn’t be doing the job.

Each one of you that raised your hand at the beginning of this talk is a living, breathing example of the power of opportunity, of intervention, of support and of love. While each of you may have faced your own brand of discipline for whatever malfeasances you committed, barely any of you needed a day in jail to make you the people that you are today — some of the greatest minds on the planet.

Every day, thousands of times a day, prosecutors around the United States wield power so great that it can bring about catastrophe as quickly as it can bring about opportunity, intervention, support and yes, even love. 

Those qualities are the hallmarks of a strong community, and a strong community is a safe one. If our communities are broken, don’t let the lawyers that you elect fix them with outdated, inefficient, expensive methods.

Demand more; vote for the prosecutor who’s helping people stay out of jail, not putting them in.

Demand better. You deserve it, your children deserve it, the people who are tied up in the system deserve it, but most of all, the people that we are sworn to protect and do justice for demand it.

We must, we must do better

Many wounded children went un-noticed: Even when pictures are displayed?

One Photo of a Syrian Child Caught the World’s Attention. 7 injured children went Unnoticed.

By ANNE BARNARD and HWAIDA SAAD. August 21, 2016

BEIRUT, Lebanon — Omran Daqneesh, a small Syrian boy from the embattled rebel-held section of Aleppo, somehow snapped to attention millions of people around the world, who watched and shared the arresting video of him as he wiped dried blood and thick soot from his face. (Turned out to be a faked picture, disseminated by the terrorist group of White Helmet, financed and controlled by the UK)

The widespread interest in 5-year-old Omran surprised the doctors who treated him, the photographer who shot the video and many Syrians who wondered whether the world had only just discovered how children have suffered every day in a war that has raged for more than five years.

On Saturday, Omran’s 10-year-old brother, Ali, died of wounds he suffered during the same attack, medical workers said.

Ali’s death, which did not draw the same instant social media outpouring as Omran’s suffering, only underscored how many Syrian children are dying under the radar of the wider world.

Watch LaterEmailFacebookTwitterWhatsApp

Video Omran Daqneesh, 5, was rescued after an airstrike in the Syrian city of Aleppo.Within hours, a photo of his dust- and blood-covered face captured the world’s attention.This is the story behind the image.

Omran was injured on Wednesday by either a Syrian or a Russian airstrike — Russia has denied involvement — that destroyed the building where his family lived in eastern Aleppo.

On Thursday, a pro-government website published a photograph of a young girl that it said was hurt — around the same time as Omran — by rebel mortar attacks on the government-held western side of the city.

The rebels have no air power, (but chemical weapons and missiles and tanks and canons?) and the devastation in Aleppo has been greater on the rebel-held side

Andrew Bossone comment:

Adding to the many photos “unnoticed”

Omran, the Face of Aleppo’s Suffering, Is Just One of Syria’s Young Victims mobile.nytimes.com|By Anne Barnard and Hwaida Saad Syria’s Cinderella?

One monitoring group, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, said that 100 children had died on the city’s eastern side this month alone, and 49 on the western side. (And the US was angry when safe passages were opened to fleeing Syrians)

For each family, the loss is immeasurable. And there are children constantly caught up in battles in other places, on all sides, across war-torn Syria.

Omran’s picture has resonated for reasons obvious and unknowable. Here are images of seven of the many other children treated in the past week at hospitals in the same region (and in other regions? Selective propaganda images?).

They are taken from among several that were posted by doctors and other residents of Aleppo on a WhatsApp group for journalists.

Ahmad Tadifi,

Doctors did not know who this child was when he arrived at the same hospital that treated Omran. On Wednesday, Ahmad had been separated from his family — as happens to many children in the chaotic aftermath of an attack — in the Mashhad neighborhood of Aleppo.

He underwent surgery for serious injuries to his head, groin and right arm and leg. Later identified, Ahmad was kept in the intensive care unit of the hospital along with his father.

Late on Friday, he died from his injuries.

Rouwaida, 5, and Rana Hanoun, 7 months

The Hanoun sisters were wounded on Wednesday in the same airstrike that injured Omran.

They were among 12 children under 15 who were treated at the same hospital in Aleppo. Both of the girls had suffered shrapnel wounds, but were treated and then released on Thursday morning.

Doctors shared their picture with the WhatsApp group around the same time they shared the photograph of Omran.<img class=”span-asset-img ” src=”https://cdn1.nyt.com/images/2016/08/22/world/22SYRIA2/22SYRIA2-articleLarge.jpg” />Rana Hanoun, 7 months.

Aisel Hajar, 2

<img class=”span-asset-img ” src=”https://cdn1.nyt.com/images/2016/08/22/world/22SYRIA3/22SYRIA3-jumbo.jpg” />Aisel Hajar, 2.

Aisel suffered wounds to her head and to one of her legs on Tuesday, and was treated at Al Quds hospital.

The severity of her injuries could not be confirmed because doctors were busy treating new cases. But activists have nicknamed her “Syria’s Cinderella” because of a picture that one took of her shoes — Mary Janes, worn with white socks.<img class=”span-asset-img ” src=”https://cdn1.nyt.com/images/2016/08/22/world/22SYRIA5/22SYRIA5-articleLarge.jpg” />Aisel Hajar’s Mary Jane shoes.

Amal, 4, and Hikmat Hayouk, 6

<img class=”span-asset-img ” src=”https://cdn1.nyt.com/images/2016/08/22/world/22SYRIA7/22SYRIA7-articleLarge.jpg” />Amal Hayouk, 4.

The Hayouk siblings suffered cuts and bruises when an aircraft opened fire on Wednesday over the Sakhour neighborhood, and they were treated around the same time and at the same hospital as Omran.

The children’s wounds were relatively minor, but an adult relative suffered a critical neck wound.<img class=”span-asset-img ” src=”https://cdn1.nyt.com/images/2016/08/22/world/22SYRIA8/22SYRIA8-articleLarge.jpg” />Hikmat Hayouk, 6.

An unidentified boy

Efforts to identify this boy, below, were unsuccessful. He was treated on Tuesday night at the Omar Hospital and released, said Baraa al-Halabi, a citizen journalist who photographed him.

None of the medical workers who could be reached remembered the boy, which is not unusual in the overwhelmed hospitals.<img class=”span-asset-img span-asset-img-vertical” src=”https://cdn1.nyt.com/images/2016/08/22/world/22SYRIA6/22SYRIA6-jumbo.jpg” />An unidentified boy.

Four children, no picture

At 3 a.m. Saturday, a barrel bomb landed on a house in the Jalloum quarter of Aleppo’s old city, destroying the house and killing seven members of one family — including all four children — said Abdelkafi al-Hamdo, a friend of the father’s.

The children were Aisha, 12; Mohammad, 11; Obaida, 7; and Afraa, 6. There is no picture of their injuries to show because they were pulled dead from the rubble.

Their father, Ali Abu Joud, recorded this video of three of his children’s bodies wrapped in shrouds. His voice can be heard breaking as he tells them goodbye, calling them “habibati” — my darlings — “birds of heaven, gone to the one who is better, gone to God.”

Notes:

Pictures and videos can make a slight difference. If the world media conglomerates were Not owned by US and Saudi Kingdom, this ugly and savage civil war in Syria would have ended long time ago.

So many brutal casualties were committed throughout Syria but the media turned a blind eye.

The same case for the Yemeni children dying from malnutrition and lack of basic medicines.

Same case for South Sudan

And Ethiopia where the government has been killing demonstrators

And No coverage of the suffering in Eritrea (controlled by the US and Israel)

French Jihadists beheaded and slaughtered (gorge coupe’) many Syriens.

Currently, the trend of slaughtered hood of French in France is accelerating after Macron alienated the “Muslim World” by supporting caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad.

Total nonsense position at this junction, as mocking prophets is such a big deal for the “Republic” wellbeing and moral standing.

France has supported Al Nusra and Daesh terrorist groups in Syria.

The predecessor of Macron, (Holland) fully supported the terrorists movements of Al Nusra and labelled it a “moderate” group that was doing a “good job” (What kind of jobs again?).

These terrorists group beheaded the well-known Syrian archeologist Khaled Al Asaad in Tadmor.

Is Macron about to blame Holland for his horrible decisions and apologize for the wrongdoing heaped on the Syrian citizens?

The assassin of the French professor was in frequent communication with another Chichan person in Idlib, a bastion of terrorism in North Syria

سمير التل Samir Tal posted on Fb 

في العام 2013 قال وزير خارجية فرنسا آنذاك ان ( جبهة النصره تقوم بعمل جيد في سورية ) وفي العام 2015 قامت داعش الابن الضال للقاعده مثلها مثل النصره بقطع رأس عالم الاثار السوري مدير اثار ومتاحف تدمر خالد الاسعد

يومها لم يصدر عن الحكومه الفرنسيه اي موقف ( انساني) ولم تصدر اي بيان لادانة العمليه .. تذكرت هذه الوقائع مباشرة بعد مقتل المدرس الفرنسي صامويل باتي والتي اعتبر ماكرون مقتله بانه جريمه تستهدف ( قيم الجمهوريه ) وان هذه المعركه هي معركه (وجوديه ) أي ان جريمة

مقتل مدرس في فرنسا هي معركه وجوديه لفرنسا !
مع العلم بأن الشاب الشيشاني الذي ذبح أستاذه في فرنسا كان على اتصال مع شيشاني آخر

موجود في إدلب

هكذا دلت التحقيقات التي ضبطت مراسلاتهما باللغة الروسية
وبالمقابل قطع رؤوس الجنود السوريين وأكل أحشائهم وقطع المياه عن مئات آلاف من المدنيين وتدمير كل مقومات البلد كان بنظر الحكومه الفرنسيه ( عمل جيد ) يقوم به ( ثوار معتدلون ) !
الخلاصه .. القيم التي يمثلها هؤلاء الثوار المعتدلون والتي تدعمها فرنسا هي جيدة عندما يتعلق الأمر بسوريا ،

لكن إذا كان الأمر يتعلق بفرنسا فهي جريمة نكراء و“إيديولوجية مميتة”. !

Highest positions in Lebanon were Not monopoly to any religious sect, during mandated France from 1919 to 1943. Though it is France that instituted sectarian division in Lebanon.

Anwar Aboulhosn posted on Fb 
الاستعمار الداخلي
ليس لائقا أن يمر هذا اليوم مرور الكرام ففي مثله من عام ١٩٩٢ أنعم الله على الوطن والأمة بشارلمان لبنان الأستاذ نبيه بري كما تكّرم علينا بمنظومة سياسية كجبل لا تهزه ريح .
اللافت انه منذ نهاية الإستعمار الفرنسي وبدل أن نتحرر ونبني دولة نموذجية لجأنا لإستعمار أنفسنا طائفيا ومذهبيا في عهد الاستعمار كان الرئيس الأول لمجلس النواب اللبناني المرحوم داوود عمون عام ١٩٢٢ وتلاه نعوم لبكي وشارل دباس وخالد شهاب ومحمد الجسر من مختلف الطوائف الكريمة حتى بعد الاستقلال كان اول رئيس مجلس نواب حبيب ابو شهلا حتى ١٩٤٧ وبعد الاستقلال عادت حليمة وتكرست المذهبية أكثر وخاصة مع السيطرة السورية وعام ٩٢ مع
انتخاب رجل الدولة المحترم حسين الحسيني رئيسا للمجلس استقال من رئاسة حركة أمل وقال ( لا يجوز أن يكون رئيس مجلس نواب يمثل كل الشعب رئيسا لفئة من الشعب) وخلفه بالحركة الأستاذ عاكف حيدر وإثر تباين مع السوريين تم اختيار نبيه بري بعد خدمات للأشقاء ولم يزل الأفضل
.ان ما كتبته عن مجلس النواب ينطبق على رئاسة الجمهورية والحكومات حيث تناوب من عام ١٩٢٦ شارل دباس وغيره كبترو طراد والفرد نقاش وايوب ثابت وصولا لإميل اده وليسوا جميعا من الطائفة المارونية الكريمة، والكلام عينه ينطبق على الحكومات بدءا ببشارة الخوري مرورا بالفرد نقاش و الأحدب ولم تصبح حكرا على الطائفة السنية الكريمة إلا بعد أن تحررنا من الاستعمار مع رياض الصلح
ولعشرات السنين ما زلنا نرزخ تحت حكم مستعمري الداخل من أعلى السلّم لأسفله حتى وزراء ونواب سئمنا و( زهقنا ) منهم صوت وصورة منذ ٤٠ عام.
أيها الأصدقاء أن النضال من الداخل ضمن هذه المنظومة السياسية هي نكتة لأن هذا النوع من النضال هو ديمقراطي ونتيجته الخائبة محسومة أي نضال واذا اتفق ٤ رؤوس فقط ينهون النضال
.فخامة الرئيس ٢٧ و الثنائي مع توابعهم حوالي ٤٠ والشيخ سعد ٢٠ومجموع ٨٧ من ١٢٠ فمرحبا بهيك معارضة .والاجدى بهم أن يعودوا للشعب وإيقاف معزوفة كلهن ونصهن وربعهن حيث لم يشهد التاريخ انتفاضة أو ثورة ضد نص السلطة أو ربعها وبعدها يعيد الشعب الشرفاء منهم ونحن لا ننكر وجود العديد من الشرفاء ونظيفي الكف والأوادم في هذه المنظومة ولكن مكانهم
مع الشعب وليس مع هذه الطبقة السياسية الفاسدة والفاشلة .واخيرا لقد أثبت معظم شعب لبنان رغم التضييق والكورونا في ذكرى ١٧ تشرين انه ما زال توّاقا للتغيير وعلى الثورة وكوادرها أن تكون على مستوى آمال الشعب لأن منظومة اليوم تحمل بذور نهايتها الحتمية .

Iraqi Birth Defects: Usage of depleted uranium shells for years

I watched a documentary on the cable ARTE yesterday on the birth defects suffered by babies in Iraq after the US invasion of 2003.

And today Hot Posts is disseminating what Rania Khalek wrote. This is a reblog with minor editing. 

Rania Khalek posted on March 20, 2013 in her blog “Dispatches from the underclass”

The United States may have finished dropping bombs on Iraq, but Iraqi bodies and babies will be dealing with the consequences for generations to come in the form of birth defects, mysterious illnesses and skyrocketing cancer rates.

Al Jazeera’s Dahr Jamail reports that contamination from U.S. weapons, particularly Depleted Uranium (DU) munitions, has led to an Iraqi health crisis of epic proportions.

Children being born with two heads, children born with only one eye, multiple tumors  disfiguring facial and body deformities, and complex nervous system problems…” are just some of the congenital birth defects being linked to military-related pollution.

In certain Iraqi cities, the health consequences are significantly worse than those seen in the aftermath of the atomic bombing of Japan at the end of WWII.

(Dr Samira Alani/Al Jazeera])

(Dr Samira Alani/Al Jazeera])

The highest rates are in the city of Fallujah, which underwent two massive US bombing campaigns in 2004.

Though the U.S. initially denied it, officials later admitted using white phosphorus (like what Israel used on Gaza).

In addition, U.S. and British forces unleashed an estimated 2,000 tons of depleted uranium ammunition in populated Iraqi cities in 2003.

DU, a chemically toxic heavy metal produced in nuclear waste, is used in weapons due to its ability to pierce through armor.

That’s why the US and UK were among a handful of nations (France and Israel) who in December refused to sign an international agreement to limit its use, insisting DU is not harmful, science be damned.

Meanwhile, the Pentagon’s refusal to release details about where DU munitions were fired has made it difficult to clean up.

Today, 14.7% of Fallujah’s babies are born with a birth defect, 14 times the documented rate in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Fallujah’s babies have also experienced heart defects 13 times the European rate and nervous system defects 33 times that of Europe.

That comes on top of a 12-fold rise in childhood cancer rates since 2004.

The male-to-female birth ratio is now 86 boys for every 100 girls, indicating genetic damage that affects males more than females.

(Dr Samira Alani/Al Jazeera)

(Dr Samira Alani/Al Jazeera)

(On a side note, these pictures are rather sanitized compared to other even more difficult to look at images. See here if you can bear it.)

If Fallujah is the Iraqi Hiroshima, then Basra is its Nagasaki counterpart.

According to a study published in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a professional journal based in the southwestern German city of Heidelberg, there was a 7 fold increase in the number of birth defects in Basra between 1994 and 2003.

According to the Heidelberg study, the concentration of lead in the milk teeth of sick children from Basra was almost 3 times as high as comparable values in areas where there was no fighting.

In addition, never before has such a high rate of neural tube defects (“open back”) been recorded in babies as in Basra, and the rate continues to rise. According to the study, the number of hydrocephalus (“water on the brain”) cases among new-born is 6 times as high in Basra as it is in the United States.

These phenomenon are not isolated to Fallujah and Basra. The overall Iraqi cancer rate has also skyrocketed:

Official Iraqi government statistics show that, prior to the outbreak of the First Gulf War in 1991, the rate of cancer cases in Iraq was 40 out of 100,000 people.

By 1995, it had increased to 800 out of 100,000 people, and, by 2005, it had doubled to at least 1,600 out of 100,000 people. Current estimates show the increasing trend continuing.

As Grist’s Susie Cagle points out, “That’s potentially a more than 4,000% increase in the cancer rate, making it more than 500 percent higher than the cancer rate in the U.S.

Dr. Mozghan Savabieasfahani, an environmental toxicologist based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, told Jamail that “These observations collectively suggest an extraordinary public health emergency in Iraq. Such a crisis requires urgent multifaceted international action to prevent further damage to public health.”(

Dr. Samira Alani/Al Jazeera)

Instead, the international community, including the nation most responsible for the health crisis is mostly ignoring the problem.

To make matters worse, Iraq’s healthcare system, which was once the envy of the region, is virtually nonexistent due to the mass exodus of Iraq’s medical doctors since 2003.

According to recent estimates, there are currently fewer than 100 psychiatrists and 20,0000 physicians serving a population of 31 million Iraqis.

Dahr Jamail was on Democracy Now this morning discussing the horrific effects of military-related pollution in Iraq:

Yanar Mohammad, President of the Organization for Women’s Freedom in Iraq was also on Democracy Now and addressed the toxic legacy of birth defects in Iraq. (I interviewed Mohammed for a piece I wrote for Muftah about the deterioration of Iraqi women’s rights since the invasion, which you can read here.

)https://www.youtube.com/embed/5eBgRcgLNW0?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent 


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